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January 07, 1922 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-01-07

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A 5 A;-4 iviav;

GAN DAILY

OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY
. OF MICHIGAN
Published every orning ex.ept Monday during the Waiver
y yea by the Bard in Cnt I of Student Pubiations.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIA CD PRE8
The Associated Press is excduslv4'y entitled to thie s efr
publicatin of all newt dsp t cr- to it or n+ otherwse
edited in this paper and the local news published therein.
.Entered at the postroffice at Ann Arbr. Michigan, as secod
s matter.
Suscription by carrier or mail, ,so
Offices"- Anna Arbor Press buildng, Maynard Street.
Phones: Business, 960; Eitnrial. 2414.
Communications not to exceed 300 words, if signed, the sig-
time not necessarily to appear in print, but as an evidence of
th, and notices of events will be publisbed in The Daily at the
cretion of the Editor, if left at or mailed to The Dail office.
isigned communications will receive no consideration. No man-
rill be returned unless the writer incloses postage
The Daily dloes not necessarily endorse th sntiments ex-
eased in the communications.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Tephone 2414
ANAGING EDITOR......... BREWSTER P. CAMPBELL
sistant Managing Editor.................Hugh W. Hitchcock
ty Editor.................................E. P. Lovejoy, Jr.
ght Editors--
R. E. Adams M. B. Stahl
Edward Lambrecht Paul Watzel
U.,. 1ovuilmn~~
itorial Board Chairman.......................T. J. Winery
istants-
S. T. Beach E. R. Meiss
L. A. Kern Leo Hershdorfer
nday Magazine Editor...............Thornton W. Sargent, Jr.
Fchange Editor................................George E. Sloan
isic Editbr................................Sidney B. Coates
orting Editor................................ George Reindel
olnen's Editor;.............................Elizabeth Vickery
.or Editor.... .............................E R. Meiss
Assistants
'Kingsley S. Andersson L. L. renwick B. HI. Lee
Maurice Berman Doroty. cGeltz Robert M. Loeb
Cecil R, Betron 11. B. Grundy J. E. Mack
Jack D. Briscoe Sadycbth Heath Kathrine Montgomery
W.B . Butler Winona A. libbard R C. oriarty
R. . Byers - arry 1)Dlocy J F. Pontius
A. D. Clark Agnes Ilorn<;uist Lillian Scher
Harry C. Clark H.1;. Iowlett R. B. Tarr
P. Comstock Marion Kerr Virginia Tryon
Riobert W. Cooper L. S. Kerr Dorothy Whipple
Evelyn J. Couglin M. A. Kaver 1',. L. Yost
"John P. Dawson Victr W. Klein J. B. Young
i.A. Donahue MIaion Koch
W. F. Ellott George E. Lardner
BUSIN~ESS STAFk'
Telephone 960
ISINESS MANAGER............. VERNON F. HILLERY
vertising ........................F. M Heath, A. J. Parker
blication ..............................Nathan W. Robertson
count°.................................. John J. Hamels, Jr.
rculation...................................Herold C. Hunt
Assistants
irr L4. Robbins Richard Cutting H. Willis Heidbreder
. Cooley James Prentiss W. Kenneth Galbraith
Beaumont Parks Maurice Moule J. A. Dryer
alter Scherer Pdinliii oldrig Richard Heidean
1w. Murane Tyler Stevens T. H. Wolfe
David Park Paul Blumn
SATURDAY, JANUARY 7, 1922
Night Editor-G. P. OVERTON
Assistant-J. P. Dawson
Proofreaders-J. M. Bulkley
M. E. Gordon
THE LEAD, AGAIN
During the long. course of its existence the pro-
ssion of the actor has perhaps received more
use than any other pursuit. Many have been its
s and downs, and ever changing its destiny.
The drama itself, with -the exception of short
rnods of extreme puritanism such as the Crom-
ellian reign in England, has maintained through
e ages the favor of the masses as well as the
asses. Greece gave us classics in this comparable
her sculpture and architecture. Christianity in-
>duced the rudiments of the drama into its church
remnonies, and continued to develop it there until
e productions became unfit for religious pur-
ses. Corneille, Racine, and Shakespeare are the
spiring culmination of this drama which origin-
y emanated from the church.
Thus while the drama itself has remained popu-
r and respected through all this time, the lot of the
tor .has been a hard one. In Greece slaves were
e performers. In the Middle Ages soldiers or
ggars played the parts, and their vulgarities soon
rced the drama from church to market place.
his, together with the uncertain and itinerant life
hich the performers were forced to lead, shed a
ht of ill repute upon the acting profession, a
igma the remnants of which crop forth even to-

y - as in the controversy concerning Sarah
:rnhardt's admission to the French Legion of
:nor.
On the whole, however, the status of the actor
s risen steadily during the last seventy-five years.
:rhaps the best proof of this is the interest which
.iversities have taken recently in training men for
e stage. Stich an instruction would have been un-
:rd of in the early nineteenth century.
For some time now, Michigan has striven to ob-
n a workshop for the proper pursuit of her dra-
atic aspirations, and in the midst of a slow though
termined effort upon the part of her student body
raise funds for this purpose, has come the an-
uncement that University appropriation is to be
ide for practical instruction in the drama.
The approval of definite plans for the erection of
large campus theater and an open air theater to
built in the near future brings the realization of
,reat progressive step into view. During the past
w years Michigan with her Union has set the pace
other universities planning like institutions. And
w she is again about to take the lead -- this time
dramatics.
THE CHANGE OF A CENTURY
Viscount Bryce in the introduction to his newest.
>k "Modern Democracies" states that a century
o there was in the old world but one tiny spot in
itzerland in which the workings of democracy
ild be noticed. Within thie hundred years that
w lie behind us nearly all of the monarchies have
nged to the newer form of government and the
ve of free institutions has spread through most
Europe and part of Asia.

When the American republic began its national
life in 1789 the only materials which history furn-
ished to its founders were those which the republics
of antiquity had inaugurated. From 1789 to 1799
the world passed into a new phase but these ten
years were for France years of revolution in which
democracy had no chance to make a beginning. It
was in the United States only that popular govern-
ment could be profitably studied.
But twenty new republics have sprung up in the
western hemisphere during the past century. Five
new democracies have been developed out of colo-
nies within the British dominion. Four great em-
pires in Europe as well as a fifth in Asia all ruled
by ancient dynasties have recently crashed to the
ground and efforts are being made to build up out
of the ruins new states each of which is enacting
for itself a democratic instrument of government.
The latest development is the granting of a new
constitution for Ireland which if ratified, as it ap-
pers certain it will be, will give Ireland a demo-
cratic form of government.
The above clearly indicates that free institutions
which years ago were looked on with ridicule by the
ruling classes of Europe, and later with fear as they
became more of a reality, are now favored the world
over. Previous to 1914 the sprad of democratic
forms of government had been consistently taking
place. It took only the recent war to complete the
marvelous change that has taken place during the
past century.
CARVE, SENIORS, CARVE
In the old days, when when Joe's and the Orient
flourished and were the gathering places of the male
members of the University, students were wont to
decorate the tables of these places with their names.
Every table was a mass of cognomens and sculp-
tural activity. The carving of these names was
more than a mere idle pastime. It was done so that
when the author might return, perhaps years later,
the sight of that table-top might bring back tender
memories of his Alma Mater, might recall old
friends, and revive old scenes. But time passed; and
times changed, and Joe's and the Orient vanished.
But so revered were the old table-tops that they were
removed to the tap-room of the Union, where they
now adorn the ceiling.
The old tables are filled, but the tap-room tables
have replaced them and during the last few years
have been covered with scores of names. The call
has come for the seniors, who are the only ones so
privileged, to make their mark. So, carve, seniors,
carve.
Radical changes in military drill are rumored to
be taking place in Ann Arbor. Those who have ob-
served the secret maneuvers make the astounding
statement that "four abreast" instead of "five
abreast" while on campus walks, is now the rule
followed by Michigan amazons.
Iie Telescope
The Muse Has Come - to Someone Else
Sometimes I feel inspired to write
A funny skit or mirthful squib,
One that would make a solemn judge
Unroot his jaw or split a rib.
But somehow when I get all set
My pen well poised for rhymed flight,
I find that some more brilliant guy
Has written what I'd hoped to write.
-Zeke.
Then and Now
The Daily recently announced that "the Summer
Session of '94 announced a strong program, lan-
guages and science being particularly effective."
Professor Wenley's "Philosophy I" is no doubt a
continuation of one of these "strong language"
courses.
Quoth Eppie Taff:
Here lies Tom Finn

Of gambling fame,
Held six cards in
A poker game.
-Delia Selfagoodhand.

:'itP1l1111l111Ii1t1111111ttI11I11t111i1111Iti1llllll111111111t1111111t1tt111111Iltllltlllllllltl111111111illlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllttllllllllllllllillll
IRE:DUCTIONSI ON ALL
2X
e"
G RA A MS Bth Sore

4

DETROIT UNITED LINES
Ann Arbor and Jackson
TIME TABLE
(Eastern Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars - 6:oc,
a. in., 7:oo a. in., 8:oo a. m., 9:oo a. in. and
hourly to 9:o5 p. in.
Jackson Express Cars (local stops of Ann
Arbor), 9:47 a. m. and every two hours to
9:47 p. in.
Local Cars East Bound-5:55 a.m., 7:00 a,
m. and every two hours to 9:oo p. m., 11.00
p. m. To Ypsilanti only--r:4o p. in., 12:25
a. in,, 1 :1r5 a. in.
To Saline, change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars West Bound-7:50 a. m., a:4c
p. in.
To Jackson and Kalamazoo-Limited cars:
8:47, 10:47, a. mn., 12:47P 2.47, 4:4n'
To Jacksot and Lansing - Limited:8:47
p. in.

1922
S
1
8
22
29

M
2
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16
23
80

JANUARY
T W T
3 4 5
10 11 12
17 18 19.
24 25 26
31

F
6
13
20
27.

1922
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Special Showing!!
AYRES & SMITH
English Caps
711 N. University
ALL MEN'S WINTER
SHOES AND OXFORDS

__

NOTICE TO MEN
We do all kinds of high-class Hal
work at pre-war prices. Hats turned
ins de ont, with all new trimmings
are as good as new.
FACTOR" HAT STORE
617 P ACARD STREET
Telephone 1792
Heazlquarters for
Dance. and
Banqu et
]Programs
De Luxe
New Lines in
Paper, Leather, Wood
and Celluloid
the
Mayer-Schairer
company
112 South Main Street

OFF

Wa h r9s

Shoe

Store

108 SOUTH MAIN STREET

_ U

OI c
Cg wri
take wi
s J
U t' e wo i
6Y2 bs.,
of a big
now forr

Clearance Sale

of

)NA is the type-
ter you can fold up,
ih you, typewrite
simplest, sturdiest,
writing machine in
Id. Corona weighs
yet does the work
machine. Phone
a demonstration

All Winter Hats

and Tams

at

Sensational
Redu etions

OR CALL ON

Dark and Dreary
Yesterday was a particularly sad and morbid
Wasn't it? Yes, it was; and maybe that's the
son why two "Eppie Taff's" slipped into this
umn yesterday.

day.
rea-
col-

0. D. MORRILL
17 NICKELS ARCADE
Other makes of typewriters taken In
exchange. Typewriters of leading
makes bought, sold, rented, exchanged,

PIJYEAR & HENTZ
828 SOUTH MAIN ST.

cleaned and repaired. f

Glimerck
There was a young maid-named Priscilla.
The wind and the snow always chilla.
She was driving her Haines
Without any chains,
When the ice at the corner did spilla.
Ichabod.
It Deserves Worse Than That
Dear Erm:
The following story won me -a pass to the Junior
Girls' play.
Brown, known as the man with the shortest mem-
ory, was quietly observing the slow passage of the
silvery clouds overhead, when he suddenly turned
about to a friend.
"Do you know Frank Smith?" he asked.
"Who?' 'replied the surprised friend.
"What?" was the answer. -Erman.
Famous Closing Lines
"This is the end of me," said the dog, wagging his
tail. ERM.

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