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January 12, 1922 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-01-12

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t

THE WEATHER
FAIR AND COLDER
TODAY

<Y

Sf ir i

~Iaiti

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIRE
SERVICE

VOL. XXXII. No. 78 ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, JANUARY 12, 1922 PRICE FIVE CENTS

_ _ r

S WILL BE REOPENED'
FOR THREEWEEKS
NOTHING OF SUFFICIENT VALUE
FOUND IN THOSE SUBMITTED
TO WARRANT DECISION
INCREASE FIRST PRIZE
TO $75;SECOND TO $25
Dramatic Interest, Originality and
Better Handling Most
Needed
After a careful examination of the
plots submitted in the recent scenario
contest of The Daily, the committee
appointed by President Marion L.
Burton in conference with the presi-
dent of the producing company decid-
ed yesterday that the contest must be
reopened for a period of three weeks.
Nothing of sufficient originality, dra-
matic interest, or literary value was
found to warrant a decision.
Favored by Regents
The committee that the President
appointed to handle the scenarios,
following the favorable action of the
Board of Regents toward the pro-
posal of The Daily at it December
meeting, is composed of Prof. L. A.
Strauss, head of the .English de-
partment, and Dr. Firank A. Rob-
bins, assistant to the President. They
were unwilling to announce any con-
cludion after their examination . of
the scripts withbut the final confirma-
tion of a representative of the produc-
ers, but the president of the motion
picture company with which The Daily
has contracted for the film was in
Ann Arbor yesterday and joined in the
conclusion that the plots were alto-
gether inadequate.
As a result of this decision the com-
petition carried on by The Daily be-
fore vacation will be reopened, to
continue until Feb. 1. The value of
the prizes to be awarded to the two
successftl contestants has been rais-
ed to $100-$75 for the first prize and
$25 for the second. The other rules
will remain the same. The contest
will be open to all persons connected
with the Uiversity in any capacity,
with the exception of members of the
editorial and business staffs of The
Daily. Scenarios should be submitted
in care of the Scenario Editor at The
Daily office.
Plots Commonplace
The chief difficulty with the scen-
arios, causing the committee to insist
on the submission of more material,
was the lack of originality apparent
throughout. Trite situationsAndiffer-
ent character analysis, and common-
place plots were submitted in large
numbers. The flood of hackneyed
movie plots that has overtaken the in-
dustf is reflected in the type of story
subitted, according to the judges, for
nothing of real dramatic value was to
be found.
COMMERCE CU RWILL
HONOR JENKS SA1UROAY
Prof. Jeremiah Whipple Jenks, '78,
of New York university, will speak
Saturday evening at the Michigan Un-I
ion under the auspices of the Com-
merce club following a supper given
by the Commerce club in his honor.
Professor Jenks will speak on "The
Disarmament Conference."
All those desiring to meet Professor
Jenks or who are interested in the
work of the Comemrce club are in-
vited to attend the supper and talk,
including both faculty and students.
Those who expect to be present at the'
affair will please call up Harry Rath
at 754-J.
Professor Jenks will deliver a sec-

ond address while in Ann Arbor at
7:30 o'clock next Sunday evening un-
der the auspices of the Union Services
committee at Hill auditorium on "Jes-
us in Relation to International Poli-
tics."
Daughter Born to Professor Immel
A daughter, Virginia May, was born
Monday to Prof, R. K. Immel and Mrs.
Immel.
1922 LITERARY CLASS
The lists of paid and unpaid
dues will not be posted in the
Registrar's office until the aft-
ernoon of Friday, Jan. 20. Every-
senior who has not yet paid their
dues please mail check for $2 to
the treasurer at once. Enclose
self-addressed and stamped en-
velope for receipt.
C. MAURICE ATKINSON, j
Treasurer.

Pi Delta Epsilon
Initiates 8 Men
Eight men were taken into Pi Delta
Epsilon, national honorary journalis-
tic fraternity, at the initiation held at
4- o'clock yesterday afternoon in the
Union. Following the initiation the
organization gave a banquet for the
new members at 6:15 o'clock. Francis
M. Smith, '22, president of the local
chapter, acted as toastmaster. Brew-
ster P. Campbell, '22, welcomed the
initiates, and E. P. Lovejoy, '23, re-
plied for the "cubs."
Discussing the field of journalistic
activity in the University, Prof. Edson'
R. Sunderland, of the Board in Control
of Student Publications, emphasized
the importance of work on the var-
ious publications, and the service ren-
dered the student body through such
work. "It is through the medium of
the publications that the new student
may best become familiar with Mich-
igan traditions and institutions," he
said.
Professor Sunderland explained the
standard set by H. G. Wells in his
"Outlines of History"-that civiliza-
tion has progressed only as rapidly
as facilities for the exchange of ideas
and experiences have developed-and
applied it to the collegiate world to
show the part taken by student news-
papers and magazines in the develop-
ment of university life.
The initiates are: Vernon F. Hil-
lary, '23; E. P. Lovejoy, '23; Paul E.
Watzel, '23; Marion B. Stahl, '23;
Bowen E. Schumacher, '24L; L. A.
Kern, '22; Edwin R. Meiss, '23, and
G. P. Overton, '22.
MANY9APLY FOR
TICKETS TO HOP
More Than 1200 Applications Given
Out at the Union
Yesterday
SUB-COMMITTEE NAMED TO
HELP MAKE ARRANGEMENTS
More than 1,200 applications for
tickets for the J-Hop were given out
at the Union yesterday, according to
R. D. Gibson, in charge ,of tickets. The
committee requests that all applica-
tions be in before 6 o'clock Friday
evening in order that it may begin to
check over the lists.
Answers will probably be sent the
applicants eary next week. The an-
swers will Indicate whether or not the
applicant will receive a ticket and if
so, a definite time will be set when he
is to call at the Union to purchase it.
All applications received after 6
o'clock Friday evening will be given
consideration according to their arriv-
al. Money should not be sent with
the applications.
Tickets for house party chaperones
may be pu'chased along with booth
tickets. Each booth will be allowed
but one patron and patroness.
At the regular meeting of the gen-
eral committee of the Hop yesterday,
a sub-committee to aid the genral
committee was named by C. A. Hum-
mer, chairman. Those selected are
Victor Method, Thorne Brown, Ever-
ett Michaels, Henry Mudd, William
Riley, James House, Seward Cramer,
Lyle Torrey, E. G. Newhall, F. J.
Ortman, L. A. Kern, Lawrence Snell,
Richard Sweet, Walter Velde, Howard
Rich, Walter Kreinheder, W. H. Light-
body, Frank Camp, J. M. Winters, Jr.,
Carl Berry, and Alfred Nauser.
HOP RULES ON TICKETS
APPROYEO BY COUNCIL,
Regulations governing the distribu-
tion of tickets for the J-Hop were ap-

proved as submitted at the regular
meeting of the Student council held
last night at the Union.
The rules were presented before the
council, in accordance with a past rul-
ing of that body, by Robert D. Gib-
son, chairman of the ticket committee
of the Hop and the method of distri-
bution was clearly explained. At the
same time a committee from the coun-
cil, consisting of Robert F. Wieneke,
'22, and Eugene Harbeck, '22E, was
appointed to settle all ticket disputes.
ENGAGEMENT OF FORMER
UNION HEAD ANNOUNCED
The engagement of Hazel Storz, '22,
to Paul W. Eaton, '21, was announced
at luncheon at the Pi Beta Phi house
yesterday. Miss Storz is a member of]
Wyvern and Mortarboard.
Eaton was president of the Michigan
Union last year. He is a member of1
the Psi Upsilon 'fraternity, Michigam-
ua, and Comedy club. He is associat-
ed with the Burroughs Adding Ma-
chine company. Detroit. at present.-

sect . WILL BEGIN-
DRIVE FOR $4,000
Makes Budget $1,000 Less Than Year
Previous Because of Hard
Times
CAMPAIGN TO START TUESDAY
AND LAST FOR THREE DAYS
With the budget for the year placed
at $4,000, the Student Christian asso-
ciation will begin a three day cam-
paign next Thursday to raise at least
this amount.
"Realizing that times are extreme-
ly hard," said Hugh W. Hitchcock,
'22, president of the association, "the
S. C. A. has cut down its budget from
$5,00a to $4,000, the barest possible
minimum upon which the organization
can function successfully. Since the
association is distinctly a student or-
ganization, we earnestly desire a con-
tribution from every student, no mat-
ter how small the sum may be
Inform Campus of Expense
"During the next four days the cam-
pus is going to be thoroughly inform-
ed concerning the expenditure. of
every cent taken in. The cause is un-
deniably a deserving one, and worthy
of the support of the entire student
body."
C. Maurice Atkinson, '22, is general
chairman of the campaign, while Law-
rence Dooge, '24, is assistant chair-
man. The drive will be run on the
same plan used by the Union and the
S. C. A. last year. There will be 20
teams and the captain of each team
has selected 15 men to work under
him.
All campaign captains will meet at
4:30 o'clock tis afternoon in Lane
hall to cornplete organization details.
Each captain is requested to bring a
list of the men on his team.
The budget is divided into 14 'differ-
ent items. Several of the items will be
published in The Daily each day for
the next few days so that the student
body will know how much is going to
each department and just how the
money is being spent.
Money for University Services
One thousand dollars are needed for
University services. Six Sunday eve-
ning services have been held in Hill
auditorium so far this year. Six more
will be given, making a larger num-
ber of services given this year than
any previous year. Many of the speak-
ers, such as Bishop William Reming-
ton, Henry C. King, president of Ober-
lin college, President Marion L. Bur-
ton, J. W. Jenks, '78, *and Bishop
Charles J. McConnell, are known na-
tionally. Approximately 25,0000 stu-
dents attend the services given during
the year. The University Service com-
mittee has charge of this work. The
money goes for payment of some ot
the speakers, expenses, music, and
janitor service.
Mloore. To Offer
Works Of Parker
And lendelssohn
Earl V. Moore, University organist,
will give the next twilight recital at
4:15 o'clock this afternoon in Hill
auditorium. His program will be
made up of works by Parker, Men-
delssohn and Sibelius.
Mr. Moore will open his. program
with thre selections, "Risoluto,"
"Sumber Song" and Allegretto in B
flat minor by the late Dr. Horatio
Parker, professor of music at Yale
university. His writing for the or-
gan evinces a keen perception of its
many resources. The three works
chosen are from a group of "Recital
Pieces" published some years before
his death.
Mendelssohn's Sonata, No. 2, grave
and adagio movements, will make up

the second division of the program.
These portions of the Second Sonata
illustrate Mendelssohn's spirituality
and the serious, sober, "Bachesque"
style which restrains his romanticism.
Finlandia, a tone poem, by Sibe-
lius, will conclude the program. The
work was composed for the orchestra
4n 1894, a few years before Finland
lost her identity as a nation. Though
all the themes of this work are orig-
inal, the composition is so saturated
with the racial spirit of the Finns that
it evoked an intense enthusiasm in the
composer's native land whenever it
was performed.
SENOR MERCADO'S LECTURE
POSTPONED UNTIL JAN. 19
Senor Mercado, who was to have de-
livered an illustrated lecture on "New
Porto Rico" on Friday night in Tap-
pan hall, has been obliged to postpone
his address until the evening of Jan.
19 when it will be given at 7:15
o'clock in Tappan hall. The delay
was due to the tardy shipment of a
set nf glides.

3

"MIen Taught All Wrong Too "kSays
Mlichigan Girl Replying To .Leacock

(By Agnes Holmquist)
"We are teaching women all wrong"
is the title of an article on the higher
education of women written by Ste-
phen Leacock for a recent issue of
Collier's. He begins the article by
stating that he was not only educated
in a co-educational institution but has
taught in one for 20 years, hence only
fools will a\ttempt to deny his schol-
arly conclusions. It is a question
after reading the article whether he
wrote it in the capacity of a teacher
of economics or in the role of a hu-
morist.
"The fundamental trouble," he says,
"is that men and women are different
creatuies with different minds, differ-
ent aptitudes and different paths in
life." Women, I think, would be the
last to deny that they have different
minds and aptitudes. That is hard'y
to be lamented. But as to the dif-
ferent "paths in life,"-there is a
question. Unfortunately women must
live in the same faulty political, eco-
nomic and social system that men in-
habit. In fact it begins to look as
though it would be their task to help
clear up the tangle that a man-ruled
world has succeeded in producing.
How, then, are the paths in life differ-
ent? Or Is Mr. Leacock's ideal woman
a creature of dust-cloths and bread-
pans whose horizon is bounded by the
nursery and the kitchen.
BATESON TALKS TO
FULLAUITOIUM
English Scientist Stresses Exchange
of Views Between Britons
and Amercans
TECHNICAL LECTURE DEALS
WITH SUBJECT OF HEREDITY
Professor William Bateson, director
of the John Innes Horticultural Insti-
tution, Surrey, England, addressed
yesterday evening as large an audi-
ence as the Natural Science auditor-
Ium could hold.
Professor Bateson greatly empha-
sized the advantage of personal ex-
change of views between English and
American students that has been pos-
sible since the war. This is especial-
ly true, according to Professor Bate-
son, because of the divergence in ideas
due to much independent work along
the lines of heredity and evolution.
Heredity was the topic of his highly
technical lecture, "Somatic Segrega-
tion." He talked on allelomorphic
pairing, using many colored slides to
make more clear his meaning both in
his talk on alelomorphism and subse-
quently on determination and coloring
in hybrids. He paid tribute to the dis-
coverers of the intimate effect of
chromosomes upon heredity.
POSTPONE OPENING OF
THEATERTILL FEB 7
Due to the proximity of the examina-'
tion period it was decided yesterday
by members of Mimes that the open-
ing of the new Michigan Union theater
previously announced for Jan. 27
should be postponed until Friday,
Feb. 17, of the week following the
J-Hop.
The new theater will be complete in
every detail by that date, according
to Mimes' officials. Several new
pieces of stage equipment have ar-
rived during the past few days, and
with the installment of the fixtures
which are used for stage lighting ef-
fects, the Michigan Union theater will;
possess a set of operating accessories
which will be above the standard of
equipment in the average theater.
MICHIGAN TRIMS
AGGIES BY 5 TO 1
Michigan's informal hockey team

opened its season at the Coliseum last
night with a five to one victory over
the M. A. C. sextette. During theopen-
ing period each team was at a loss to'
penetrate the other's defense and it
was not until near the close of the
period that the Aggie ice aggrega-
tion scored its first and only counter
of the game.
The score was the result of a chance
accident when Captain Doherty of M.
A. C. shot the puck from behind the1
Wolverine goal and it hit Comb's
skate and 'darted into the goal.
Professor White Confined to Bed
Prof. A. E. White, director of the
department of engineering research, is
confined to his bed suffering from
bronchitis. Professor White's condi-
tion is not serious but he will be con-
finra +M . isaAttha +.na .h.i. ..s.1.

Doesn't Give Other Side
He cites the fact that in mathemat-
ics and the sciences women have al-
wagrs been outclassed, so he wishes
"to dry their tears and take away the
subject." Arguing from the other side
we might say that in the realm of fine
arts, history and the languages the
men are usually inferior, so let us
"hush their swearing and permit them
to omit these subjects."
Mr. Leacock evidently believes that
higher education, so called, is not nec-
essarily a broad one. What women
dislike, or that for which they have
no "special aptitude," they should not
be forced to study. That is easily
mended. Make all subjects elective,
with no requirements for graduation
but hours. The principle applied to
both sexes would have a peculiar re-
sult. An educated man, one on speak-
ing terms with the fourth dimension,
could still live in absolute ignorance
of the Queen's English. While all ed-
ucated women would have read "Colds
and Their Treatment," and "How to
Make a One-minute Cake." In other
words the higher intellectual life is
meant for the chosen few with the
"special aptitude." It is the same at-
titude of mind that has made Russia
the great international power that she
is, the same disregard for the aver-
age.
"Leacock Is Right"
That present day education for
women is inadequate, Mr. Leacock is
convinced. He argues that in the
majority of cases she marries and
should have spent her time on prep-
aration for life as a wife and mother.
She should have had at least six
months of nursing. But along the
same line, how many boys are trained
to be model husbands and fathers "by
not giving them a course in practi-
cal carpentry, plumbing and auto-re-
pair?
Mr. Leacock is right. The educa-
tion of women is inadequate. But he
has only touched on half the prob-
lem. In his kindly concern for the
women and their studies he has for-
gotten that the same arguments may
be applied to the men and their stud-
ies.
EXPLINS AMISION FEE
AILER GIVES STATEMENT OF EX.
ACT BASKETBALL SITUATION AT
MICHIGAN
Editor, The Michigan Daily:
This communication is made not in
any sense as a defense of the action
of the Athletic association in making
a separate charge for admission to
basketball games but merely for the
purpose of giving to those interested a
statement as to the exact situation.
There has been a curious notion on the
part of many that there is something
deeply mysterious about the manage-
ment of the University's athletic activ-
ities. There are of ,course occasions
when negotiations for the closing of
contracts are going on when publicity
would be undesirable. Aside frontthis
I know of nothing in the eight years
during which I have been a member
of the athletic board when there has
been any disposition to keep -the ac-
tions or the reasons for such actions
secret.
In 1912 the Board of Regents pro-
vided for an annual fee of $5 to be
charged 'each student of the Univer-
sity on and after Oct. 1, 1912, payable
as a part of the regular annual fees.
In connection with this action it was
provided as follows:
"Resolved: That after Oct. 1, 1912,
free access shall be given to Ferry
field to all students, and to Palmer
field to all women students of the Un-
iversity."
Practice Continued
Although this resolution provides
only for admission of all students to
Ferry field, the association adopted the
practice from the beginning of "throw-
ing in" not only reserved seats in the
stands on Ferry field but also admis-
sion to athletic events held in the
gymnasium. This practice of admis-

sion to the gymnasium was continued
after basketball was established as
an intercollegiate sport. As the result
of this practice there arose each year
in respect to this sport deficits.run-
ning from $5,000 to $7,000.
After information had been acquir-
ed showing that season athletic books
at other Conference institutions cost
from $5 to 10, and that at all but one,
aside from Michigan, an increase of
from $1 to $4.50 had been made for
the year 1920-21, the Board in Control
of Athletics voted at its February
nmccting to request tae Board of Reg-
ents to increase the athletic fee to $8.
At a meeting of the Board of Regents
in June last it was provided that the
athletic fee shall be increased from
$5 to $6. It will be noted, however,
that under that action of the Regents,
(Continuad n Paxi We irh

No DECISION ON
REACHED 9 ASYE
OUTCOME RESTS UPON STAND
TAKEN BY FEWER THAN
SIX MEMBERS
HOPE TO REACH VOTE
SOMETIME TOMORROW
Democrats Will Hold Conference
Among Selves Before Opening
Senate Tomorrow
(By Associated Press)
Washington, Jan. 11.-The fight in
the senate over the right of Truman
H. Newberry, republican, of Michigan,
to a seat in that body, which has been
contested by Henry Ford, his opponent
in the 1918 election, continued in all
its intensity today and when the ses-
sion ended tonight prediction of the
outcome generally was held in abey---
ance, sotuncertain has the result be-
come. It was agreed among leaders
that the outcomegrested on the final
position to be taken by fewer than half
a dozen senators, whose attitude has
not been disclosed.
Hopes for a victory today were pass-
ed early by last minute demands of
senators desiring mpre time to speak,
Even an attempt by Senator Spencer,
who is leading the Newberry support-
ers, to obtain an agreement to vote at
4 o'clock, was objected to by Senator
King, of Utah. Mr. King suggested
that the agreement might be attended
to tomorrow if brought up then.
Leaders said tonight that further
informal conferences would be held
among the Democrats before the sen-
ate meets tomorrow.
ASSISTANT FOBL
MNGERSPANOUNCED
ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION FAVORS
ALLOWING SENIORS' CHOICE
OF SWEATERS
Paul R. Reed, '24E, Raymond S.
Powers, '24, Donald C. McCabe, '24,
and Robert B. Mitchell, '24, were nam-
ed as assistant football managers for
the coming year at the meeting of the
board of directors of the Athletic as-
sociation last night upon recomme
dation of the committee in charge-"of
appointment.
The board also passed a resolution
favoring the giving of various types
of sweaters with letter awards, al-
lowing a senior who had won a letter
the previous year in the same sport to
select the type of sweater which
should bear the insignia. Arrange-
ments havg, been made for three
styles of sweaters, the V-neck, jersey
and sweater coat.
The plan for awarding managers in
various sports with insignia which
would distinguish them as managers
was discussed, and the advisability of
an outline block "M" was considered.
The matter was left in the hands of a
committee of three fr further inves-
tigation and action.
MATINEE CONCERT
ATl UNION TODAY
Works of Beethoven, Boellman and
Rachmaninoff will make up the pro-
gram of the MatineehChamber Music
concert at 4 o'clock this afternoon in
the assembly hall of the Union.
The program will be given by Ethel

Czaplinski, a young Polish violinist,
and Boris Hambourg, a 'cellist of in-
ternational reputation.
Their complete program will be as
follows:
Trio, D Major, Op. 70, No: 1..
..Beethoven
Allegro vivace e con brio
Largo assai ed espressivo
Presto
'Cello and Piano Sonata, Op. 40
.......................Boellmann
Maestoso--Allegro con fuoco
Andante
Allegro Molto
Trio, Op. 9.............Rachmaninoff
Moderato-Allegro moderato
Quasi variazione
Allegro risoluto-Moderato
INTERFRATERNITY NOTICE
.The interfraternity conference
will meet at 7:30 o'clock tomor-
( row at the Union.
KENNETH McCOLL, '23M,
President.

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