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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

December 15, 1921 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-12-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

___
,

KODAK FINISHING
Flashlights and
Outside Groups
EASTMAN KODAKS AND FILMS
IJADLISIED 1905
719 N. UNIVERSITY

Holiday
OVERNIGHT BAGSt
WEEK END BAGS
BRIEF CASES
COLLAR BAGSl
SILK SHIRTS
FANCY HDKFS.
LINEN HDKFS.
SILK NECKWEAR
KNIT NECKWEAR
SILK HOSIERY;
SILK AND WOOL
HOSIERY
WOOL HOSIERY

Hints

CANES
UMBRELLAS
UNDERWEAR
HATS
CAPS
SUITS
OVERCOATS
GLOVES
JEWELRY
SPORT COATS
BATH ROBES
PAJAMAS

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MICHIGAN NAVAL
RESERVE FORCE
TO NUMBER 2, 0
COMMANDER R. T. BRODHEAD, OF
iiETROIT, EXPLAINS NEW
ORGANIZATION
RIECLASSIFICATION DUE
TO STRINGENT FINANCES'
First Division of Militia Formed in
Detroit in 1892; One in Sag-
inaw Soon After
(By Associated Press)
Detroit, Mich., Dec. 14.-The United
states Naval Reserve Force in Michi-
gan, outgrowth of the state naval mil-
itia, will have a membership of more
than 2,000 by the first of the year,
when the period for reclassification
of the reservists under the recent navy
department order expires, in the opin-
ion of Lieutenant Commander R. T.
Brodhead of Detroit, senior naval re-
serve officer and head of the organiza-
tion in Michigan.
Reclassification of the reserves was
made necessary because the navy de-
partment temporarily lacks funds I
with which to pay men on inactive
duty. Under the order men in classes
two, three, four and five are dismissed
from the service and given an opbor-
tunity to re-enter in class six, the
naval reserve. In the reserve they are
serving without pay except for drills
or equivalent duty and for their ser-
vice during the annual cruises. A
proposed new law providing funds for
maintenance of a naval reserve has
been drawn by prominent naval offi-
cers at Washington and will be sub-
mitted to the present congress, accord-
ing to information received here.
First Militia 40 Years Ago
The first naval militia was organ-
ized in eastern states 40 years ago
The first division of the militia was
formed in Detroit in 1892. Soon after-
ward a division was organized in Sag-
inaw, another in Detroit, and later on
divisions in Benton Harbor, Hancock
Traverse City and Menominee. A lit-
tle later two more were added to the
Detroit quota.
At the start the reserves were class-
ed as naval militia and were under
state control. the government furnish-
ing equipment. In 1916 the govern-
ment organized the naval militia and
the men were placed under federal
control, being subject to both federal
and state call in case of emergency.
When war was declared against Ger-
many, reserve members experienced
in duties of men aboard vessels were

placed on various craft, and served
during the war. Those with less ex-
perience were used in coast defense
service or sent to naval schools.
Present Reserves Organized in 1918
The Reserves as at present consti-
tuted were organized in 1918. Under
the arrangement now prevailing the
government furnishes all equipment.
lothing and pay for Reserve members,
the state providing armories or other
places for drilling and housing equip-
men. The Reserves are subject to call
in case of emergency by either the
otMte or federal governments, the or-
I'anization bung intended as a branch
of tlip national defense "standing be-
hind the National Guard."
There are 12 units of the reserve in
Th'hi-an at present, each unit hav-
{nz 65 or more men. In addition to
four units in Detroit there is one unit
each in Benton Harbor, Grand Rapids
Mnskezon. Traverse City, Hancock
Mt. Clemens. Saginaw and Ann Arbor.
The Ann Arbor unit is composed of
University students.
Annual Cruises Important
The anneal cruises are an mfnort-
ant part of the training of thn Michi-
'an Reserves. The U. S. S. Yantic, a
wooden gunboat, is stationed here for
training purposes and is used for mak-
"nT the cruises, eight of which were
made last summer. Many of the Re-
serves in the state took advantage of
'me of these trips, which took the
vessel into every part of the Great
sakes. A new steel ship is to replace
the Yantic next spring. Commander
Trodhead has been advised by naval
-stficials. Men makine the cruises re-
ceive from $16 to $85.for the two
(Continued on Page Eight)
Buy your tickets now.
ilillitit ll t ,1111111 Ii 1111111111111 Iii111111
TAKE IN the Sisson
during your Holidays!
Greatest place to dance
in Chicago - every Wed-
nesday and Saturday.
You meet all the old
friends a thc: Sisson in
Chicago.
Dinner including-dancing $1.50
The famous
Sisson Society Syncopators
Lake Michidan at Fifty-third Street
n!!1111 11111 !1 !!!11! 1111l1!!!ll lti!!!1!1!

d

INDIVIDUAL BOXES
Wadhams & Company
TWO STORES

STATE STREET

MAIN STREET

Ue

An Advertiser's Earn-
est Request to All
of the Readers of<
Advertising
By J. R. HAMILTONj
Former Advertising Manager of Wanamaker's, Philadelphia
In spite of all of its drawbacks, advertising is many times
over the cheapest method of marketing goods.
And the principal drawback of advertising is the nonreading
public. It costs many times more than it ought to simply because
you have not acquired the habit of consciously reading the ads.
It costs that much more to put- an idea into your heads subcon-
sciously than it would if you received that idea consciously and
willingly.
Now why don't you do your share toward lowering the cost
of marketing merchandise
Practically every standard thing you buy is an advertised
article. And it is always cheaper because it is advertised. The
volume and the distribution more than make up for the advertising
cost. You can't send a salesman around from door to door as
cheaply as you can a newspaper.
But the pity of it is that most advertisers have got to get'
their ideas into your mind when you are not looking. The greater
part of advertising impression is subconscious impression. Your
eye registers the thought against your will.
If you would only learn to read consciously and even eagerly
what an automobile manufacturer or a clothing merchant or a
shoe store has to say about its product you would bring down the
cost of each article immeasurably.
After you have read what a man has to say for his product,
whether he be a retailer or a manufacturer, then you measure
the goods themselves up against his claims for them, and in a
very short time you know where to get the best of everything.
It is all so simple. It is such a money-saver; it is such a
time-saver. And since every good thing you buy, you do buy
through advertising, whether you know it or not, why not look
for the advertising instead of making it constantly look for you.
If you will do this, the whole problem will be simplified
Immediately. The advertiser will not spend sixty per cent of
his money trying to get your attention. He will already have it
aud he will be able to devote his entire attention to his selling
ialk. When this is done, the selling cost of everything will again
be lowered and you, the buying public, will be the ones to gain
tw benefit.
Advertising as it is, is a so-much-cheaper method of sales-
wanship that the nonadvertiser is simply clinging on by his
teeth. So think how much cheaper every product is going to be,
when the cost of selling is again reduced and you learn to turn
willingly to the ads.
Get the habit now-for your own sake.
(Copyrighted.)

T HOUSANDS of smokers have proved it-and now
give the-verdict to you-
Of all the other tobaccos NATURE has produced
-none can approach the finest varieties of pure Turkish
for cigarettes-
None has the delicious FLAVOR of the finest Turkish-
None gives the ENJOYMENT of the finest Turkish-
None vrill SATISFY you as will the finest Turkish-
None but the highest grade and personally selected
Turkish tobaccos is used in MURAD.
To enjoy 100% pure
Turkish at its VERY
BEST-to reach the
APE A K - of Cigarette
Quality-you have but
to smoke MURAD-
'ATTry MURAD to-
day, and
"Judge for
Yourself-!"
20C
S. AN A R GY R
CAWA $STOCK O'.? 98 P L C '-
AA
( e,' f '

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