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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 04, 1921 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-10-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I HE IV

..

1 Initu

I ..E',

NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY
OF MICHIGAN
morning except Monday during the Univer.
ard in Control of Student Publications.

MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Associated' Press is exclusively entitled to the use for
ation of all news dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
in this paper and the local news published therein.
ered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
atter.
ascription by carrier or mail, $3.50.
ces : Ann Arbor Press building,.Maynard Street.
>nes: Business, 96o; Editorial, 2414.
rmunications not to exceed 300 words, if signed, the sig-
not necessarily to appear in print, but as an evidence of
rid notices of events will be published in The Daily at the
n of~ the Editor, if left at or mailed to The Daily office.
d communications will receive no consideration.aioman-
will be returned unless the writer incloses postage.
Daily does not necessarily endorse the sentiments ex-
in the communications.
hat's Going On" notices will not be received after 6 o'clock
evening preceding insertion.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
GING EDITOR .......... BREWSTtR P. CAMPBELL
t Managing Editor..............Hugh W Hitchcock
iter ................. .....E. P. W itcockJr
M -B.-Stahl G. P. Overton
R. E. Adams Hughston MtBain
Paul Watzel Edward Lambrecht
F. H. McPike
is..T. J. Whinery, L. A. Kern, S. T. Beach, E. R. Meiss
ent Jditors...T. S. Sargent, T. H. Adamse
gEditor.......... ......George Reindel
's Editor...................... ......Elizabeth Vickery
Editor............ ..... E R. Meiss
Assistants
ry B. Grundy John Dawson Ben H. Lee, Jr.
lace F. Elliott Sidney B. Coates JulianrMacka
A. Klaver Lowell S. Kerr Howard Donahue
thy Whipple H. E. Howlettg Arnold /Fleig
[on Koch Katherine Mfontgomery
BUSINESS STAFF
'telephone 960
ESS MANAGER ..... ....VERNON F. HILLERY
ing ........... .........F. M. Heath, A. J. Parker
ion .........................Nathan W...Robertson
s .... ...... .....John J. Hamels, Jr.
ion . ....Herold C. Hunt'
Assistants
H., Willis Heidbreder 'ITyler Stevens
Walter K. SchererM yrtin Goldring
W. Cooley L. B Parks
sons wishing to secure information concerning news for
e of The Daily should see the night editor, who has full
Af all news to be printed that night.

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 4, 1921

Night Editor--HUGHSTON MBAIN
T here will be a meeting of the editorial staf and
ryouts of Th'e Daily at 5 O'clock this afternoon.
WHEN TO UNCOVER-
Last Saturday's game brought out the fact that
tine confusion persists as to the proper time to
tand with heads uncovered'at athletic contests.
Vhei' "The Victors" was played several in the
tands removed their hats, thereby giving this piece
he courtesy that should be reserved for "The
(ellow and Blue", our official song. As has been
wointed out before "The Yellow and Blue should
eceive the same distinction over University songs
hat qur national anthem is given over other pat-
iotic selections. It will be remembered that last
all was the first time that taking off hats for "The
[ictors" became noticeable, and this practice is
onrary to years of tradition.
Another error that has been fallen into of late
s that of improperly observing the flag raising cer-
mony which was introduced at the University to
onor our soldier dead. Last Saturday this cus-
om was carried out with a shocking lack of for-
aality. It entirely escaped the notice of some of
hose at the game, very few seemed to realize the
ignificance of the occasion, and almost no one paid
he tribute by standing with head bare.
Such breaches of etiquette as these at an athletic
ntest mar what would otherwise be an impressive
pectacle. Stand uncovered while the flag is being
aised and while "The Yellow and Blue" is being
layed, but don't uncover for "The Victors"
THE ALUMNUS A WEEKLY
Beginning with' its issue of next week, the Mich-
gan Alumnus will change considerably its status
mong University publications and will become a
veekly magazine instead of a monthly. With per-
aps a slightly enlarged staff, the editor, Secretary
Vilfred B. Shaw of the Alumni association, hopes
o be able to instill into the new publication a de-
ree of "snap" and "liveness" which the old one
as never possessed.
The change is certainly lone for the better, and
narks a distinct growth in the possible value of
ae magazine. Though in the past everything has
een done by those in charge of the Alumnus to
lake it a publication which would appeal strongly
> all graduates and former members of the Uni-
ersity, it has been found extremely difficult, be-
ause of the long intervals coming between issues,
> keep it from -being merely a summarizing bul-
tin - and a rather stale bulletin at that. Alumni,
rom time to time, have complained of the failure
f the Alumnus to tell them the interesting little
hings that were going on about the campus.
The fault could not be laid at the door of the
ditor, however; Mr. Shaw was simply so ham-
ered by the infrequency of publication that it was
rpossible for him to get away from the old bulle-
n type. In times like the present, when outside
apers carry numerous and often lengthy stories on
he activities at, the various colleges and universi-
es, and when the various campuses themselves are
1 a continual stir of businesslike bustle, the
ionthly magazine, through its very nature, simply
annot fulfill the requirement set up for it - that
f keeping the members of the graduate body in-

formed of "the latest" at their alma mater.
It is possible for the Alumnus to fill an immense
place in disseminating the news of the campus
among the thousands of the University's alumni,
and its change from a monthly to a weekly is a long
step toward the ultimate goal of a fulfillment of all
its aims and purposes.
OUR UNION
Once upon a time - to begin in the manner of
story books - the University had no Michigan
Union. But; after years of waiting on the part of
students and faculty, the Union opened its career
in an old residence on the site of the present build-
ing, from which humble beginning it grew until it
finally found for itself a home of the ultra-modern
structure which we now use as a club.
The Union was organized primarily for the male
members of the University. Freshman were, and
always have been, included in this category. The
yearling is as much a member of the Union as the
professor, graduate, *or upperclassman; but that is
no reason why the yearling should abuse his privi-
leges.f
Some freshman and even some upperclassmen,
who come to Michigan feel that, simply because
they are members of the student club, they have the
right to do anything they please in it. Such is a
mistaken idea, for some of the things they may
please to do may not be fitting.
- The Michigan Union has been bothered, in re-
cent times, by petty thievery, mutilation of maga-
zines, and like annoyances. These, however, are
rapidly decreasing, and the frehman . class this
year, by making the Union its home and by treating
the building as such, can do much to help the insti-
tution and to establish new precedents of conduct
and consideration which will make our great stu-
dents' club even more of a benefit to its members
than it has been in the past.
WILL CAUSE DESERT RESULT?
Two years ago, spurred by the apparent demand
for a literary publication at the University of Michi-
gan, men interested in student activities organized
a new monthly magazine known as the Michigan
Chimes, having for its definite purpose the voicing
of student opinion.
After a year of total reliance upon the student
body for its material, Chimes broadened out to em-
brace the views of the more renowned of Michigan
alumni, and the works of those graduates who had
achieved success in the journalistic world. With
the abundance of material gathered from these two
sources Chimes has created a truly literary publi-
cation of exceptional merit, a fitting answer, to the
hue and cry of two years ago. To be able to enjoy
a campus magazine of the character of Chimes is a
privilege which few universities can boast.
But Chimes serves other purposes than a purely
cultural one. By bringing together the efforts of
alumni and undergraduates inside the same cover,
' a closer contact between these two bodies has been
effected. The student benefits from the more ma-
ture writing of his predecessors, while the alumnus
feels with pride that he still retains an active in-
terest in his Alma Mater although his college days
are over.
Two years ago the student body was crying for
a literary magazine at Michigan. At present Mich-
igan has such a publication, but it is not being sup-
ported, and needs hundreds of subscriptions to pre-
,serve it a success. When the first issue of Chimes
appears this week, will the student body whose
insistence caused its organization desert the publi-
cation at this time, or will it help maintain a maga-
zine so representative of the best in Michigan liter-
ature, from both undergraduate anid alumni
sources?
Michigan should have no trouble in winning, the
Conference golf championship, judging from the
number of knickerbockers seen around,the campus.
The Telescope

The Other Side of a Familiar Song
There's Dauntless Dick at Harvard,
At Yale 'twas handsome Hal,
Chicago saw my Twelfth street swain
He sure was a wonderful pal!
And Mac was an Aggie at Lansing;
At Ypsi I found just plain Sam -
But the one best bet - I'll not forget -
Is my Caveman at Michigan.
- Written from the Other Side.
Cheer up! Only 196 more days of school.
Quoth Eppie Taff
The -death o{ Joseph Slaughter
Resulted from a drink;
He put zinc in the water
'Stead of water in the sink.
Prom Two Angles
Knickerbockers-My father went around the
whole golf course in 8I.
Overalls-That's nothin'. My grandfather went
all the way to :California in '49.
Our. Latest Song Entitled:
"Times May Be Bad, But the Spiritualist Is Still
Doing Wonders."
Famous Closing Lines
"That's the bunk," said the landlord as he
pointed out a sagging double-decker. ERM.

for all colleges at both, stores

44

GRAHAM
21oth ends of the diagonal bvalk

._ __ ..

DETROIT UNITEI LINES
Ann Arbor and Jackson
TIM11E TABLE,
(Eastern Standa1"l Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars-6.os a.
n., 7:o5 a. i., 8:io a. ni. and hourly to 9:1o
p. in.
Jackson Express Cars (local stops of Ann
Arbor), 9:48 a. in. and every two hours to
9:48 p. n.
Local Cars East Bound-5s 5 an., 7:00 a.
in, and every two hours to9 g:oo p. in., x :oo
p. in. To Ypsilanti only-i x: 4 p. ni., 12.25
a. in., I :T5a. m.
To Saline, change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars West Bound-7:5o a. m., 2:40 p.

"Who Was Jon Hanco<
asked Thomas A. Edison in his
Employment Questionnaire

To Jackson and Kalamazoo-Limited
8:48, 10:44 a. m., 12:48, 2:48, 4:48.
To Jackson and Lansing-Limited:
p. m.

cars:
8 :4 8

1921

OCTOBER

2.
9
16
23
30

3
10
17
24
31

4
11
18
25

5
12
19
26

6
13
20
27

14
21,
28

1921
1
15
22
29

We will pay One
Hundred Dollars
($100) for the best
atswerto Mr.Ed-
ison's questiOn.

N~OTICE TO MEN
We do all kinds of high-class Hat
work at pre-war prices. Hats turned
inside out, with all new trimmings,
are as god as new.
FACTORY HAT STORE
617 PACKARD STREET
Telephone 1792
P ARCE4
DELI VERY
TELEPHONE
270 0
TRUNKS
'N EVERYTHING

Competition closes November 15,1.
ADDRESS
DEPARTMENT OF PUBLICITY
LIFE INSURANCE-COMPAN
OF BOSTON. MASSACHUSETTS

A complete line of tex

and'

r- --

'1

, .
:_ .

:

CROWDS! CROWDS.. C

Continue to rush to the

AJ

E

S

T

11

CECIL B.

I DE MILLE'S

TO SEE
0 h

u

Greatest
Production

'no,

With The Greatest Cast Ever Ass

/

ii
WALLACE REID, ELLIOTT DEXTER, GLORIA SWANSON, BEBE DANIELS, MONTE
BLUE, THEODORE ROBERTS, THEODORE KOSLOFF, JULIA FAYE, WANDAHAW-
LEY, AGNES AYRES, RAYMOND HATTON, POLLY MORAN
ENOUGH STARS FOR TEN PICTURES ALL IN THIS ONE

11

DAILY MATINEES - 2:00 and 4:00
EVENING SHOWS - 7:00 and 9:00
COME JUST BEFORE THESk HOURS
AND BE SURE OF A SEAT

EVENING PRICES
MAIN FLOOR-50c BALCONY
BARGAIN MATINEE
MAIN FLOOR-35C BALCONY
PRICES INCLUDE TAX

TEN PIECE ORCHESTRA and othei

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