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December 15, 1921 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-12-15

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THE WEATHER
CLOUDY; PROBABLY SNOW
FLURIES TODAY

Yl r.

i 'is.I.-

4:Iatg

ASSOCIATED
PRES
DAY AND NIGHT WIRE
SERVICE

VOL. XXXII. No. 69

ANN ARBOR., MICHIGAN. THURSDAY, DECEMBER 15, 1921

PRICE FIVE CN'0

------a-

WONDER STORY OF
MEDICINE TO BE
TOLOJINMICHIGAN
NOTED PHYSICIANS CONFERWITH
'PRESIDENT BURTON
ABOUT CAMPAIGN
PLAN IS TO ASSEMBLE
BUREAU OF SPEAKERS
Work of Joint Committee Will Be Sub-
mitted to State Medical Society
for Approval
-An educational campaign to ac-
quaint every citizen of the state of
Michigan with the wonder story of
modern medicine and its vital relation
to the health and happiness of every
individual, is to be launched in the
near future if the plans discussed
Tuesday by President Marion L. Bur-
ton and representatives of the Uni-
versity and State Medical society be-
come realties.
Dr. Hugh Cabot, dean of the Medi-
cal school, Dr. G. Carl Huber, of the
Medical school, Dr. John Sundwall,
head of the departments of public
health and physical education, and
Prof. W. D. Henderson, head of the
extension division, represented the
University.
Dr. W. J. Kay, of Lapeer, president
of the State Medical society, and Dr.
J. B. Kennedy and Dr. Angus Mc-
Lean of Detroit, represented the med-
ical profession of the state. They also
form the executive committee of the
State Medical society's committee on
legislation and public policy.
Meeting Result of State Action
The meeting was the direct outcome
of the action taken by the State Med-
ical society at its annual meeting in.
Bay City, at which it committed itself
to a bampaign of public education
along medical lines. The aid of the
state board of health and certain
state-wide voluntary health agencies
will be requested in carrying out the
-program.
The University, through its exten-

Three elaborate Settings Built For
Comedy Club 's Play, Pygmalion"

Comedy club play, "Pygmalion," to'
be given here Jan. 18, will include
three distinct and elaborately con-
structed stage settings, contracted for
by 0. S. Davis, of Detroit, who has
been for some years general stage de-
signer for Comedy club productions.)
The settings will include the portico
of St. Paul's cathedral at midnight in
a London fog, a decidedly ornate re-
ception room of the mid-Victorian,
period, and (particularly familiar to
University students) a professor's lab-
oratory, that of Henry Higgins, who
is carrying on research work in pho-
netics.

"Pygmalion" will be the first of
Bernard Shaw's plays to be attempted
by amateurs at the University. Almost
every member of the cast has taken
prominent parts in previous campus
dramatics, including several previous
leads. The play will be presented in
several Michigan cities following its
presentation here, by permission of
the committee on student affairs.
Jackson, Battle Creek, and Grand
Rapids may be included in the tour,
and-it is possible that the invitation
to take the play to Port Huron will
be accepted for the semester vacation.

sion division, will co-operate
public health agencies by

with the
placing

more emphasis in future upon lec-
tures from the Medical school.
The plan which will probably be
followed calls for a program commit-
tee to assemble a bureau of speakers
from members of the University Med-
ical faculty and prominent physicians,
surgeons and public health experts of
the state.
The subjects to be discussed are to
be stripped of technical verbiage, and
wherever possible will be accompan-
ied by moving pictures and lantern
slides.
"For ages it has been deemed high-
ly unethical for members of the med-
ical profession to speak of their
work," said Dr. Kennedy, "but the
medical profession generally has come
to the conclusion that the public
should be told something of the work
of modern medicine. It believes that
the public has not been informed of
the tremendous strides made by this
science within the last 35 years. We
must carry the information to those
whom it will benefit most."
To Be Approved in January
The work of the joint committee
will be submitted to the board of coun-
cillors of the State Medical society and
to the Regents of the University in
January for their approval. The com-
mitte present at the deliberations
Tuesday will continue to function. As
a first step in the carrying out of the
new plans, charaqterized by President
Burton as being one of the most sig-
nificant steps ever attempted by the
University, a program committee.
composed of Drs. Cabot, Sundwall,
McLean, Kennedy and Professor Hen-
derson, was authorized to begin at
once the work of selecting speakers
and subjects.
Harbdr Club Plans Holiday Work
Steps to further the interests of the
University in their home city, and to
place before the present students of
the high school there the advantages
of the "greater Michigan" were taken
at the regular meeting of the Harbor
Springs club last Sunday afternoon in
Lane hall.
James A. Starr, '24L, was chosen
leader of a group to work actively in
the home community during the com-
ing vacation.

PHYSICAL IRICTORS TO
MEET IN BATTLE CREEK
DR. SUNDWALL, DR. GEORGE MAY,
MISS WOOD REPRESENT
UNIVERSITY
Dr. John Sundwal, director of stu-
dents' physical welfare, Dr. George A.
May, director of Waterman gymnas-
ium, and Miss Marion 0. Wood, direc-
tor of-physical education for women,
will represent the University at a
convention in Battle Creek from Dec.
20 to 22 under the direction of the
State Council of Physical Education.
Two hundred delegates, representin
instiutions in 13 states are expected
to attend the convention this year. Dr.
J.I,H Kellogg, owner of a sanitarium in
Battle Creek, will entertain the dele
gates as his guests. Floyd A. Rowe
'08, formerly connected with the ath-
letic office of the University, and at
present assistant superintendent of
public instruction for the state, is in
charge of arrangements for the con-
vention.
OR, BIRN5UW TELLS OF
COLONIES OE HOLLND
Holland is represented among the
nine powers gathered at the conference
at Washington due to her colonial pos-
sessions in the Far East, was the con-
clusion drawn by Dr. A. J. Barnouw,
Queen Wilhelmina professor of Dutch
literature and art in Columbia uni-
,ersity, in his talk, "Holland's Col-
onial Expansion," yesterday afternoon.
Dr. Barnouw pointed out how the
colonial expansion of Holland is in-
tricately bound up in the careers of
two companies. the Dutch East India
company and the West India company.
Through their efforts colonies were
-stablished and trade relations were
maintained which have given to Hol-
and her reputation in the world of
commerce and trade.
Dr. Barnouw showed that while
there have been some blots in Ho1-
'and's colonial policy the good that
has been accomplished has far off-
set this, and if the time should ever
come when the natives should at-
tain competence to manage their own
affairs, Holland will undoubtedly
grant them their freedom.
FORESTRY MOVIES
AT 7:30 TONIGH'
Moving pictures featuring the pro-
duction, value, and logging of white
pine will be shown at 7:30-o'clock to-
night at- the Natural Science auditor-
ium.
The films which will be used have
been obtained from the department of
agriculture, at Washington, through
the efforts of the forestry faculty of
the university.
Effects and results from blister rust,
illustrated in these films, will make
them of interest not only to foresters,
but to other departments in the Uni-
versity, it Is said. The public is in-
vited.
Education Seniors Elect Officers
Officers were elected yesterday at a
meeting held by the senior class of the
School of Education as follows: Pres-
ident, John S. Page; vice-president,
Inez E. Caswell; secretary, E. M. Al-

ber; treasurer, R. B. French. W. B.
Beadle was elected Student counpil
renresentat vm.

DEAN ADDESSES 1221;
COMMITTEES NAMED
DISCUSSES DUTY OF ENGINEER;
URGES MEN TO TAKE
RESPONSIBILITIES
Dean Mortimer E. Cooley, of the
enginering college discussed the re-
sponsibility of the engineering pro-
fession with regard to the relation be-
tween the public and public utilities
at the senior engineers' assembly yes-
terday morning, atawhich committee
appointments were announced.
In the past, said the dean, the en
neer considered his duty the inven-
tion and construction of utilities, such
as the railroad. After they were bul'
his responsibility was considered a'
an end. The ensuing complete misun-
derstanding between the utilities ar'
the public was in considerable meas-
ure the fault of the engineering pr
fession, he stated, because of the eng'
neers had not used their training in
assisting in the operation of these
utilities and keeping the public in-
formed of the real factors involved.
Dean Cooley urged the seniors to
take their responsibilities in thisrmat-
Aer seriously to heart.
G. W. McCordi, senior class presi-
dent, announced the appointment rof
the following committees:
Reception-H. S. Simpson, chair-
man; W. C. Naylor, R. S. Stuart, C. S.
Warner. Senior promenade- A. F.
Schirmer, chairman; D. T. Warner, G.
M. Chute, R.K. Braun, J. A. Riggs.
Banquet-T. H. Spain, chairman; G.
A. Larson, F. H. Coughlin, A. L. Welch,
W. W. Albright. Cap and gown-K.
M. Ronan, chairman; R. L. Neale, A.
W. Santelmann. Invitations-P. C.
Ackerman. chairman; A. D. Byers, F.
D. Johnston. Picture-C. S. Fink-
beiner, chairman; H. M. Shaw, G. -F.
Emery. Senior sing-H. D. Tubbs.
chairman. Souvenir-F. G. Hickey.
chairman; J. E. Sommers, E. J. Ker-
math.
ALUMNUS WORKERS MEET
Men Organize for Subscription Drive
During Christmas Vacation
Prospective campaigners for sub-
scriptions to the Michigan Alumnus.
official publication of the Alumni as-
sociation of the University, met at
7:30 o'clock Tuesday night at the
Union with Wilfred B. Shaw, '04, man-
aging editor of the Alumnus, for the
purpose of organizing and getting
pointers on how to solicit the alumni
of their respective territories during
the coming vacation.
The men planning to do this work
will receive compensation for every
subscription taken and every man se-
curing more than 50 signatures will
receive a bonus of $5, while the high-
est man, providing he procures more
than 50 subscriptions, will receive an
added bonus of $10.
"At the present time our circulation
is more than 7,500 copies per week. I
have -no doubt that the campaigners
will bring the total up to 9,000, the
necessary quota, but there is no rea-
son why the Michigan Alumnus should
not have a larger circulation than any
other college alumni magazine in the
United States. We have more alumni
by far than any other university or
college in the country and with the
Alumnus in its new form the news
contained in it is fresh and interest-
ing and the magazine can be of dis-
tinct service to every alumnus of

Michigan. The Alumnus should have
a circulation of 15,000 copies within a
a.r" a Ar . h...

RAILMEN WOULD
FIGHT TEN HOUR-
DAY WITH STRIKE
NEW YORK WORKERS WILLING TO
RISE AGAINST NEW
RULING
COUNCIL ADVISES MEN
TO WAIT FOR ORDERS
Grand Vice-President Roberts Says
Action Is Only Hope
for Labor
(By Associated Press)
New York, Dec. 14. - The action of
the United States railroad labor board
in Chicago yesterday in setting up a
schedule of 10 hours a day :s the reg-
ular hourly wage for common labor-
ers in new rules replacing the nation-
al agreement made under government
control today brought to union offi-
cials appeals for strike orders from
representatives of 30,000 workers in
the New York district.
Roberts Makes Announcement
This announcement was madegto-
night .by William D. Roberts, grand
vice-president of the united brother-
hood of maintenance of ways em-
ployes and railway shop laborers.
Roberts said that the New York
council had advised local chairmen to
hold their members at work and await
,action by international officers. He
explained these orders had been has-
tened out to forestall sporadic strikes
and that a meeting of the district
council would be held as soon as word
was received from the internationa
offices.
Only One Hope
Asserting that there seemed to be
no justice in America for the common
workman, Roberts in a formal state-
ment to union members continued:
"There is only one hope for these men
now that the prayers of capital have.
been answered. And that is action.
Labor is the sole property of the la-
borer and no power on earth can com-
pel them to utilize it unless it brings
a fair return."
Holiday Gargoyle
Pleases Camp us
With its atmosphere of Yuletide
maintained from the three color cov-
er to the ,department of "Foolish
Finds," its cleverly done parodies on
Christmas carols and St. Nicholas, and
its brilliance of campus wit, the Hol-
'day number of the Gargoyle found
favor with the students yesterday when
its first day's sales equalled, if not
surpassed, sales for November.
"A Visit from St. Barleycorn," is a
parody on "A Visit from St. Nicholas."
The narrator, hearing a clatter of
hoofs on the lawn, rushes to the win-
dow and is greeted by the sight of
"eight reindeers attached to a hogs
head of beer." The bucolic old saint
departs advising the narrator to "re
member St. Barleycorn when you are
tight."
"Ain't it the Weeds" is the impas-
sioned outburst of sonie homesick lad
who seems to be thoroughly disgusted
with the unrequiting labors of gain-
ing a college education.
"The Conquest of the Bull Pen" set
forth the intriguing adventures of Sir
Bastian Fathead, champion of verbos-

ity. "Heaven's Ward" is a didactic
epic treating with the successful flirt-
ation of a stranger with a Michigan
opera chorus girl. The stranger, how-
ever, is completely crushed later when-
he arrives at the stage door just in
time to see his chorus girl clad in male
attire rushing off to meet "her" best
girl.
GALENS CHOOSFS
TWELVE JUNIORS
Galens, honorary upperclass medi-
cal society, elected the following 12
junior medics to membership yester-
day: J. H. Labadie, S. E. Doolittle,
W. W. Babcock, J. W. Halfhill, W. W.
Duemling, M5. W. Fleischauer, H G.
Kleekamp, J. E. Croushore, R. R.
Schafter, D. R. Wright, R. F. Heat-;
ley, L. C. Ludlum.
Galens takes charge of numerous
..n- ^1o .n ~ ntinrniwe

Carols, Hymns on
Today 's Program
Many carols and Christmas hymns
of France, Germany and Italy will be
given in fantasy and offertory form at
the last twilight organ recital before
the holidays at 4:15 o'clock this after-
noon in Hill auditorium by Earl V.
Moore, University organist.
His complete program is as fol-
lows:
Offertory on Christmas Hymns...
.Guimant
Christmas Musette ...........Maily
Fantaisie sur deux Noels.....Bonnet
March of the Magi Kings......Dubois
Chorale: "In dulci Jubilo"......Bach
Fantasy on "Holy Night, Silent
Night" ............Gruber-Harker
Christmas in Sicily ............ .Yon
Hallelujah Chorus (Messiah).. Handel
OPERA TRIP SALS
BEAT OL 0RECORD
Reports of Box Offices Show Many
Houses Nearly Sold Out at
Present Time
DIRECTORS SAY SUCCESS DUE
TO COSTUMES AND DANCING
Unprecedented success on the road
trip of the 1922 opera, "Make It For
Two," is predicted by all advance in-
dications from theaters and alumni as-
sociations along the route. Seat sales
already reported from box offices ex-
ceed any records of previous years
and in several towns the houses that
will be played in are already nearly
sold out.
The costuming and dancing in this
year's opera are declared by the di-
rectors to be the chief cause of it
favorable reception last week by Ann;
Arbor audiences. The thousands of
dollars put into these adjuncts of the
production are considered to be well
invested by the Union management
since the professional atmoshere de
scribed by critics is attributed by them
to these features.
Committees have been appointed by
he Union to assist alumni associations+
In opera work but all students are1
urged to take pat in the general ad
ertising of the show. A number ot
towns are to be visited in which Mich-
gan productions have neve/ before
appeared and successful performance
'here can only be assured by co-oDera-
tion from all students who are at
home during vacation.
Players Present
Two Plays Well
Intelligent interpretation charac-
'erized both the plays presented by
Players club last night in Sarah Cas-
well Angell hall. In "Sham" with its
clever lines, by Frank G. Tompkins,
Jack Holden, '22, pleased the audi-
ence with his easy manner. Adele Zim-
merman, '22, as Clara, the wife; and
Nayf Bashara, '23L, as Charles, the
husband, exemplified the sham in the
socially aspiring American family.
David Gilchrist, '22, was the typical
reporter.
Wendell Hanselman, '23, as Strick-
land, in "The Finger of God" by Per-
cival Wilde, was especially good.
Esther Welty, '23, School of Music, as
the girl, and Milton Klee, '24, as Ben-
,on the valet acted their parts effec-

tively.
- Between the plays two solos were
given by Estelle Cozlne, Grad. An in-
formal reception followed the pro-
gram.
ff. MARCEL CLAVEL TELLS
OF FRENCH UNIVERSITIES
M. Marcel Clavel, of the romance
language department, discussed the
French student, his studies and man-
ner of living in a lecture given under"
the auspices of the Cercle Francais,
yesterday afternoon in Tappan hall.
M. Clavel told of the educational sys-
tem from the primary grades to the
universities, emphasizing the fact that
in the latter the student assumes the.
entire responsibility for doing satis-
factory work.
French universities do not foster
sports, although games are occasion-
ally held by the students, states M.

'M'SAWARDED0 TO
ATHLETES AT BIG
MEET LAST NIGHT
COACH AND TEAM MEMBERS MET
WITH ROUSING
CHEERS
MOVIES OF FOOTBALL
PLAYS GET OVATION
Professor Aigler Tells of Experiences
While Student; Mentions
Cross Country
Coach Fielding H. Yost and his war-
riors were rewarded with a rousing
ovation last night at Hill auditorium
when insignia were awarded to mem-
bers of the different athletic teams. C.
H. Darley, '22L, was chairman of the
meeting, while A. L. Cuthbert, '22E, in-
troduced the speakers. Thomas E.
Dewey gave a group of songs which
were followed by slides of the foot-
ball "M" men.
Motion pictures showing the best
ways to execute certain plays by
Coach Yost were followed by scenes
taken from the Ohio State game. The
pictures were made most realistic by
cheering of plays and the band play-
ing the "Victors"
Coach Fielding H. Yost was greeted
with wild enthusiasm. He paid high
tribute to the six men who have play-
ed their last game of football for
Michigan.
Prof. Ralph W. Aigler, chairman bf
the Board in Control of Athletics, told
of some of his experiences curing his
years as a Michigan student, empha-
sizing how cross country used to at-
tract from 100 to 200 runners each
year.
"Duke" Dunne, '24L, expressed his
feelings in a short snappy talk con-
cerning slackers and critics.
Captain-elect Paul Goebel, '23E, as-
sured the student body that the team
would do their best to put Michigan
at the top of the football world. J.
Fred Lawton, '11, composer of "Var-
sity", urged everyone to "fit into"
Michigan life and activities. He led
the crowd in singing Varsity and used
his famous "Mob scene from the Ju-
lius Caesar" and the "giant sneeze",
to rouse spirit.
A complete list of insignia awards
will be published tomorrow.
MUSICAL CONCERT
HAS YULE SPIRIT
(By M. Frances O'Hara)
Mellow candle light, Christmas trees
and a vested choir singing Christmas
carols imbued the audience at the
Matinee Musicale program yesterday
afternoon at the Union with the true

Yuletide spirit.
Anthony J. Whitmire and Mrs. Lor-
inda" S. Clifford charmed their listeners
with their duet, Grieg's Sonata No. 11,
Opus 13. This selection displayed Mr.
Whitmire's mastery of his instru-
ment,, his finely conceived tonal con-
trasts and that audacious brilliancy of
his style. In the adagio movement by
Ries the serious atmosphere of - the
number was lightened by the sweet-
ness of the melody, but the "Valse
Bluette" by Drigo-Auer captivated the
audience by its lilting and' severely
beautiful melody.
The Christmas carols were'beauti-
fully sung by the triple quartet. Es-
pecially liked were "Jesu, Thou Dear
Babe Divine," a Haytian cradle song,
and Zandonal's "Ave 0 Maria."
As accompanists, Mrs. Lorinda S.
Clifford and Mary Louise Maxwell dis-
played exceptional ability in matching
their work with that of the soloists.
GIFTS TO HOSPITALS
WILL BE COLLECTED I
, Oraginsations or individuals
wishing to make donations of
clothing, trees, or gifts to be
used at the hospitals are asked
to call Mrs. J. F. Breakey, 1504,
either tonight or'tomorrow morn- -
ing, in order that arrangements
may be made to collect the ar-
ticles.

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