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January 07, 1922 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-01-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

E WEATHER
AND RISING TE31-
PERATURE

L

Ink6iFau46Mit

LJL

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIRE
SERVICE

'. XXXII. No.- 74

i

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, JANUARY 7, 1922

PRICE FIVE CENTS

DE VALERA QUITS
AS PRESIDE-NT OF

IRISH REPUBLIC

DECLARES TO DAIL EIREANN HIS
CONFIDENCE IN COUNTRY'S
SUPPORT
CABINET'S RESIGNATION
TENDERED AT SAME TIME
Officials Close to Lloyd George Con-
sider Action as Recognition
of Defeat
(By Associated Press)
Dublin, Jan. 6.-Eamon de Valera
resigned the presidency of the Irish
republic today, presenting also to the
Dail Eirean the resignation of the
cabinet. He told the Dail he would
offer himself for re-election, standing
on the principles of 1916.
Mr. de Valera said he must have a
cabinet which thought with him, and
he would demand that all resources be
given him to defend the republic.
House Must Choose Successor
Continuing, President de Valera
said: "I propose to lay down my of-
lice ,and the house must decide by con-
stitutional means who is the chief ex-
ecutive." He then offered the Dail his
resignation, saying: "And with it goes
the ministry."
De Valera today told interviewers
that he was sick at heart and that,
whatever happened, he intended to re-
tire to private life. He spoke with
great feeling and with tears" in his
eyes, when he protested he had never
been a pa ty to any political trickery.
Griffith Protests
Arthur Griffith protested to the
speaker that the Dail could not dis-
cuss Mr. de Valera's proposal until the
treaty had been voted on. Mr. de Va-
lera protested that a vote could not be
taken while the Dail lacked a chief ex-
ecutive. Speaker McNeill sustained
Mr. Griffith's position. '
Mr. de Valera said he believed only,
by combining the treaty with his al-
ternative proposal could the country
be kept together. If the treaty went
through there surely would be a re-
volt against the British government,
he declared.
"Thank God," he exclaimed, "I'll
never be a British, citizen. I'll die
first."
London, Jan. 6.-News of Eamon de
Valera's decision today to resign as
president of 'the Irish republic was
considered at Prime Minister Lloyd
George'saofficial residence as a good
sign, in the sense that it indicated Mr.
de Valera's recognition that his cause
was lost, and' that the supporters of
" the Anglo-Irish treaty would prevail.
A telegram was immediately dispatch-
ed to Mr. Lloyd George at Cannes.
STATE ACADEMY OF SCIENCE
TO MEET HERE NEXT MARCH
The Michigan Academy of Stience
will hold its annual meeting here this
year March 29-31 ,at the same time
that the Michigan Schoolmasters' club
holds its meeting.
The Academy of Science is made up
of a number of sections drawn from
the departments of zoology, botany,
physics, mathematics, medicine, agri-
culture, economics, geology and geog-
raphy, physics, and archaeology, of
the various colleges of Michigan. Pa-
pers will be read by members of each
section.
Prof. A. Franklin Shull, of the zool-
ogy department, who is president of
the organization, will deliver the
opening address, his subject being
"The Factor of Safety In Research."
1922 LITERARY CLASS
Members of the senior liter-
ary class who have not yet paid
thefir dues :please mail check
for $2 to the treasurer at 2107
Washtenaw at once. Enclose self-
addresses and stamped envelope
for receipt. The list of paid and
unpaid seniors will be posted
next week in the Registrar's of-
flee. All dues received before
next Wednesday will be on this
r list.,
C. MAURICE ATKINSON,
Treasurer.

'Ensian Editor
Sets May15 As
Delivery Date
James G. Frey, '22, managing editor
of the Michiganensian, announced yes-
terday that this year's iEnsian will be
ready for delivery on May 15. This
will be the earliest' that the publica-
tion has ever been out and only care-
ful planning on the part of the staff
has made it posisble to promise sub-
scribers such an early delivery of the
annual number.
In establishing this date for delivery
of the 'Ensians it has been necessary
to make Jan. 28 the abso.lute deadline
for all group pictures. Any organiza-
tions which have not had their sittings
before this date will not be able to
have their cut in the 1922 number.
JUDGE LINDSEY,
SPEAKS TON I6HT
Subject of Well Known Authority on
Juvenile Delinquency to Be
"Why Kids Lie"
WORK IN DENVER COURT HAS
BROUGHT WIDE REPUTATION
Judge Ben B. Lindsey, who is to
speak on the Oratorical association
lecture course at 8 o'clock tonight in
Hill- auditorium on the subject, "Why
Kids Lie", is heralded as one of the
most popular speakers who will ap-
pear here this year. His activity as
judge of the juvenile court of Denver,
Colo., for more /than 15 years has
placed him am6ng the leading author-
ities on child delinquency.
Perhaps his greatest achievement
has been the establishment of the first
juvenile court in America equipped
with unlimited power to tr-y all cases
involving adult persons offending
against a child. The establishment of
this court I the result of nearly 10
years experience and speciaf'work for
the correction and protection of the
city's youth.
Uses New Practice
The fundamental principle of this
court is probation. Working on this
basis, Judge Lindsey has established a
new practice in committing boys and
young men to reform schools through-
out the state of Colorado by allowing
them to travel to these schools unat-
tended after being sentenced.
In 1911 Judge Lindsey was selected
as the American to advise the com-
mission representing European powers
on the conservation of child popula-
tion. His report aided in the forma-
tion and establishment of children's
courts in many of the larger European
cities. Japan is establishing juvenile
courts closely modeled after that first
instituted by Judge Lindsey.
Keeps Confidence
Upon one occasion, rather than be-
tray the confidenec of a boy who had
come to him and told him of the inci-
dents of the shooting which occurred
after a marital difficulty between his
parents, Judge Lindsey refused to be-
tray the boy's confidence and was fin-
ed $500 for contempt of court, which
he promptly paid.
He has so conducted his court dur-
ing his years of service that no charge
has ever been made by arent or child
that any of his decisions or acts have
ever been arbitrarily unfair or un-
just.
WOMEN DISPLAY'
VARIOUS STYLES
Styles for those who wear the mod-
est attire and fashions for the daring
were all displayed at the style show
given as a part of the Women's league
party yesterday afternoon in Sarah
Caswell Angell hall. Marjorie Pound-
stone, '24 Sc. of M., played an ac-
campaniment on the piano while the

following girls appeared in the revue:
Gladys Gage, '25, Iline Fischer, '23,
Elizabeth Malloy, '25, Margaret Sim-
mons, '23, Anita Sower, '23, Ruth
Sturmer, '24, and Carribel Schmidt, '23.
After the style show Mrs. R. H.
Dimock and Mrs. Withred Cook, assist-
ed by girls from the Reigh house
served tea. Music for dancing was
furnished in the gymnasium by the
orchestra from Helen Newberry house.
This party had the largest attend-
ance of the year.

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JUDGE BEN B. LiNDSEY, WELL KNOWN AUTHORITY ON CHILD DE-
LINQUENCY WHO SPEAKS ON "WHY KIDS LIE," TONIGHT IN HILL
AUDITORIUM.

Sundwall Plans
Health Center
At University
A health center-not a regular hos-
pital, but a place adapted to caring
for students who are ill, where they
will be encouraged to come for prompt
and efficient treatment-that is what
Dr. John Sundwal, director of the
newly created Department of Physical
Welare, plans for Michigan students.
In an interview recently Dr. Sund-
wall said that he was not able to dis-
close definite plans of how the idea
wouldmaterialize, pending further ap-
propriations from the state. However,
he is not satisfied with the present
arrangements for handling student
health problems. "Colds, for in-
stance,' 'he explained, "occur in great
(Continued on Page Eight)
SE U OWORK,
COACHES TELL MEN
Yost and Farrell Make Plea for More
Real Interest in
'Athletics
SCHEDULE FOR '22 TRACK
SEASON IS ANNOUNCED
A strong plea for men who are
willing to turn out and work for
their school -was made last night by
Coaches Fielding H. Yost and "Steve"
Farrell at the meeting for track can-
didates held in the lecture room
of the Physics building last night.
Only 82 men turned out despite the
effort that had been made to secure
a larger attendance.
Coach Yost, in giving out the 1922
schedule, said: "Unless more men
..ome out and participate in athleti-
ics, and this doesn't mean track ony,
Michigan's athletic reputation is
doomed. The material is in school,
but we have to find some method to
get it out.Y
The schedule follows:
Indoor meets-Feb. 18, Chicago at
Ann Arbor; March 4, Indoor Relays
at Illinois; March 18, Indoor West-
ern Conference at Evanston; March
25, Cornell at Ithaca.
Outdoor meets - April 22, Drake
Relays at Des Moines, Iowa; April
28-29, Pennsylvania Relays at Phila-
delphia (entry pending; May 6, Ohio
State at Ann Arbor; May 13, Illinois
at Ann Arbor; May 20, Chicago at
Chicago; June 2-3, Western Confer-
ence meet at Iowa City; June 17,
National Collegiate Athletic associa-
tion meet at Chicago.
PROF. VAN ZWALUWENBERG
TO BE BURIED TOMORROW
Funertal of Member of MedIcal School
Faculty Will Be Held
Privately
Dr. James G. Van Zwaluwenberg,
professor of roentogenology in the
Medical school, who died Thursday
morning in the University hospital
after a brief illness with pneumonia,
will be buried Sunday afternoon. The
funeral is to be +prvate.
The Van Zwaluwenberg home will
be open to friends and former col-
leagues from 2 to 4 o'clock this aft-
ernoon.

OVERTIME BA9TTLE
FROM MIAHOS FIlE
EXTRA PERIOD GIVES MICHIGAN
27-26 VICTORY OVER
VISITORS
CAPTAIN REA MAKES
6 GOALS FROM FLOOR

Gilkey is Star for Aggles,
In Twenty Points for
His Team

BOOSTERS COMMITTEES
ORGANIZATION OF BODY SEPA-
RATED INTO TEN DEPART-
MENTS
Standing committees for the Mich-
igan Boosters association were an-
nounced,yesterday by the board of di-
rectors and the men appointed were
notified to assume their duties at
once. These committees will officiate
throughout the year, although the
men engaged on them will be expect-
ed to serve on other committees from
time to time. Every man in the or-
ganization has received an appoint-
ment according to number.
Aigler Is Chairman
Prof. Ralph W. Aigler, of the Law
school, is the chairman of the asso-
ciation and C. W. Graham will repre-
sent town interests.
The committee on activity cam-
paigns will be composed of all the
Boosters under the seven directors;
the committee to entertain high school
athletes will have Frank W. Steketee,
'22, director; A. B. Sunderland, '22,
master of records; and Seward S.
Cramer, '23, assistant. Boosters from
number 13 to 37 will be on this com-
mittee.
The committee to entertoin visiting
teams includes Jerome Dunne, '24L,
director; C. A. Hummer, '23, and Rob-
ert Adams, '24L, assistants, and Boos-
ters from number 38 to 78; the com-
mittee on band movements has Seth
R. Bidwell, '24L, director+ ;and M. B.
Stahl, '23, assistant, with Boosters
from number 79 to 108.
The loyalty committee, to support
teams, consists of Alfred L. May, '22E,
director; and A. 0. Cuthbert, '22E, as-
sistant, with Boosters from number
190 to 200.
The Coach day committeb, is com-
posed of W. B. Rea, '22, H. A. Vick,
'24M, W. H. Simmons, '22E, Paul Goe-
bel, '23E, and James G. Frey, '22, with
Boosters from 109 to 148,
Alumni to Be Welcomed
The hearth fires committee to wel-
come alumni has Elton E. Wieman,
'21, director; Louis Reiman, '17, with
Boosters from 1 to 200; the organiz-
ing committee is under J. C. House,
'24L, with Boosters from 149 to 168;
traditions committee is under Bron-
son Brant, '22E, with Boosters from
1 to 12; and the committee at large
is composed of Boosters from 150 to
189.
The organization is at present plan-
ning a mammoth loyalty meeting to
be held early in the spring, at which
all of Michigan's All-American men
will be present and will be presented
with tokens of admiration.

NOTED VIOLINIST WILL
IYE CONCERT MONDAY
FRITZ KREISLER TO APPEAR ON
CHORAL UNION
SERIES
Fritz Kreisler appears on the Chor-
al Union concert course at 8 o'clock
Monday evening in Hill auditorium.
He is an artist whose success and mes-
sage have made him popular, and his
popularity increases with each appear-
ance.
The famous violinist was born at
Vienna, Feb. 2, 1875. He was the son
of a physician and musical amateur.
who taught him in early childhood and,
encouraged him to develop his great
natural talent. At the age of 10 he
won the# gold medal and first prize
for violin playing of the Vienna con-
servatory. By the time he was 12 he
had won the Premier Grand Prix (gold
medal) at the Paris conservatory, de-
feating 40 competitors of 20 years and
older.
After further study he visited the
United States and made a concert
tour with Moritz Resenthal, the pian-
ist, 1888-89. He then returned to Vi-
enna, where he completed his general
education ,took a course in medicine
and then studied art in Paris and
Rome.
He made his mature debut in Berlin
in March, 1899. From 1899 to 1901
he toured the United States with great
success. Since that time he has made
tours of the continent, England and
America with ever increasing suc-
cess, chiefly because of his superior
qualities as an interpretive artist. It
is also said of him that his programs
are more varied than those of any
other violinist.
He participated in the Galician cam-
paign of 1914 as an officer in the Aus-
trian army and was wounded. Since
his recovery he has toured the United
States and Europe with phenomenal
success, and his visit to Ann Arbor
during the present season marks one
of the high points of the musical sea-
son.
JUNIOR ADVISORS TO RETURN
QUESTIONNAIRES BY JAN. 15
Questionnaires have been mailed to
all Junior advisors. These are to be
filled out and returned to Margaret
MacIntyre, '23, chairman of the jun-
ion advisory committee, before Jan. 15,
together with remarks and suggestions
for carrying on the work more effec-
tively. The committee urges that this
be attended to as soon as possible so
that further plans may be made.

In a hard fought and closely re-
fereed game in which a live minute
over-period was necessary before a
decision could be reached, Michigan's
Varsity basketball team defeated the
M. A. C. five last night by a score of
27 to 26.
When the final whistle blew at the
end of the two regular 20 minute per-
iods, the score stood at a 23-all tie.
It was immediately after the game was
resumed in the oveitime that the
Varsity put the game away. Two bas-
kets, one by Ely from underneath the
basket after some clever passing from
Kipke, and the other by Kipke on a
fast dribble down the floor, gave Mich-
igan a four point lead which was just
one point more than M. A. C. could
overcome. Three free throws by Gil-
key in as many attempts gave the
Farmers their only points in the extra
period.
Play Strong Floor Gamie
Michigan played a 'stronger floor
game than did the Aggies. She took
the offensive throughout the entire
game and had the ball in her posses-
sion the major part of the time. The
passing was good with occasional mo-
ments of brilliant individual work on
the part of each man.
Captain Rea, playing his first game
of the season at forward, three six bas-
kets from the field for the -largest
number of the evening. Another point
earned by a free throw made him the
high point manfor Michigan. Shortly
after the start of the game he found
his tossing eye and proceeded to sink
the ball from the middle of the floor
with apparent ease. Ely and Xipke
each contributed four points froni the
floor and Reason turned in two more.
Ely's record from the foul line show-
ed four out of eleven.
Diminutive Forward Scores
For the Aggies, Gilkey was the star.
This diminutive forward turned in 20
of his team's 26 points. Three field
goals and 14 free throws out of 19 at-
tempts made him the high scorer of
the game. He was more elusive than
any of his teammates and with Foster,
the tall Aggie center, was the only
Farmer to break into the scoring col-
umn.
That the Michigan defense was good
is evidenced by the fact that the Ag-
gies were able to make but six bas-
kets from the floor. Birks and Cap-
pon covered their men as well as
could be desired and aided by the five
man defense held the much vaunted
Heasley scoreless. From appearance
to date Michigan has its usual strong
defensive team. Mather may be count-
ed on to turn out an air tight five.
What was really lacking last night
as far as the Michigan team was con-
(Continued on Page Eight)

COPY OF ORIGINAL DANT E MANUSCRIPT
NOW ON WAY TO UNIVERSITY LIBRARY

President Marion L. Burton has re-
ceived a communication notifying the
University of the shipment of a fac-
simile reproduction of the Codice Tri-
vulziano, presented to this University
in commemoration of the six-hun-
dredth anniversary of the death of
Dante, Sept. 14, 1921.
The Codice Trivulziano is the orig-
inal manuscript of Dante's "Divina
Commedia", transcribed 16 years aft-
er the death of the poet. No manu-
scripts in Dante's own handwriting
are known to be in existence, the
Codice Trivulziano being copied from
an original. It is in perfect condi-
tion, even to' the parchment. The
Gothic lettering and the magnificent
coloring are unimpaired.
By means of color photography a
number of perfect fac-similes have

been made, reproducing in every de-
tail the perfection of the lettering and
the embellishment. Even the colors
used in the original are faithfully re-
produced.
The copy which will be received by
this University is one of 70 being pre-
sented to the chief American univer-
sities, the President of the United.
-States for the White House library,
and to the Congressional libary. They
are distributed under the official su-
pervision of the Dante Society of Italy
by the Italians of the United States.
Owing to technical difficulties, no
more than the 390 copies struck off in
commemoration of Dante's sexcenten-
ary will be made, so that the copy re-
ceived will be a valuable addition to
the library of the University, accord-
ing to Dr. Frank E. Robbins, assist-
ant to the President.

Today

Why
Judge

Kids

Li e"

By

Ben

B.

Lindsey

Today
GENERAL ADMISSION $1.00

8 'O'Clock

a

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