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December 09, 1921 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-12-09

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* ASSOCIATED
THE WEATHER ASCAE
PRESS
UNSETTLED; NO CHANC E DAY AND NIHT WIRE
VOL XXXII. No. .64 ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 9, 1921 PRICE FIVE CEN'I

11 SCHOOLS GAIN
IN ANNUAL MANUAL
FIRST DAY'S PROGRAM PRESENTS
THREE PRINCIPAL
TALKS
FIRST ADDRESS ON
VOCATIONAL 'STUDIES
Speakers Discuss Teachers' Training
Problems and Correspondence
Instruction Methods
Representatives for 11 universities
and colleges of the Missisaippi valley
states met yesterday in the Union for
the 12th annual Manual Arts and In-
dustrial Education conference. Wil-
liam T. Bawden, assistant to the com-
missioner, United States Bureau of
Education, is chairman of the confer-
ence.
H. W. Schmidt, of the state depart-
ment of public instfuction, Madison,
Wis.,.gave the first address of the con-
ference at 10 o'clock yesterday morn-
ing on the "Influence of the Vocational
Motive in the Choice of Curricula by
High School Students." Mr. Schmidt
brought a report of his investigation
of some 15,000 students in 54 high
schools in Wisconsin showing to
to what extent the courses selected
had influenced them in their careers.
Vocational Work Ineffective
The report of Mr. Schmidt shows
that special courses such as home
economics or the trades do not have
any definite function in guiding stu-
dents into the 'related occupations.
His study showed an unexpectedly
small number, practically one-sixth,
of boys and girls undecided as to their
future.
Mr. Schmidt concluded by saying
that his investigation led him to be-
lieve that a further study is neces-
sary in order to determine just what
should be the real function of spec-
ial courses such as agriculture and
commercial courses in the education
of the high school boy and girl.
E. T. Filbey, acting director of the
vocational bureau of the Detroit pub-
lic schools led a discussion of the
subject discussed by Mr. Schmidt.
Burton Unable to Attend
Assistant Commissioner Ba wden
presided at the luncheon held'at 12:15
o'clock in the Union. Dean Allen
Whitney, of the School of Education,
spoke at the luncheon and reviewed
the work done here for manual arts
training. President Marion L. Bur-
ton was unable to attend the luncheon
because of the approaching meeting
of the Board of Regents.
C. F. Klenfelter of the federal board
of Vocation education, 'Washington,
D. C,, spoke at the afternoon session
on "Teacher Training Problems of
the Genera Industrial School," show-
ing the need for teachers sufficiently
versatile to teach many subpects. He
also brought out the fact that states
are encouraging the obtaining of men
with such versatility to organize
schools in the state offering general
courses in the industrial arts and re-
lated subjects. It is the idea of Mr.
Kleinfelter that industrial schools be
established much in the order of the
present high schools.
Lauds Correspondence Idea
At the evening conference James
McKinney of the American Correspon-
dence School, Chicago, spoke on "Sug-

gestions from Correspondence-instruc-
tion Methods,", advocating the adop-
tion of "the correspondence-instruction
methods by universities in their ex-
tension courses and stating that it
could be used very advantageously
by graduate students in connection
with their actual professions or voca-
tions.
ALL MOVIE SCENARIOS DUE
BEFORE TOMORROW NIGHT
Scenarios for the University
movie must be turned in to the
secenarlo editor of The Daily
before S o'clock tomorrow night,
t":v hour when the contest closes.
Any received after that time can-
not be accepted, as the judges
must start work immediately on
grading -the plots. A decision
will be announced as soon as
possible.

1

Opera Personnel Disptays Ease And
Stage Presence In Third Night Sholv

(By Edwi&R,Meiss)
An ease and stage presence which
permitted the full and unhampered
display of a production elaborate in
scenery, racy in lines, exquisite in
costume, and professional in the qual-
ity of its dance numbers, were evinc-
ed last night by the cast and chorus
of the sixteenth Michigan Union opera,
"Make It for Two", in its third per-
formance at the Whitney theater.
An interweaving of dance and scen-
ic numbers with the persisting thread
of the plot completed the evolution
from straight musical comedy to the
more splendid musical revue, through
which the Mimes' productions have
been passing during the past few
years.
That which contributes possibly
more than any other factor to the
success of this year's opera is the

perfection and originality of its solo,
duet, and chorus dance sketches.
These show a skill and training unsur-
passed in professional performances.
Earl C. Powers, '22, and George Z.
Hoffman, '24, held the audience amaz-
ed with the effectiveness of their spe-
cial duet number in the second act.
A well-chosen cast was headed by
Arthur H. Holden, '24, opposite whom
played Howard A. Donahue as the in-
genue daughter of Wilfrid R. Laurie,
'22L, and William R. Sutherland, '22,
playing the roles of Mr. and Mrs.
Haughton in a manner which reminds
one of "Bringing up Father".
A real character sketch was that of
the poet, as portrayed by James Dres-
bach, '24, while had Shakespeare seen
the robust figure of Albert F. Schir-
mer, '22E, in the part of the vamp, he
might never have said, "Frailty, thy
name is woman."

HUMMER ELECTED VARIETY KEYNOTE
1-HOP CH9iRMAN OF XMAS CHIMES

Coolidge Kres,Robert Martin, Robert
Gibson Compose Balance of
Committee
EXCLUSIVE JUNIOR AFFAIR
IS PREFERENCE OF CLASS
Charles Hummer was -elected chair-
man of the J-Hop committee at a meet-
ing of the junior lit class held yester-
day afternoon in Natural Science audi-
torium Coolidge Kreis and Robertt
Martin were chosen as committeemen
to fill the vacancies left by the with-
drawal of James Hume, and the elec-
tion of Hummer to the chairmanship.
The committee now consists ofI
Charles Hummer, chairman, Coolidge
Kreis, Robert Martin and Robert Gib-
son.
The class also went on record as
being in favor of making the J-Hop
as exclusively a Junior affair as pos-
sible, by giving juniors preference in
the distribution of tickets.
FACULTY MEN To ATTEND
PROFESSORS CONENTION
Six Michigan faculty men will rep-
resent the local chapter of the Amer-
ican Association of University Profes-
sors at the national convention of the
organization, which will be held Dec.
29 and 30 at Pittsburg.
The following members of the Mich-
igan chapter will go as delegates to
the convention: Prof. Jesse S.
Reves, Prof. R. T. Crane, Prof. J. R.
Hayden, and John E. Kirkpatrick, of
the political science department,
Prof. I. Leo Sharfman, of the econom-
ics department, and Prof. Charles H.
Cooley, of the sociology department.
Prof. E. C. Case, of the geolgy de-
partment, is president of the local
chapter.
DEAN A. S. WHITNEY LEAVES TO
ATTEND TEACHERS' MEETING
Dean A. S. Whitney leaves today for
Lansing, where he will preside as
chairman over the first meeting of the
executive board of the Michigan State
Teachers' assocatoin, of which he is
president. At this meeting policies for
the year will be discussed, including
larger plans of legislation which in
its completion will affect both the
teaching body, the state school organ-
ization and students.
It is expected at this meeting to ar-
range for the installation into the as-
sociation of a permanent secretary,
who will edit the quarterly teachers'
magazine organized at the recent an-
nual conference. The secretary would
also take charge of other work in con-
nection with the association, includ-
ing the making out of six programs
for the various sectional teachers'
conferences to be carried on this year
throughout the state.

"College Thoughts After 80 Years"
Contributed by "Ousted
Student"
PRIZE WINNING SHORT STORY 1
APPEARS IN CURRENT IS'EY
A pro and con discussion of Mich-7
igan's democracy, and, the story of an
"ousted alumnus" who made good, form
the features which arouse the greatest
interest among the various types of
articles in the December issue of
Chimes which appeared on the cam-.
pus yesterday.
Of course, the tale of anyone whom
the University authorities had at one {
time unredeemably consigned to etern-
al and everlasting Tantalus is relished
potently by the student body, especi-
ally if the consigned has since achiev-
ed success in the wide world and re-
turns in words to chuckle at his con-
signees. This Mr. Fred C. Kellly, at'
present a noted journalist, proceeds
to do in his clever contribution to
Chimes, entitled "College Thoughts
After Twenty Years."
Chimes' return this month to its
originally stated function, "the ex-
pression of student opinion," with its
"Yes" and "No" answers to the timely
question, "Is Michigan Democratic?"
Unfortunately the two writers, Leo
1. Hershdorfer, '23, on the affirmative
and Maynard Newton, '22, on the nega-
tive, take different points of view, one
arguing the democracy of Michigan
from the objective standpoint of her
institutions and activities, the other
choosing the subjective point of view
to prove that individual students are
(Continued on Page Ten)
Lawton to Head Underwriters' Board

EX4GOY. WHITM
SPEAKSTONIGHT
Lecture Incorrectly Announced in The
Daily for Last
Night
"ADMIA(ISTRATION OF CRIMINAL
JUSTICE", TOPIC OF ADDRESS
Charles S. Whitman, former govern-
or of New York and recognized au-
thority on the subject of criminal jus-
tice, will deliver an address tonight in
Hill auditorium. It was incorrectly
stated in yesterday's issue of The
Daily that he was scheduled to speak
last night.
Mr. Whitman has chosen for his
topic tonight "The Adminstration of
Criminal Justice", a subject in which
he has been actively interested for
many' years, due to the various offices
which he has held in New York.
During his term as district attorney
in New York county, he succeeded in
breaking up and convicting the fam-
ous gang of law breakers of which
Police Lieutenant Becker was the
head.
While serving in an executive po-
sition in New York city, Mr. Whitman
was also responsible for the institu-
tion of special night courts, an insti-
tution which has spread over the
country to most of the principal ci-
ties.
Mr. Whitman is being entertained by
Prof. Jesse S. Reeves, of the political
science department, and will be the
guest of honor at a luncheon which
is being given this noon at the Union
by Professor Reeves.
Professor Reeves will introduce
Mr. Whitman at the lecture tonight.
Popular Numbers
In Organ Recita
(By Sidney B Coates)
Borowski's Sonata, No. 1 in A minor
was the opening number at the twi-
light organ recital yesterday after-
noon in Hill auditorium by Earl V.
Moore, University organist. The work
showed Mr. Moore at his best, being
played with a thorough understand-
ing of the work and of its possibilities
on the auditorium organ.
Then followed three numbers popu-
lar for their much loved melodies.
These numbers were Massenet's "Ele-
egy", Dvorak's "Humoreske" and Le-
mare's "Chant de Bonheur", and they
showed, by the appreciation which
they brought, the American tendency,
as far as music is concerned, to pre-
fer the old, the tried, the beautiful t
the new. and machine carved. The
first two of these numbers, however
written primarily for the piano, lose
slightly when adapated to the organ
Mr. Moore finished with Bach's Toc-

PROF. HENDERSON
TO SPEAK SUNDAY
AT XMAS SERVICES
Prof. William D. Henderson, of the
University Extension division, will
give a short address at the University
Christmas service at 7 o'clock Sunday
night in Hill auditorium.
The rest of the service will be
devoted to the musical program of
special Christmas significance arrang-
ed by the School of Music. The mus-
ical program will be announced later.
OPERA TO SHOW
SATURDAY NIGHT
Increased Number Ticket Applications
Makes Additional Performance
Necessary
CITIES ON ROUTE OF TRIP
REPORT HEAVY SALES
"Make It For Two", the 1922 Union
opera, will appear for an additional
performance at the Whitney theater
Saturday night, following a decision
of the directors of the production yes-
terday. Applications for tickets have
been turned in at the Whitney thea-
ter steadily for the past few days,
and, with practically all seats sold
out for the remaining three shows,
Union officials decided that applicants
could only be accommodated by the
addition of another performance.
Tickets for the Saturday night show
will go on sale at the Whitney theate.
at 10 o'clock this morning.
Advance sales ' in cities on the
route of the opera point to the most

PACIFIC PACT IS
SUBSTITUTE FOR
JAPAN ALLIANCE
PRELIMINARY DRAFT OF FOUR
POWER AGREEMENT HAS
FOUR CLAUSES
9 NATIONS PLEDGE NOT
TO INFRINGE ON CHINA
Question of Limitation of Fortiilca-
tions and Naval Bases Brought
Up For First ime

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(By Associated Press)
Washington, Dec. 8.-The prelimin-
ary draft of the proposed four power
Pacific agreement is understood to in-
clude four clauses, the first of which
declares that the agreement shall
serve as a substitute for the Anglo-
Japanese alliance.
The draft further provides, it is un-
derstood, for discussion or conferences
in case any matter of disputatious na-
ture arise, thus incorporating Presi-
dent Harding's idea for a later series
of international conferences.
Conference Pushes Ahead
While they wait for definite reply
on the naval ratio plan on the four
power agreement, the arms confer-
ences are pushing ahead with other
features of their negotiations.
Today's developments brought into
prominence for the first time the ques-
tion of a limitation of fortifications
and naval bases on the Pacific islands,
and although the subject was not ad-
vanced to the stage of formal ex-
changes, an agreement was forecast
preserving in general the existing
status.
Nations Make Pledge
Again applying the American "four
points" to the Chinese problem, the
nine nations represented in the far
eastern committee, pledged themselves
to make no treaties or agreements in
the future infringing on China's terri-
torial or administrative integrity or
interfering with her right to economic
and national development.
In the Shantung negotiations the
progress was less pronounced but the
Japan and Chinese delegations held
another convocation of the subject of
public properties and afterwards both
also renewed their predictions of a
satisfactory settlement.

successful trip ever had by
gan production. The first

a Michi-
night at

J. Fred Lawton, '11, was elected cata and Fugue in D minor, a classi-
president of the Detroit Board of LP cal number of a difficulty-more -* pre-
Underwriters at a recent meeting (L ciated due to the 'contrast of the
that organization. While a student works which immediately preceded it
here Lawton was active in campus af- and a type of number without which
fairs. no organ program seems complete.

Chicago is already practically sold
out and all seats for the single per-
formance in Toledo have been dis-
posed of, it is reported.
The committee of Flint students that
will assist alumni in that city with
advertising and preliminary work is
composed of David Martin, '25, chair-
man; James Rice, '24, Donald John-
son, '25; Robert P. Brown, '23, and
John Pontius, '24. This committee is
similar to 12 other organizations ap-
pointed by the Union this week to as-
sist in opera work during Christmas
vacation.
WOME N HOLD BUiLDING
Raising money for a women's build-
ing is the purpose of the bazaar which
will open at 1 o'clock this afternoon
in Barbour gymnasium. Every woman
in the University has contributed to
this bazaar and there will be on sale
2,000 articles including collar and cuff
sets, painted book-ends, candle sticks,
tiny pine trees, and everything appro-
priate for Christmas gifts. At the
candy booth there will be more than
800 pounds of home made candy which
will be sold in the bulk or boxed for
75 cents a pound.
The tea room will be open to serve
lunch at 11:30 o'clock and will be open
during bazaar hours except the din-
ner hour, during which a church
supper will be served both nights.
Masques will present "Why the
Chimes Rang" as an added attraction
at 8 o'clock tonight, for which they
have deciaed to charge 10 cents admis-
sion. Mummers will give several skits
at 2:30 o'clock tomorrow afternoon.
TO AWARD "M'S"
NEXT WEDNESDAY
Following an old custom in force be-
fore the war, a gigantic mass meeting,
will be held next Wednesday night in
Hill auditorium. The awarding of
football honors will be the main fea-
ture of the evening but a wide va-
riety of entertainment is being plan-
ned for the occasion.
Presentation of "M's", "AMA's", and
"R's" to those members of the foot-
ball squad and reserves who have won
them during the past season, will be
followed by a short snappy talk by
Fred Lawton, '11, of Detroit, who wil
also lead in the singing So far the
plans are in an incomplete condition
but among the 'means of entertain
ment which will be provided are in
cluded a movie and selections by th
band.

f

-i

A PLEA FOR CHARITY
Only one hundred and fifty dollars were needed to give the
crippled hospital children and the poor city youngsters a Christ-
mas party. Most of it is still needed, for the campus, so far,
has failed to respond to the appeal of the Student Christian
association for funds. Whether the deluge of drives has at last
pushed the college public beyond the limits of its patience, or
whether the campus is just plain disinterested is a matter for
conjecture.

,-I

PrF.SUNOWALLSPEAKS
BEFORE DETROIT ALUMNI
TELLS OF PLANS FOR TEACHING
PERSONAL SANITATION
TO STUDENTS
(Special to The Daily)
Detroit, Dec. 8.-Prof. John Sund-
wall, director of student physical.
welfare, was the faculty speaker at
the regular weekly luncheon of the
Detroit Alumni association at the
Board of Commerce here today.
His talk dwelt mostly with the work
of the University in relation to the
general health of the student body, de-
claring that every student receives a
thorough physical and medical exam-
ination to determine his fitness, so
that those who are found to be unfit
are given special care and attention
to better equip them to take up their
academic work
"It is our intention," said Dr. Sund-
wall, "to teach personal sanitation to
every student. At present we are
working toward this end by endeavor-
ing to have the 99 per cent of the stu-
dent body who are not in Varsity
sports engaged in some branch of ath-
letics."
EDUCATION JUNIORS FORM
TEMPORARY ORGANIZATION
Herold C. Hunt was -elected tem-
porary chairman of the junior clasi
of the School of Education yesterday
at its meeting in Tappan hall. Rosi
Barton was elected temporary secre
tary.
v A committee composed of the tem
l porary chairman, temporary secre
e tary, Adele Unger, Clarence Duncan
a and Josephine Russell was chosen tV
- nominate the officers of the class.. Th
- election will take place at 4:30 o'clocl
e Jan. 5,' the place to be announce
later.

It would be strange if the students are disinterested. One
of the virtues of the college person is supposed to be his interest
in other people in spite of his partial isolation from outside
affairs. It would not be strange if he were weary because of
the overpowering number of money drives, but it would cer-
tainly be pitiful if there isn't a dime or a quarter or a half dol-
lar left in the wallet for the support of a good cause.
To use the usual sentimental phrases is hardly necessary.
Everyone should already be well-acquainted with the rather sad
plight of these unfortunate children. Everyone knows how much
Santa Claus and Christmas meant to him when he was little,
and how he felt when he saw the Christmas tree. Everyone
knows what Christmas, without anything which usually comes
with Christmas, will mean for these youngsters.
These things do not need repetition. Nor does the campus
need to be told that it has a duty to perform even if it is disin-
terested. The campus knows all that. The only question is
whether there is a lack of real Christmas spirit. There is an
excellent chance to show that you actually have it - or that you
are beyond redemption. If you have, you'll fill those voting boxes
which will be on the campus to overflowing today, so that twice
two hundred and fifty poor kids can have a Christmas party.

Wisconsin Dean Visits Prof. Phillips
George C. Sellery, dean of the col-
lege of letters and science of the Uni-
versity of Wisconsin, was in the city
Wednesday as guest of Prof. U. B.
Phillips, of the history department.

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