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January 10, 1922 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-01-10

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W iJi 1 1-11
RALLY FAIR
TODAY

I

00,

Ar Aar
tr t an juat
4% "!a tu

DAY AND NIGHT Y
SERVICE

* XXXII. No. 76

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, JANUARY 10, 1922

PRICE FIVE t

0.6.0. FIVE WINS
FROM WLVERINES
BY125-22.SCORE1
UNLUCKY BREAKS KEEP CROWD,
ON EDGE THROUGHOUT ,
GAME1
MATHER'S MEN LOSE
IN CLOSING MINUTES
Individual Scoring Honors Go to Ely
With Total of Two Goals and
Ten Free Throws
Michigan lost her first Big Ten
basketball game of the year. Ohio
State university's fast moving quintet
was the victor, 25 to 22, last night in
one of the hardest fought court bat-
ties witnessed in Waterman gymnas-
ium for a long time. Coach Mather's
Wolverines outplayed the Scarlet and
Gray in actual floor work at almost
every moment of the encounter, lead-
ing at half time by a 16 to 12 count,
but three brilliant spurts by the Ohio-
ans, each netting them a pair of wellI
made field baskets, proved too much
at last.
Many Points Missed
Time after time Michigan men flash-
ed the ball toward the basket, but the
sphere exhibited a seemingly inexplic-
able aversion to dropping through the
net. Upou one occasion a beautiful
short toss by Ely arched toward the
coveted goal, perched on the back rim
of the basket, hesitated, shifted mom-
entarily from right to left, and back
from left to right-and balanced there.
Ely was the outstanding star of the
game on either team. The tall Wol-
verine center was indomitable, out-
jumping the vaunted "Tee" Young of
Ohio throughout the contest, and total-
ing 14 points on two baskets and 10
perfect free throws, the latter out of
16 gift shots. Captain Greenspun, of
Ohio, came within one of equalling
Ely's mark, scoring 13 points on three
field goals and seven free throws, the
latter out of a possible 10.
Reason, for Michigan, contributed
three excellent tosses from the field,
while Cappon handed in one. Reason
played a stellar game during the earl-
ier part of the contest, but in the sec-
ond half showed to disadvantage in
that he had difficulty in maintaining
his footing and keping his hands on
a passed ball.
Rea Closely Guarded
Captain Rea was guarded closely
from start to finish, and was given but
five opportunities to cage his famous
long distance tosses, all of which were
failures. He put up a brilliant fight, how
ever, and was given a close run for
honors by Birks, who was removed
late in the game in favor of Kipke.
With the exception of Greenspun the
only outstanding Ohio player was Dud-
ley. Young, Beard, and Robinson
fouled continually, and the two latter
were finally sent from the game on
four personals. Young's offenses were,
with one exception, of a technical na-
ture. %
Michigan took the lead at the start
and held it all through the first half
and well along in the second. With
the game drawing to a close Oio, with
the score 20 to 19 against her, passed
the Wolverines on one of her three
brilliant spurts.
ueirease Lead
The Buckeyes increased their lead
until the score stood 25 to 22. Michi-
gan rallied desperately,( sending shot
(Continued on Page Eight)
MDNIGHT FIRE DRIVES
STUDENTS FROM HOME

Fire, which broke out in the base-
ment of Ule Theta Xi fraternity house,
624 Packard street, at 11:30 o'clock
last night, did damage which will run
into the hundreds of dollars. For a
time it threatened to be much more
serious. Most of the loss was done
by the heavy smoke which choked the
house after fire chemicals were found
to be ineffective. At midnight the
blaze was extinguished after water
was thrown on the flames. It is prob-
able that an overheated furnace was
the cause. '.r
Many members of the fraternity
were in bed when the alarm was
sounded. Neighbors helped them car-
ry out much of their furniture.

Kreisler, Violinist, 2brills Large
Audience In Concert Last Night

(By Sidney B. Coates)
To hear a great artist play before
a great audience is an experience long
to be remembered,. but to hear Fritz
Kreisler, violinist, as he played last
night in Hill auditorium is an experi-
ence of a lifetime. After more than
20 years on the concert stage, the fire
burns on undiminished, and from
classic sonata to restless dance the
artist led and held his audience.
Conservative Opening
Mr. Kreisler opened with Cesar
Franck's Sonata in A major, a work
of conservative type, which showed
the violinist's almost uncanny quality
of tone and accuracy of pitch. The
work was not enthusiastic; but for
'hose who wanted the sonata played
for all it was worth, satisfaction was
rendered.
Following this came a much grand-
er work, Bach's Suite in E major, play-
ed with a vim and spirit somehow
lacking in the first number, but which
seemed to grow as the minutes carried
the artist and audience onwards. This
BURTON NID ON
FOUNDATION BOARD.
Will Help in Determining Method of
Making Awards from Woodrow
Wilson Fund
SUGrFa'rT FbTTIR FTELIS IN
WHICH PRIZES MAY BE GIVEN
President Marion K Berton has been
made a member of the Wilson founda-
tion committee, which has been ap-
nointed to determine the best method
of m1king awards from the proposed
fund. The foundation will be in hon-
or of Wooctrow Wilson, and will be
similar to the Nobel foundation but
national in its scope, and it Is the
duty of the committee to determine in
what fields of endeavor the awards
shall be made.
President Burton has suggested four
gelds as the most suitable from which
to choose men to whom t award priz-
es. His four classes are as follows,
stated briefly:
One: Elective office holders, state
or federals.
Two: Judges, state or federal.
Three: Newspaper editors.
Four: Authors in the field of so-
cial or political research.
According to the plan of the Presi-
dent, awards should be made from the
Tbove classes for especially meritori-
ous public service, according to the
9necific terms, which he gives in de-
tail.
"I am fully convinced," said the
President yesterday, "that men from
the classes I have outlined are de-
serving of special recognition, and
should be included when a final deci-
sion is reached as to the fie'ds in
which awards shall be made."
PRES, BURTON RETURNS
FROM SUCCESSFUL TRIP

classic brought more applause than
the first and please, first, because it
was Bach; second, because it was a
veteran playing the work of a veteran;
and third, because Mr. Kreisler was
getting under the surface and making
his violin give the message which he
alone knows how to give it.
Then for the first time since the
opening of the concert Mr. Kreisler
and Carl Lamson left the stage, giv-
ing time for a moment's reflection.
What is it about the gray haired, erect
Austrian that makes him succeed time
after time, makes him keep his fire and
energy year after year, and makes him
loved for his greatness as a man and
a musician? Is it the love of music
that keeps Mr. Kreisler young or does
he keep young because of his love for
folks-red-blooded folks?
Exhibits Tecnique
But he was on the stage again, this
time in his last group of selections.
In the works of Padre Martini, Mozart
and Schubert his violin passed
'hrough all manners of technical dif-
culties, and the audience was delighted
with difficult work well done. The au-
thence applauded enthusiastically and
Mr. Kreisler returned to play what to
many was the delight of the evening.
"A Song of India" by -Rimsky-Kor-
aakow - this was what Mr. Kreisler
played, and its rich cadences rolled
from the violin, giving the mystery of
the East, the beauty of a simple mel-
ody and a touch of romance. He play-
ed it once and the audience responded
from the stage to the last seat in the
second balcony. Mr. Kreisler played
it again, and again the audience re-
sponded, but what would have de-
lighted him still more would have been
to hear this song and his own "Ca-
price Viennois;" played later as an
encore, hummed and even whistled by
contented folk as they passed from
the auditorium.
After the song, came a group of
dances and caprices full of the hot
blood of the Slavic peoples. This time
as Mr. Kreisler finished number after
number, the audience applauded more
than enthusiastically; it had gotten
some of the Slav's reckless energy in-
to its blood, too.
Accompanist Was Factor
And now a word for a man who
stood by Mr. Kreisler in every phrase
and took some laurels for himself, es-
pecially in the Bach suite. Carl Lam-
son, accompanist, is another with the
lasting energy of the man he accom-
panied. He was no small factor in
making the whole evening the pleas-
ure all found it.
DAIL EIREANN REFUSES
TORDE-ELECT DE V9LER

MIMES WILL OPEN
UNION THEATER
WITH 1922, OPERA
MODERN APPLIANCES MAKE IT
POSSIBLE TO PRESENT
ANY PLAY
NEW HOUSE WILL HAVE'
"FIRST NIGHT" JAN. 27
Stage Successes Will Be Presented
There at Regular Intervals
by Men Students
Mimes will officially open the new
Union theater, which has been in the
process of construction for the past
two months, Friday, Jan. 27, offering
as the opening attraction "Make It for
Two." The seat sale will open at 3
o'clock on the afternoon of Jan. 24
at the box office of the new theater.
Due to the fact that the, house has the
limited capacity of 500, seats will be
sold only to men students and pur-
chasers will be limited to two seats
each .
Used ' br Rehearsals
The theater has been in practical
use during the period of opera re-
hearsals, ;nd with the installment of
all the appliances required for mod-
ern stage-craft, the presentation or
any modern popular play will be pos-
sible, according to Mimes' officials.
One feature of the opera perform-
ances which is unfamiliar to most
Michigan students is the song "Michi-
gan Memories," sung by Kemp Keena
from the directors' stand between acts.
This song was never presented at a
performance in Ann Arbor due to the
fact that it was not received from the
publishers until the opera had finished
its engagement here. However, it made
a tremendrous hit at performances on
the tour.
As souvenirs of the opening night,
copies of opera sheet music and sou-
venir programs will be given to the
patrons.
Following the presetation of "Make
It for Two," Mimes will offer in Feb-
ruary "The Charm School" with Ar-
thur J. Holden, '24, as the featured
player. This comedy with music has
enjoyed a degree of success on the
professional stage and has also been
done in pictures. "The Little Jour-
ney," Alma," "Where Do You Live,"
"The Climax," "Fair and Warmer,"
"The Thirteenth Chair," "It Pays to
Advertise," "The Prince Chap," and
many of the famous Weber and
Fields' burlesques will be presented
during the spring.
Tryouts Invited
All men students who are eligible
are invited to try out for cast posi-
tions in these productions. Rehears-
als and stage work will be conducted
so as not to interfere with study
hours, and no one will be accepted
for a part if, in the minds of college
authorities, his academic work does
not reach a reasonable standard.
As has been the policy of Mimes in
the pastemen studetns will assume all
of the female roles in the productions
to be given at the new theater.
Powell Writes
For Law Review

Laws Hear Talk
By Naval Officer
Beginning a series of 10 lectures on
"The Law of Admiralty," Lieut.-Com-
mander William H. Faust, '02L, for-
merly of the United States navy, and
graduate of the Naval Academy, gave
the first of the addresses yesterday
afternoon in the Law school. The se-
ries will continue daily at 4 o'clock
in room G, and will be open to all stu-
dents.
Lieut.-Commander Faust, after grad-
uating from Annapolis, entered the
navy and rose to the rank of lieuten-
ant before he resigned to take up the
study of law here, which he finished
in 1902.

NEWBERRY SPEAK
IN OWN DEFENS
ON SENATE fLO

DECLARES
OF NO'

HE WAS C(
UNLAWFUL AC
CAMPAIGN

READY TO RECEIVE
HP APPLICTIONS
First Plans for Carrying On of Fune-
tion Made at Committee Meeting
Yesterday
700 TICKETS TO BE SOLD BY
STRICT CLASS PREFERENCE
Applications for tickets to the J-
Hop may be made from 1 to 5 o'clock
tomorrow at the Hop information desk
in the lobby of the Union, it was an-
nounced yesterday by R. D. Gibson,
'23, who is in charge of tickets. Seven
hundred tickets will be sold, the price
of which will be announced tomor-
row. Anyone may apply for tickets
with the juniors, of course, having
precedence. After the juniors come
the seniors and sophomores.
Must Pay Class Dues
Applications must be sent to the
committee and it will be decided
whether or not tiae applicant is to re-
ceive a ticket. All persons having
junior credits and who have been on
the campus for two and one-half
years will be cared for first; those
juniors who have not spent their en-
tire college course on this campus
will next be provided for ;and finally
those tickets left will be sold to sen-
iors and the remaining, if any, to
sophomores. All applicants must have
paid their class dues.
At the hop committee meeting,
which was held yesterday, it was de-
cided that the hop would last from
9 to 2:30 o'clock. Plans are being
perfected and the music and decora-
tions are being provided for. As be-
fore there will be booths for the va-
rious rganizations on the campus and
for groups of independents who may
desire to have one.
General Meeting Today
A meeting of all representatives of
fraternities and house clubs will be
held at 4 o'clock at the Union today
fr the purpose of acquainting their
organizations with the rules and reg-
ulations concerning the Hop and the
house parties following, which will be
explained at this time. Applications
for booths will be received. Independ-
ent groups desiring booths will also
make their applications atthis time.
Frayer to Address Circelo Italano
Prof. William A. Frayer of the his-
tory department will lecture on "The
Unification of Italy" before the Circolo
Italianoat 8 o'clock tomorrow in the
Cercle Francais room. All Interested
in Italian affairs are cordially In-
vited.
} NOTICE TO FRATERNITIES
I I
All fraternities who do not I
I want to run the same house pc- I
tuer In the 1922 Michganensian }
that they ran last year must get I
I a new picture into the Michigan-
I ensian office by the end of this I
I week, Friday, Jan. 13. All new I
I fraternities must also get the
} picture of their house into the of- I
I flee by the above date. No ex-
tension of time will be made.
I This notice is final.'}

OPPONENTS ASK WHY
STATEMENT WITHHEI
Republican Colleagues Congratul
Him at Conclusion of Half
Hour Hearing
(By Associated Press)
Washington, Jan. 9.-Standing
his place in the senate and meet
publicly for the first time char
made in his own presence, Sena
Truman H. Newberry of Michigan
clared today that with God as his w
ness he was not conscious of a sinj
act - unlawful, dishonorable, or c
rupt - in his campaign against H
ry Ford in 1918.
Senator Walsh Questions
For exactly half an hour, with
eyes of his colleagues upon him, Se
tor Newberry read a prepared spe
without interruption. When he :
concluded, for half an hour more
was subjected to a cross-examinat
at the hands of Senator Walsh,
Montana, a Democratic member of
committee, which in a minority
port ,held he was mnt entitled to
seat.
How Senator Newberry w
through the trying ordeal was vieR
for the most part through parti
eyes. There can be no doubt that
Republican friends were jubil:
They rushed toward him as he left
crowded chamber offering congra
lations.
The Democrats later asserted t
Senator Wilson, Democrat, of Mis
sippi, had about expressed their v
when he characterized the Michi
senator's defense as "full of e
sions."
Followed Lawyer's Advice
Almost at the outset of the qu
tioning, Senator Walsh wanted
know why a statement, like that ;
given to the senate had not been mi
before. "I did not appear on
stand at the Grand Rapids trial
cause.I was not what a lawyer mil
call a good client," said Senator N
berry. "I followed the advice of
lawyer of the case who said I had
information to give," he continued
did not volunteer before the se
committee for the reason I b
given."
When pressed as to why he had
made a similar statement in respc
to a letter from his state, Sena
Newberry shot back that he' thot
there was no reason why he shc
encourage his political critics in tb
effort to defeat him.
OR LAIRDSPEAKS. ON
MARKSOF REAL M9A
SAYS MORALITY IS NECESSA
FOR ACCOMPLISHMENT OF
SCHOLARSHIP

TOUR THROUGH WESTERN CITIES I
PRODUCES DEEP IMPRESSION '
ON SECTION _
President Marion L. Burton and his'
family returned last Friday from their
three weeks' western trip. Their itin-
erary included Denver, Salt Lake City,
Los Angeles, San Francisco, Port-
land, Seattle, Missoula ,and Minneap-
olis, the President speaking in every
city on the list.
Makes 86 Addresses
In all he made 26 major addresses,
besides a number of short talks be-
fore alumni and others. He addressed
the Southern California Teachers' as-
sociation at Los Angeles, and the Ore-
gon Teachers' association at Port-
land, his other speeches being for the
most part before organizations of
alumni.
The trip of the President through
the west had a profound effect upon
the entire section, and is expected to
produce far-reaching results for posi-
tive good for the University. Every-
where he went he was reecived with
the greatest enthusiasm. Dinner par-
ties, sight-seeing trips, and all manner
of receptions marked his visits to the
various cities of the west.
The President has been quoted on
editorial pages in all sections of the
country for the statement made dur-

VOTE IS 60 TO 58 ON STRUGGLE
BETWEEN FACTIONS OF
FREE STATE
(By Associate Press)
Dublin, Jan. 9.-The Dail Eireann,
after receiving the formal resigna-
tion of Aarnon de Valera as president
of the Irish republic and refusing by
a vote of 60 to 58 to re-elect him to
that office, adjourned at 6:40 o'clock
p. m. until 11 o'clock Tuesday morn-
ing.
The adjournment came after Speak-
.er MaGNeill had ruled that a motion
made by Michael Collins, nominating
Arthur Griffith as chief executive over
a provisional government, was out of
order. Collins himself moved the ad-
journment after he had challenged
the action of the opposition as obstruc-
tion.
Austin Stacke began the afternoon
session with a laudation of de Valera,
whose nomination for the election of
president of the Irish republic, he
said he supported. Mr. Stacke called
de Valera the "biggest man in Europe
today."
Michael Collins, dealing with the
motion, for the election of President
de Valera, said that rushing a vote on
the motion might be good political
tactics from the view point of de Val-
era's side, but bad from the country's
side.
He denied that he and his associates
were abandoning the republic, and
said that if the provisional govern-
ment failed to operate it would be be-
cause of the obstacles the opponents
of the treaty would create.
He announced that, for himself, he
would vote against President de Val-
era's election, but could not say what
{ the others on his side would do.

I
l
i
3
i
s
s
t'

Again presenting the series of ar-
ticles by Prof. Thomas R. Powell, of
Columbia university, on "The Supreme
Court's Construction of the Federal
Constitution in 1920-21," the January
Law Review prints the third of the
series this month.
Another article deals with "Mutual-
ity in Speclfic Performance," by Prof.
Rdzar N. Durfee of the Law school.
Professor Durfee is one of the leading
authorities in the country on the sub-
ject of equity. The third and last ar-
ticle deals with the clause relating to
"Ex Post Facto in the Constitution."
It was written by Oliver P. Field of
St. Paul.

11

PUBLIC SALE OF BASKETBALL TICKETS
WILL DISPOSE OF REMAINING SERIES

"Scholarship must be difu.
through and through with moralil
and "the thing that will keep Amex
from accomplishing the things I
God intends for her is a lack of me
stamina," were two of the stateme
made by Dr.- John W. Laird, ne
elected president of Albion college
his address Sunday night at the fou
of the Wesleyan Guild lectures.
Dr. Laird, at whose inaugura
last spring President Marion L. E
ton gave one of the principle addr
es, paid tribute to the University
his preliminary remarks and also
of some of the ambitions he help
Albion. In developing his topic "
Marks of a Real Man," President L
took as the greatest example to
mind of a real man, Jesus.
He severely rapped the present
vorce question stating that the b
est part of the two and a half imllioi
vorces in the last 24 years was ci
ed by some form of sin. In telling v
a real man was he said that a
man will always be the master
seemingly unconquerable envi
ments both external and internal
that the only justifiable ideal that
help to overcome all environmer
to do the will of God.
Michigan Graduate Takes Offie
James E. Chenot, graduate of the
school, has been appointed assli
nrosecuting attorney in Wayne c
ty to fill the vacancy caused by
resignation of Robert T. Speed.
was formerly connected with the
of McNamara & Scallen, Detroit.
new assistant took up the dutIk
his offie. Jan. 1.

f

FRESH LITS, NOTICE r
Today and tomorrow will be
the last opportunity for the pay- I
ment of freshman lit class dues
before the fresh mixer to be held .
at 2 o'clock next Saturday aft-
ernoon at the Union.

ing his trip that "we must get rid of
war or war will get rid of civilization."
Feels Gratified
"My trip was eminently successful,"
said PresidenttBurton in an interview
yesterday. "It was of course hardly
restful, but I believe that from the
standpoint of definite results it was
extremely profitable, and will cause
positive and lasting benefit to the Uni-
versity, in that it has served to bind
the alumni of that section closer to,
the University so that they will be
more than ever zealous in its inter-

Tickets for future basketball games
will be placed on public sale today and
will be available to students and to
townspeople. There remain less than
a quarter of the tickets, which went
on sale at the beginning of the season.
Numerous requests from townspeo-
ple who are anxious to purchase tick-
ets for the future games cause officials
to believe that the tickets remaining
will be sold within a short time.
The price of the tickets in series
A has been reduced to $1.50 due to
the fact that one of the Conference
games, originally included in the ser-
ies, has been played. The series still
includes the games with Indiana, Feb.

20, and Illinois, Feb. 25, and the indoor
track meet with Chicago, Feb. 18, at
which time the track team will make
its first appearance. The price of ser-
ies B remains at $2.00 and includes
the four games including Chicago to-
night, Wisconsin, Feb. 18, Iowa, March
4, and Northwestern, March 6.
Following the sale of the tickets,
there will be no sale of tickets to the
individual games unless some of the
sci ies are not disposed of, a condition
thought improbable because of, the re-
quests received. With the sale of the
series all possible seats at the gym-
nasium will have been taken and there
will be no general admission sold.

S. C. A. Secretaries Attend Convention
Louis RPimann, Lloyd Wa'lick. and
TTward Chanman, secretairies of the
SfTi7dent Christian association. left Ann
Arbgr this morning to attend the Con-
Per'nce of Ch 'reh Workers in univer-
sities being held in Chicago today, to-

asu.

t morrow and Thursday.

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