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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 10, 1922 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-01-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MIC

.s

.Y

---------------

C

.

tgauT BatIg

OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY
OF MICHIGAN
Published every morning except Monday during the Waiver-
sty year by the Board in Control of Studet Publications.
MEMBER 01 THE ASSOCIATED PRES
The Associated Press is exclusive entitled to the wee for
rpulicdation ofalnew i itce crdtd toi rnt otherwise
crsedted ir igae and telal news pulished tnoetherise
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
class matter.
Sunscription by carrier or mail, 3.5.'
Offices: Ann Arbor Press building, Maynard Street.
Phones: Business, 96o; Editorial, 2414.
Communications not to exceed 300 words, if signed, the sig-
nature not necessarily to appear in print, but as an evidence of
faith, and notices of events will be published in The Daily at the
discretion of the Editor, if left at or mailed to The Daily office.
Unsigned communications will receive no consideration. No man-
uscript will be returned unless the writer incloses postage.
The Daily does not necessarily endorse the sentiments e-
pressed in the communications,.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
MANAGING EDITOR.......... BREWSTER P. CAMPBELL
Assistant Managing Editor..................Hugh W. Hitchcock
City Editor ................................. E. P. Lovejoy, Jr.
Night Editors-
R. E. Adams M. B. Stahl
Edward Lambrecht Paul Watzel
(. .Oveton
editorial Board Chairman.......................T. J. Winery
" ssistant-
S."T. Beach E. R. Meiss
L. A. Kern Leo Hershdorfer
Sunday Magazine Editor.. . ..........Thornton W. Sargent, Jr.
Exchange Editor ..............................George Et. Sloan
Mlusic Editor...................................Sidney B. Coates
Sporting Editor............................. George Reindel
Women's Editor ........................... Elizabeth Vicker
Humor Editor.................................E R. Meiss
Assistants
Kingsley S. Andersson L. L. Fenwick B. H. Lee
Masrice Berman Dorothy G. Geltz Robert M. Loeb
Cecil R. Betron H. B. Grundy . E. Mack
Jack D. Briscoe Sadyebeth Heathr Kathrine Montgomery
W. B. Butler Winona A. Hibbard R. C. Moriarty
R. N. Byers Harry D. Hoey J. F. Pontius
A. D. Clark Agnes Holmquist Lillian Scher
Harry C. Clark H. E. Howlett R. B. Tarr
J .yComstock MarionH err Virginia Tryon
RobertW. Cooper L. S. Kerr Dorothy Whipple
Evelyn J. Couglin M. A. Klaver L. L. Yost
John P. Dawson Victor W. Klein J. B. Young
H. A. Donahue Marion Koch
W. F. Elliott George E. Lardner
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
BUSINESS MANAGER .............VERNON P. HILLERY
Advertising........................F. M. Heath, A. J. Parker
Publidation ..........................Nathan W. Robertson
Accounts.............................. John J. Hamels, Jr.
Circulation ........ ....................... Herold. Hunt
-Assistants
Burr L. Robbins Richard Cutting H. Willis Heidbreder
W. Cooley James Prentss W. Kenneth Galbraith
L. Beaumont Parks Maurice Moule J. A. Dryer
Walter Scherer Alaitin Goldring Richard Heidemann
Edw. Murane Tyler Stevens T. H. Wolfe
David Park Paul Blum
TUESDAY, JANUARY 10, 1922
Night Editor-M. B. STAHL
Assistant-R. C. Moriarty
Proofreaders-R. N. Byers
M. Berman
The entire Editorial staff and tryouts will hold a
meeting at 5 o'clock this afternoon in the Press
building.
SHACKLING THE COACH
Football is over and done for this school year,
basketball is just beginning, and now we find our-
selves confronted with the prospects of another
track season. But, sadly enough, those prospects
are not of the best, for Coach "Steve" Farrell an-
nounced recently that at his first meeting but eighty-
two men had presented themselves as candidates for
the 1922 squad - and Michigan numbers among
her undergraduate body probably more male stu-
dents than any other university in the West.
We are not prone to go about waving our arms
and shouting about our deficiencies any more than
we are inclined to over-emphasize our good points.
But, if Michigan, with all her material, with all her
-alleged spirit and fight, with all her enthusiasm and
good sportsmanship, cannot turn out more than
eighty-odd men for a track squad; then some action
ought to be taken.
Michigan can count among her graduated sons
countless men of note in the track world, and a few
of high standing still remain with us. But a few
cannot uphold the athletic name of the entire Uni-
versity. Neither are coaches able to make squads
out of air and talk.

It has been said in recent times that Michigan can
no longer exist on vanishing glories, and the same
thing applies to her track work as well as to all
other forms of athletics. We of the present genera-
tion will have to sacrifice a bit for Michigan if she
is to continue to uphold her high standards of the
past. We ought to have several times eighty men
out for the squad to take care of necessary elimina-
tions among the candidates and to furnish the basis
for a truly representative team.
f campus organizations and undergraduates in
general will see to it that the coach is supplied with
nmterial from their ranks, we can place a winning
squad on the gym floor and field this year. But,
if we all fail to provide a proper turn-out, Michi-
gan had better withdraw from competition wihle
the withdrawing is good.
Our first meet comes on February 18, when we
meet Chicago in Waterman gymnuasium. What
kind of an outfit are we going to put on the floor
that night?
A CHANCE FOR AUTHORSHIP
. With few exceptions those individuals of the Uni-
versity most interested in writing seek an outlet for
their energies in campus activities or in other fields
of journalism. Experience has taught, however,
that the most interested are not always the most
able, and Michigan no doubt has in her ranks any
number of talented writers whose manuscripts are
laid in a drawer at their completion and promptly
forgotten, or potential literary artists whose nat-
ural ability so far has been neglected.

It is especially for the benefit of these undiscov-
ered writers that Chimes has instituted its first an-
nual Short Story contest. That publication wishes
to bring to light some of those forgotten manu-
scripts and to draw forth literary potentialities, so
that the work of able writers upon the campus may
be recognized and their talents developed.
The entire student body of Michigan has been in-
vited to join in the contest. But, in order to bring
out those men who so far have not been sufficiently
interested to write merely for the sake of writing,
Chimes has arranged to offer four cash prizes rang-
ing from $5o down to $io, for the four best short
stories submitted by the fifth of next April.
The Chimes' contest should prove an attractive
stimulus to many literarily inclined students on the
campus who, through it, may profitably try out their
prowess by entering a piece of fiction in the an-
nounced competition.
A SCHOOL FOR THE VARSITY
Recently the local unit of the R. O. T. C. organ-
ized the musically inclined within its ranks into a
band. Up to date about fifty men have reported for
the several practices.
The possibilities of such a band are many when
we consider the great benefit it may prove to be to
the Varsity in the future through the supplying of
material for that organization. Although our Var-
sity band is on a par with those from any of other
Conference universities, it still has room for im-
provement in the matter of drill and it is one of the
aims of the new organization to be of service to the
Varsity in this respect. A man may be a veritable
Gabriel on a horn but unless he can keep in step
and stay with the band in formation as well as in
music he is a detriment to the band as a unit.
It is entirely possible that the R. O. T. C. band
ultimately may become a recognized training school
for the Varsity. By attention being given to the
military as well as to musical proficiency, any band
can be improved in quality; and, if men have an
opportunity to drill with the R. . T2* C. a year or
so before they become eligible for the real Univer-
sity band, much can be done toward bettering the
appearance of the latter organization.
It might prove quite profitable for those who seek
to "make" the Varsity to avail themselves, of the
opportunity offered by the R. O. T. C., as the pos-
sibilities are that preference soon may be given to
those who have served their apprenticeship in the
ranks of the training school.
It is reported that an amateur golfer at Trenton,
N. J., recently drove a ball a quarter of a mile. Page
"Babe" Ruth. It seems unfair that a newcomer
should be allowed to top the ranks of the swat aris-
tocracy while one of its most able members is tem-
porarily out of the running.
With the prospects for a continuation of our
present rapid growth in the future, may we not ex-
pect a few years hence to see Michigenensians blos-
soming forth with something about double the gen-
erous proportions of Webster's unabridged?
We are thrilled by the announcement of a recent
fashion show held in Sarah Caswell Angell hall.
But then, the Junior Girls' play unfortunately is not
the only affair hereabouts from which men are ex-
cluded.
If State street speedsters keep up their present
rate, Rickenbacker, DePalma and Oldfield had bet-
ter look to their laurels.
"John Wanamaker Laughs at Report of His
Death," snickers a news head. Boy, page Lodge,
Conan Doyle, et al.
the Telescope
'Cross the Hall
When musical elfs my brain invade
When melodious strains cause gloom to fade,
When with thopin and Wagner I hold consulta-
tion,

Who starts singing "the blues", to my great con-
sternation ?
That bleating jazz hound who lives 'cross the
hall.
When I am inclined to be studious truly,
Who is it gets frightfully noisy, unruly?
When my wits from Descartes are beginning to
rattle,
Who forces his roommate into a wild battle?
That infernal pug who lives 'cross the hall.
When the phone downstairs rings and the fresh-
men are out,
I always must answer; he's never about.
But who, when I'm blue and am feeling quite sad,
Lets me drink his home brew and helps make me feel
glad?
God bless him - that angel who lives 'cross
the hall. - Erman.
It Might Be Well
In the "Program of Events" column of that fam-
oue Ann Arbor publication entitled "Where to Go",
may be seen the following:
"WATERMAN GYMNASIUM - Athletic as-
sociation practices from 7:40-9:20."
We imagine this would make an interesting spec-
tacle.
Famous Closing Lines
'My death is going to be quite a shock," said the
murderer as they strapped him into the chair.
ERM.

REDUCTIONS ON ALL

I;

615 nnJ(

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W. T M-m
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Both Stores
111lii i 1111ii111 11111 III II iiiiiiiiM

DETROIT UNITED LINES
Ann Arbor and Jackson
TIME TABLE
(Eastern Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars - 6:oo
a. i., 7:*0 a. in., 8:oo a. in., 9:oo a. m. and
hourly to g:oS p. im
Jackson Express Cars (local stops of Ann
Arbor), 9:47 a. in. and every two hours to
9:47 p. in.
Local Cars East Bound-5:S5 a.m., 7:oo a.
m. and every two hours to 9:00 p. in., i.oo
p. i. To Ypsilanti only-xti:4o p. in., 12:25
a. in., t15r a. Mn.
To Saline, change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars West Bound-7o a. fi., 2:44
p ToJackson and Kalamazoo-Limited cars:
8:47, 10:47, a. in., 12:47, 2.47, 4:47.
To Jackson and Lansing - Limited: 8:47
p. in.
1922 JANUARY 1922
'S XT W T F S
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
8 9 10 11 12 13 14
15 16 17 18 19 20 21
22 23 24 25 86 27 28
29 30 31
NOTICE TO MEN
We do all kinds of high-class Rat
work at pre-war prices. Hats turned
inside out, with all new trimmings,
are as good as nEw.
FACTORY HAT STORE
617 PACKARD STREET
Telephone 1792

Daily Want Ads Pav.-Adv.
Try a Daily Want Ad. It pays.-Adv.

Something for sale? A Classified
Ad in The Daily will find a buyer.-
Adv.

ALL MEN'S WINTER
SHOES AND OXFORDS

OFF

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STUDENTS LUNCH

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108 SOUTH MAIN STREET

409 EAST JEFFERSON

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OPEN 6:30 A. M.
TILL 11:00 P. M.

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Headquarters for
Dance andI

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ORDER FROM

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