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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

December 08, 1921 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-12-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY
OF MICHIGAN
Published every morning except Monday during the Univer-
sity year by the Beard in Control of Student Publications.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED P5tESS
The Associated Press is exclusivelytentitled to the use fir
republication of all news dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
credited in this paper and the local news published therein.

Entered at the postoflice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
as matter.
Subscription by carrier or mail, 13.50.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press 'building,.Maynard Street.
Phones: Business. 960; Editorial, 2414.

Communications not to exceed 300 words, if signed, the sig-
nature not necessarily to appear in print, but as an evidence of
faith, and notices of events will be published in The Daily at the
discretion of the Editor, if left at or kmailed to The Daily office.
Unsigned communications will rece ve no consideration. No man-
uscript will be returned unless the writer incloses postage.
The Daily does not necessarily endorset the sentiments ex-
pressed in the communications.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
MANAGING EDITOR .......... BREWSTER P. CAMPBELL
Assistant Managing Editor................Hugh W. Hitchcock
City Editor.............................E. P. LovejoyJr.
Night Editors-
R. 4. Adams - G. P. Overton
Edward Lambrecht M. B. Stahl
Hughston McBain Paul Watzel
Editorial Board Chairman.....................T. J. Whinery
kssistants-
S. T. Beach E. R. Messs
L. A. Kern~ Lea Hershdorfer
Sunday Magazine Editor................Thornton W. Sargent. Jr.
Exchange Editor............................George E. Sloan
Music Editor .............................Sidney B. Coates
Sporting Editor .............................. George Reindel
Women's Editor...........................Elizabeth Vickery
Humor Editor................................ E R. Meiss
Assistants
R. N. Byers L. L. Fenwick B. H. Lee
W. B. Butler H. B. Grundy E. Mack
A. D. Clark Agnes II olinquist atbrine Montgomery
Harry C. Clark H. E. Howlett R. C. Moriarity
J.P. Comstock Marion Kerr R. B. Tarr
SP. Dawson L. S. Kerr Virginia Tryon
A. Donahue M. A. Klaver Doroth Whipple
W. F. Elliott Marion Koch L. L. Post

r

J. B. Young

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
BUSINESS MANAGER ............. VERNON F. HILLERY
Advertising ......................F. M. Heath, A. J. Parker
Publication............................Nathan W. Robertson
Accounts.............................John J. Hamels. Jr.
Circulation .........................Herold---Hunt
Assistants
Burr L. Robbins Richard Cutting H. Willis Heidbredr
W. Cooley James Prentiss W. Kenneth Galbraith
,. Beaumont Parks Maurice P oule 3.iA Dryer
Walter Scherer matin Goldring Richard Heidemann
Edw. Murane Tyler Stevens T. H Wolfe
David Park Paul Blum
THURSDAY, DECEMBER 8, 1921
Night Editor-JOHN P. DAWSON
Assistant-Martin A. Kiaver
Proofreaders-J. S. Pontius
R. N. Byers
There will be a meeting of the entire Upper staff
of The Daily at 4:30 o'clock this afternoon.
GIVE THEM A CHRISTMAS
Time is rapidly bringing Christmas 'round, and
we are beginning to feel the old spirit again. There
are plans to be made for the usual holiday festivi-
ties, including parties, and dinners, and balls; there
are =gifts to be bought and cards to be sent; there
are thousands of things to be thought of, and other
people to be considered.
Christmas should do just this - make us think
about other people, and forget ourselves. And the
annual call to give the children of the hospitals and
the poor children of the city a real, honest-to-good-
ness Christmas should meet a responsive chord in
us somewhere. Connect your own remembrances
of the Christmases you used to have when you were
youngsters with the poor children and the sick ones
in the hospitals, and join in with the S. C. A. in
ne aking them happy.
There is to be a ,Christmas pa.rty for these chil-
dren, with funny skits, and ice cream, and every-
thing. There are to be toys and good things to
eat for everyone and warm clothes for those that
need them. Actually this sort of charity is going to
be human - warm and cheerful and full of fun,
not cold and impersonal like much philanthropy is.
It's up to you whether they are to have it or not.
They need it,
THE HOTEL SHORTAGE
Ann- Arbor is probably more peculiarly situated
than most cities in that she is forever being flooded,
for only a day or so at a time, with visitors by the
thousands. Football games, the May Festival, Com-
mencement and similar occasions bring alumni and
friends and relatives of students back to the- town
in droves.
Ann Arbor is unfortunately lacking in means of
providing for the visits of these visitors, however.
The Michigan Union cares for a small number. Fra-
ternity houses care for still more perhaps. But the
rest must find accommodations where they can, and
generally the supply of rooms available is anything
but adequate. Many are taken care of by regular
landladies or by private families; but the local ho-
tels offer little or no means of housing the visiting
throngs.
Someday, something will have to be done here in
preparation for the periodical inpouring of Michi-
gan's thousands from outside. As our stadium is
gradually increased in size, as our May Festival
continues to grow in popularity, and as the number
of students goes constantly upward, the numbers
attendant upon the big features of Michigan's school
year are going to present an ever-growing problem
to the city. Moreover, if the rate of municipal
growth does not rise in proportion to that of the
University. more and more of the city's rooms con-
stantly will be demanded by the students themselves,
and a continually smaller number will be available
each year for the accommodation of outsiders.
Ann Arbor needs hotels, and she needs them

badly. It ought to be worth the while of any pri-
vate individual to purchase sufficient building space
and to erect an additional hotel in this town. Not
only do we have thousands ever coming to the Uni-
versity for a few days at a time, but a great num-
ber also are continually passing through the city,
going in all directions. Ann Arbor is well located
for business purposes - and Detroit is particularly
deficient in the hotel line just at present.
If no private individuals see fit to attempt the es-
tablishment here of one or more hotels, it is not
inconceivable that the University might begin and
conduct the scheme on a paying basis. The Union
is one step. But we certainly need more rooms by
far-than the Union can furnish and certain other
colleges have made the scheme pay.
If we let things go on as they are what are we
going to do with our guests ten years from now?
BUY THAT TICKET
"Come early and avoid the rush" is the call sent
out by the local railroad officials to those who will
be leaving Ann Arbor for the Christmas holidays.
The President has received a communication from
the agent of the Michigan Central Railroad asking
that publicity be given this matter, and in order to
relieve congestion at the ticket office and baggage
room and enable the railroad to give better service
to students, everyone should endeavor to buy his
ticket early and attend to his baggage as soon as
possible. There is always an unusually large num-
ber leaving at vacation time and if every one helps
to relieve the holiday rush there should be no trou-
ble whatever when the last day comes around in
getting satisfactory service from the carriers. Buy
that ticket and get you resevation now.
COMPETITION IN JOURNALISM
The function of a newspaper is to serve the pub-
lic with all the news that is fit to print. It is often
difficult, however, for any certain newspaper to
convince the people that it is the best fitted to serve
the public. So it is that at present we find the Amer-
ican press engaged in a lively battle for supremacy,
with competition as the driving force. Some pa-
pers, in their efforts to gain the subscriptions of
the public, have resorted to schemes to gain this
end, these schemes being camouflaged as literary
contests or something similar, the real aim being to
increase circulation through lotteries or some other
device for giving away cash prizes.
Postmaster Hays has seen through all this, how-
ever, and after considering the matter from the
standpoint of the reader and the publisher, decided
that these devices were merely being used to dupe
the unsuspecting public to build up circulation. Mr.
Hays' action of last week in ordering all newspa-
pers conducting such contests to immediately dis-
continue them seems to have brought results. All
the papers to whom he has sent these directions have
replied that they would comply, so that now any
newspaper which persists in holding these lotteries
will do so only at the risk of incurring the dis-
pleasure of the post office department, and probably
suspension from mail service privileges.
Lotteries are unlawful and demoralizing. What
more beneficial act could have been committed for
the betterment of the press, and for all journalistic
interests in general, than Postmaster Hays' order
for the elimination of these undesirable, no-con-
structive devices?
Today is your chance to give Ann Arbor chil-
dren a Merry Christmas while you are enjoying
your own.
1 The Telescope
How Dear to My Heart!
How dear to my heart is the co-ed behind me,
Who holds forth with many a giggle and gasp,
On fashions, and scandals; and recent engagements,
In voice of sweet shrillness which yet tends to rasp !

DETROIT UNITED LINES
Ann Arbor and Jackson
TLMF ~iTABLE
(Eastern Standard Time)
Detroit Limited ard Express Cars-6.o a
7:o5 a. in., 8:io a. m. and hourly to 9:1
Jackson Express Cara (local stops of Ann
rbor), 9:48 a. m. and every two hours to
j:48 p. m.
Local Cars East Bound-5:5 a.m., 7:00 a
. and every two hours to 9:oo p. m.', i .
1n. To Ypsilanti only-t :o P. i., 12.25
To Saline, change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars West Bound-7:50 a. mn., 2:40 p
To Jackson and Kalamazoo-Limited cars
g:48, 10:48' a. n., t::48, 2:48, 4:48.
To Jackson and Lanaing-Limited: :
mn.
1921 DECEMBER 1921
S M T WV T F s
1 2 3
4 5 6 7 8 9 10
11 12 13 14 15 16 17
18 19 20 21 22 23 24
25 26 27 28 29 30 31
NOTICE TO MEN
We do all kinds of high-class ha
work at pre-war prices. Hats turned
aside ot. with all new trimmings.
4.re a good as new.
FACTORY HAT STORE
617 PAC'KARD STREET
Tplphone 17912
Buy your class toques from Daily
advertisers.-Adv.
ADRIAR-ANN ARBORCBUS
SCHEDULE EFFECTIVE OCT. 10, 191
Read Dnwn Central qtanard Time
A P.M P.M A&P -
Daliy Daily Daily Dail
7:30 1:3o Lv... Adrian ...Ar. 7:00 1.4:
,8:05 2:05 ... Tecumseh. 6:5 12:4
8:25 2:25 .......Clinton..... 6:5 1x:
9:15 3:t5......Saline....515 11:t
9:45 3:45 Ar. Ann Arbr L.'445 10:3.
AM. PMPMA&P"
Mead Ui.
SITNT)AYS AND HOLDAY
P.M P.M.
3:30 Lv... Adrian ..Ar. 9:00
4:05 .... Tecumseh ... 8:5
4:25 ....Clinton .. 8:
5:15 .. Saline .... 7:us
5:45 Ar. Ann Arbor Lv. 6:45
P.M.
For
Christmas
A Box
or Basket of
Candy
We Pack
We Mail
Come In

Today
709 N. UNIVERSITY AYE.

THE

"Y " INN

MUSIC WITH YOUR MEALS
The '"Y" Inn has engaged the services of Elmer
Hess, Violinist, and Phil Diamond, Pianist, with
a five-piece Orchestra to furnish music during the
dinner rush-5:30 - 6:30
OPEN TO MEN AND WOMEN
A Place to bring your friends
Nowhere is the food better
Nowhere is the service more prompt
TUTTLE'S LUNCH ROOM
Maynard Street
- a
Getlen from 0 & H MEN'S-et'emo&
= ~~SHOE SHOP .
a s
Big Reduction on Footwear
i AT THE
r SALE STARTS SALE ENDS
DEC.7-8A.M. HDOP EC.17, 10P.X
s w
A SALE THAT WILL PAY EVERY MAN TO ATTEND
OXFORDS NIGH SHOES WORK SHOES
Cordovan $9.85 Cordovan $9.85 Army Shoes $4,8$
Norwegian $8.85 Heavy Welt
s orwegan $7.85 Codan $.5 AmShe 48
r$ Norwegian $9.85 Shoes $4.35
Norwegian $885 Calfskin $6.85 Ilksiins $2.85
Vici Kid 6.85 Heavy Arctics $3.85
.Dress Oxfords $7.85
Cushion Sole $6.55 Moccasins,
Sheepskins $2.35 1 Special Lot $3.85 $1.85 to $3.35
O'KANE & HERTLER
SHOP EARLY BEST STYLE SELL FIRST
-Il~ li~ llpl Il5ll~ln lillll[I l~ll1$Ii illll~ llllll lll

z

Narcissus Bulbs with Bowls at
GRAHAM'S
Both Ends of the Diagonal Walk

I

I

-1

,Vr

That
That
That
Who

dear ,gentle co-ed!
God-forsook co-ed !
nerve-racking co-ed
talks in Ec class!
- Heza Prince.

Observations
It has come to our attention through want ads
that a surprising number of fraternity pins have
been lost lately. Thought that usually occurred
during Christmas vacation. - Uno Wye.

'25:
into a

Beware These Movie Days
Pass through each door,
With noble stride,
The camera man
May be outside. - Pi-rex.
A Vivid Description
Yeh, you know Bill's neck? Well, he fell
pond up to it.
Quite a Change "
'Mid the many shifts and changes
Of the campus and the Frosh,
Is the one we lately notice --
They have buttoned the galosh,
- Teddy Bear.

$1.60
. Ip

appso-
nyone
sen-
S for
e-pre.
ots are
tgutar,
- "The -Quarry
P. Claue Drake
Propietow
1(

cat~z
p.7

Other Icy-Hots from
. 51.50 to $10.00

Our Latest Soiq Entitled:
"It's a grate life," by the Nutmeg.
-Kanukk Harry.
Famous Closing Lines
"Isn't that just like him." inquired the photog-
rapher as he held up the picture. ERM.

ti

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Keeps Contents Cold for3 Days: IHot fr Iours

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