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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

December 09, 1921 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-12-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

In

OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY
OF MICHIGAN.
Published every morning except Monday during te Vilnver-
sity year by the Beard in Control of Student Publications.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associaed Press is exci sivelentitled to the use for
republication of. all news dispatches credited to it "r not othrwie
credited in this paper and the local news published therein.
Entered at the posoffce at ALn Arbor, Michigan, as scod
class matter.
Subscription by carrier or mail, 3.5o.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press building, Maynard Street.
Phones: Business, 96o; Editorial 2414.
Communications not to exceed 30. words, if signed, the sig-
nature not necessarily to appear in print; but as an evidence of
faith, and notices of events wil be published in The Daily at the
discretion of the Editor, if left at or mailed to The Daily office.
Unsigned communications will receive no consideration. No man-
uscript will be returned unless the writer incloses postage.
The Daily does not necessarily endorse the sentiments ex-
pressed in the communications.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
MANAGING EDITOR..........BREWSTER P. CAMPBELL
Assistant Managing Editor................Hugh W. Hitchcock
City Editor................................E. P. Lovejoy, Jr.
Night Editors-
R. E. Adams C. P. Overton
Edward Ldambrecht M. B. Stahl
Hughston McBain Paul Watzel
Editorial Board Chairman.........................T. J. Whinery
Assistants-
S. T. Beach E. R. Meiss
L. A. Kern Leo Hershdorfer
Sunday Magazine E4ditor.............Thornton W. Sargent, Jr.
Exchange Editor................................George E. Sloan
Music Editor ...............................Sidney B. Coates
Sporting Editor.............................George Reindel
Women's Editor..........................lizabeth Vickery
Humor Editor .................................... E R. Meiss
Assistants
R. N. Byers L. Fenwick B. H. Lee
W.-B. Butler H.B. Grundy E . Mack
A. D. Clark Agnes 1Iclulnqist athrine Montgomery
Harry C. Clark H. E. Howlett R. C. Moriarity
P. Comstock Marion Kerr R B. Tarr
john P. Dawson L. S. Kerr Virginia Tryon
. A. Donahue M. A. Klaver Doroth hipple
W. F. Elliott Marion Koch L. B. Young
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 60
BUSINESS MANAGER.............VERNON F. HILLERY
Advertising .........................F. M. Heath, A. J. Parker
Publication............................ Nathan W. Robertson
Accounts ................................. John J. Hamels, Jr.
Circulation................................ Herold C. Hunt
Assistants
BurrC Robbins Richard Cutting H. Willis Heidbreder
W. Cooley James Prentiss W. Kenneth Gabraith
L Beaumont Parks Maurice Motle J. A. Dryer
Walter Scherer ,\iatin ( oldring Richard Heidemann
Edw. Murane Tyler Stevens T H Wolfe
David Park Paul Blum
FRIDAY, DECEMBER 9, 1921
Night Editor-THOMAS E. DEWEY
Assistant-Hughston McBain
Proofreaders-Millard H. Pryor
Victor W. Klein
FACULTY, PLEASE!
As the time of dismissal for Christmas recess
approaches, observing instructors may notice in ad-
dition to the customary "quizzed" look, upon the
countenances of their classes, an added quizzical
one. Closer investigation might disclose that many
of the students have their fingers crossed. In other
words, the burner of the midnight oil nowadays is
wondering and worried about something. He is
anxiously anticipating certain dread utterances
upon the part of his instructors, and secretly pray-
ing that they will never come forth.
Speculation is the painful cause of his behav-
iour, - speculation concerning the probability of
vacation assignments. The appearance of these
bugbears to an enjoyable Christmas fortnight have
of late been rather the exception than the rule.
From the faculty point of view it is often thought
necessary, perhaps, to make vacation assignments
in order to completely cover the required work of
a course. And yet, many instructors have discov-
ered through experience that such assignments are
futile, and that even the most conscientious students
do not perform them properly. What, then, can be
expected of the less conscientious ?
During a period of almost complete freedom,
leisure, and relaxation, it is well nigh impossible to
find time for work. This seeming paradox applies
to the Christmas recess. Ever since Thanksgiving
day the average student has been studying to re-en-
force his knowledge against a formidable bombard

ment of mid-semester bluebooks. In his mind, at
the present time, there dwells a suggestion which
he hesitates to express: "If only they would work
us harder next week, or when we return in Janu-
ary, and let our vacation go unhaunted by books!"
How about it, Mr. Instructor?
VOTING AND CLASS DUES
What promises to be a highly workable solution
of the class dues problem is found in the Student
council ruling that hereafter a clean financial slate
will be demanded as a qualification for voting in
class elections.
Each year treasurers in the past have spent
weeks of conscientious work in efforts to make the
class dues proposition what it ought to be - a
means for caring for necessary class expenses
through an even apportionment of the burden
among members. But each spring when the books
would be closed it would invariably be found that
in spite of urging and cajoling several people had
neglected to pay up.
This fall it was hoped that through a Class Dues
day the matter would be so impressed on the minds
of everybody that all outstanding accounts could be
collected at the beginning of the year and budgets
could be counted on. There is no doubt that this
innovation has accomplished a large part' of what
was expected of it and it may well be retained, but
judging from the reports of the treasurers a good
part of the dues remains unpaid. Probably many
of those who have not yet taken care of the mat.
ter will get around to it by spring, but as far as

completely disposing of the difficulty goes, Dues day
left the situation still unsatisfactory.
The council ruling will go a long way to com-
plete the remedy, however. In making payment of
dues a prerequisite for eligibility to vote a device
has been found which cannot help but call to each
undergraduate's attention his obligation to his class.
The means will- be especially forceful when some
of the more desirable campus offices are at stake,
and it should make the collection of dues almost,
self-acting.
When financial obligations to classes are laxly en-
forced there is a natural tendency on the part of
eevry one to hold off instead of settling his small
share, because of a feeling that there is no reason
why he should come across when others are 'not.
Consequently a heavier burden falls on those who
would settle any way and the classes are put inr the
precarious financial position they have enjoyed in
the past.
Any reasonable means of making collections
thorough, therefore, such as through the operation
of the new eligibility rule, is commendable Al-
though the by-law as published does not make it
clear whether it covers dues of previous years, to
make it most effective it should be so construed.
Because of the importance of some of the upper-
class offices nearly everyone will want to vote some-
time. Furthermore if the obligation is considered
as cumulative there will be little object in staving
off payment this year in hopes that it won't make
any difference the year following. And if practi-
cal difficulties do not interfere it would not be a
bad idea to make the requirement universal for
campus elections as well.

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THE MATINEE MUSICALE CLUB PRESENTS
Frederick Alexander, Conductor
AND THE
NORMAL COLLEGE CHOIR
(200 MIXED VOICES)
in a program of Christmas Music
ASSEMBLY HALL, MICHIGAN UNION, 4 P. M., SUNDAY, DECEMBER 11TH.
Tickets will not be sold at the door but are on sale this week at Graham's and Wahr's Bookstores and at
Tice's Drug Store. Single admission, $1.00. Members present membership cards.
The Matinee Musicale Club is indebted to Mr. Graham for the use of this space.

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DETROIT UNITED) LINES
AnnArbor and Jackson
TIME TABLE
(Eastern Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars-6.o5 a.
W.,7 .o5 a. m., 8:io a. m. and hourly to 9:1o
P. in.
Ja%:kson Express Cars (local stops of Ann
rbor), 9:48 a. m. and every two hours to
9~:48 p. in.
Local Cars East Bound-5 =55 a.m., 7:o, a.
Gn. and every two hours to 9:oo p. m., 1x :oo
,. M, To Ypsilanti only- :4o p. m., 12.25
<<. mn., rx:15a. an.
To Saline, change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars west Bound-7:50 a. M., 2:40 p.
in.
To Jackson and Kalamazoo-Limited cars
1:48, 10:4a a. m., 12:48, 2:48, 4:48.
To Jackson and Lansing-Limited: 8:4i
:,. mn.

TAXI
PHONE
DODGE CABS999

ENTER BASKETBALL
Almost before the "dopesters" have had their last
confab as to the ins and outs of 1921 gridiron de-
velopments, basketball takes the center of the stage
of sport. At Michigan after weeks of practice, it
makes its formal debut tonight in the opening game
between Coach Mather's court squad and Western
State Normal's strong quintet.
While the prospects for a successful. season here
are not bad, it is a certainty that a Conference court
championship is not going to fall into our hands
without any effort The prospects at other schools
are good, and plenty of stiff competition can be
counted on from them. Having lost three of last
year's stars, Michigan must fade the condition illus-
trated by the fact that Iowa has seven, Purdue five,
and Illinois four letter men back this year.
But a little opposition should only whet the appe-
tate Off for a bad start last year, our quintet
climbed, in some manner or other, from the bot-
tom of the Conference standing, to a tie for the top
rung. Let's help those five men get off with the
first for the season of 1921, and couple a flying start
with the spirit which made possible last winter's
showing.
The cycle of styles jn men's clothes seems about
halfway complete now that "bell-trou" have re-
placed the "peg-tops" of '05.
Even though his "war brides" have gone back on
him the ex-kaiser is rumored to be about to wed.

The Telescope
GIFTS
The wintry, icy wind bears tokens mute
That Xmas nears. Indeed 'tis time to think
Of gifts to give, whereby we firmly link
The friendships we most highly prize. Pan's flute
I give to Vee Dee he whose verses shoot
Like comet's brilliant flash o'er sky's dull brink.
To Erma and Ermine a health I drink;
There's joy enough in that for all. A lute
To him whose rhythmic melody enthralls
Us all. Me thinks that Helen Blazes' name
Lacks modesty. To her (or him, perchance)
A list of Grecian names is fit. . These halls
And all contribs of Telescopian fame
I give this bit of rhymed extravagance.
-- Zeke.
A Wonderful Chance for Somebody
Ad in the Detroit News says, WANTED:
CHORUS GIRLS, EXPERIENCED, GOOD-
LOOKING, MEDIUM-SIZED. Just a hint for
those who would like to find work over the Christ-
mas recess.
Songs of the Immortals
Our landlord needs
An educator,
Dumps ashes in
Th' insinuator.
Stories We Don't Believe
Once upon- a time there was a flapper who didn't
begin every other sentence with "And he said",
and answer every other question with "Aren't you
right ?" or "I'll tell the world !"
Aren't we right? I'll tell the world!
-H. F. C.
O Tempora! 0 Mores!
'22: Where've you been.
'25: Out for supper.
'22: D'y eat at Joe Parker's?
25: Nope. We were down at the Chamber of
Commerce.
Famous Closing Lines
"A man of few words," murmured the tourist
as he gazed at the statue. ERM.

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1921 DECEMBER 1921
S M T W T F S
1 2 8
4 5 6 7 8 9 10
11 12 18 14 15 16 17
18 19 20 21 22 23 24
25 26 27 28 29 30 31
NOTICE TO MEN
We do all kinds of high-class Hat
work at pre-war prices. Hots turned
nside out, with all new trimmings.
are as good as new.
FACTORY HAT STORE
617 PACKADll STREET
Telenbno 1792

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T H E
GREY
SHOP

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After the show
Where shall we .go
To the "Grey Shop"
For a "'3uffalo".
NUNNALLY'S SOUTHERN CANDIES
SPOEHR'S BULK CANDY

PROF. MILLER TELLS '24E
OF GERMAN LONG-RANGE GUN
Prof. H. W. Miller, of the mechan--"
ism and engineering drawing depart-
ment, spoke to the spohomore engi-
neer assembly yesterday, on the sub-
ject "The German Long-Range Gun,"
in which he gave an interesting treat-
ise on the powerful gun which the
Germans used to bombard Paris with
during the Great war. During the
bombardment the gun was situated
some 68 miles from Paris. Professor
Miller also explained in detail the
construction of the gun and the pro-
jectiles for it.
After Professor Miller's speech, it
was announced that the soph engineer
smoker would be held on Tuesday
evening, Dec. 13. Tickets for the
smoker which were on sale at the
meeting, will continue to be on sale
Friday and Monday over the engin-
eering arch.
Going home Christmas? So are we
ant we're getting our luggage at Wil-
kinson's, 325 So. Main St.-Adv.
Patronize our Advertisers.-Adv.

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600 E. Liberty

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ICE CREAM
IS JUST AS NOURISHING AND DELICIOUS
DURING THE WINTER MONTHS AS IT IS IN
SUMMER. IT KEEPS YOU IN GOOD HEALTH
THE YEAR 'ROUND

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Zwerdling's for Dependable Furs

F

URS

For Holiday Gifts, Both Beautiful and Useful
Fine furs, luxuriously soft and beautiful; snug and warm, giving style and comfort to
the wearer. Who will not value them as the very best Holiday gift investment? These
furs will be favored for every month of the year.
We have selected for Christmas giving a varied choice of fur neck pieces at the lowest
prices. They are in many sizes to suit the taste of the wearer; the small choker styles, the
scarf and cape effects - every one made of carefully selected skins and represent an amaz-
ingly good value at a little price.
FUR COATS
$80 to $350
Fur coats are always stylish and any woman would appreciate one for Christmas.
Right now, we are offering exceptional values.
REPAIRING AND REMODELING BY EXPERTS
ZWAERDLING'S
FUR AND TAILORING SHOP

m

ESTABLISHED 1904 ZWERDLING BLDGe
217 EAST LIBERTY STREET

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