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December 07, 1921 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-12-07

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THE WEATHER

PROBABLY SNOW
TODAY

AbF
ro
Iii t

:4Iui1il

ASSOCATI
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT
SERVICE

VOL. XXXII. No. 62

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 7, 1921

PRICE FIV

I

ACE OLD QUARRHEL
BETWEEN ENGLISH
AND IRISH ENDED0
ARTICLES OF. TRUCE SIGNED
EARLY TUESDAY MORNING
BY MINISTERS
IRELAND GIVEN STATUS
OF CANADA, AUSTRALIA
Treaty Expected to Be Approved by
Imperial Parliament But Ulster
Stand "Uncertain
(By AssociatedPress)
London, Dec. 6. -The century old
quarrel between England and Ireland
was ended as has been fervently hoped
in the small hours of Tuesday morn-
ing by the signature, in the prime
minister's cabinet room, of a treaty
between Great Britain and Ireland
consisting of 18 articles giving >Ireland
the title of the Irish Free State and
giving Ireland the same status as
Canada, Australia and other overseas
dominons.
Faithful to King
The question of allegiance which, up
to the last moment threatened to
wreck the negotiations was sur-
mounted by permitting the members
of the Irish parliament to swear al-
legiance to the constitution of the
Irish Free State and "be faithful to
his majesty, the king."V
The treaty has yet to run the gaunt-
let of the Ulster government and of
the Imperial parliament which has
been summoned to meet on Dec. 14
and will be opened in state by the
king, who has taken the closest per-
sonal interest in the Irish negotia-
tions, since he practically instigated
them when he opened the Ulster par-
liament.
Ulster Not Certain
Approval by the Imperial parliament
is a. foregone conclusion, as the gov-
ernment has an overwhelming major-
ity in the house of commons favoring
its Irish policy.
The position of Ulster is less cer-
tain. Evidence comes from Belfast
tonight that the treaty will be sub-
jected to the most searching examina-
tion before receiving assent, and
doubtless many modifications will be
proposed.
BASKETBALL.*TICKETS.
SELL WELL FIRST DAY

PAY FOR 'ENSIAN SPACE
Due-to a ruling of the Board in
Control of Student Publications
it is necessary that all campus
organizations who want space
reserved in the 1922 Michiganen-
sian, shall pay for the space by
Dec. 10. The price per full page
is $25 which includes the cost
of the group picture. The price
for a half page is $15, but no
pictures will be placed on this
amount of space. '
It has been necessary to raise
price per page over last year be-
cause of-the increase in the cost
of the engraving and printing,
and the increase in the- size of
the book. The actual cost to pub-
lish each page is $33.00.
The increase in the size of the
book was made necessary be-
cause of the large and increas-
ing number of . house clubs, fra-
ternities and campus organiza-
tions. In the new book, fratern-
ities will be given only one page,
and some of the other organiza-
tions a half page. This will cut1
down the size of the book with-
out decreasing any of the mate-
ri 3.1 that goes into it.
t IHIMNTO.
SPEAK HERE DECU9
Former New York Governor on Pro-
gram of Oratorical Association
for Friday Night
HAS ATTAINED PROMINENCE
AS LA3VYER AND STATESMAN
Hon Charles Seymour Whitman,
former governor of New York, will
lecture in Hill auditorium Friday night
on "The Administraton of Criminal
Justice". Mr. Whitman has been ac-

HARDING DLVR
OPENING9ADDRESS
AT NEW CONGRESS
MANY RECOMMENDATIONS MADE
TO SENATE AND HOUSE
IN JOINT SESSION
ARMS DELEGATES ARE
PRESENT AT MEETING
President Proposes Flexible Tariff,
Funding of Allied Debt, and
Russian Food Relief
Washington, Dec. 6.-Launching of
the new session of congress was gom-
pleted today with the delivery by Pres-
ident -Harding of his opening address
at a joint session of the senate and the
house, made notable by the presence
of delegates to the armament limita-
tions conference.
Makes Many Proposals
Proposals for a flexible tariff, ad-
justable by the President or the tariff
commission; for an industrial tribunal
and for a constitutional amendment to
stop the flood of tax free securities
were the President's outstanding state-
ments on domestic affairs.
Turning to the international field
the President said of the armament
limitations conference, "that a most
gratifying world accomplishment is
not improbable."-
He also urges enactment of the
measures for funding the Allied debt,
proposed food relief for starving Russ-
ia, expressed satisfaction of the na-
tion being at peace and held out prom-
ise of aid to the world in war restor-
ation.
Gains Ready Response
Prompt response came to portions
of the President's recommendations.
Immediately after the joint session,
the senate passed a bill, urged by
Secretary Hoover of the department of
commerce, as head of the American

tive inI N<ew York judicial and admin- I relief administration, authorizing do-I

Every man and every woman on the
campus has a bit of the real Christinas
spirit stowed away in his heart some
place and now is the time to call it
forth and make that spirit grow. The1
S. C. A. will lead the campus in giv-
ing Christmas cheer to those childrena
in the hospitals and in the city to
whom Christmas does not mean the
mysteries of Santa Claus, the comfortst
of warm clothes and the joy of good
things to eat.
So tomorrow and Friday boxes will
be placed at various places on the;
campus and all are asked to give do-1
nations that more than 250 children
may have at least some of the joys1
of the happy season.
Then on Thursday, Dec. 15, at Lane
hall the kiddies will have a regular
Christmas party. Ice cream and can-.
dy will be in abundance and to make
the laughs more frequent, the Wom-
FOOTBALL SQUAS TO BE
IEN ANNUALSMOKER
DETROIT ALUMNI ENTERTAIN
MEN WITH YEARLY "BUST" i
SATURDAY
The annual football "Bust" givenk
by the University of Michigan club in
honor of the football men from their
Alma Mater will be held in Detroit
Saturday afternoon and evening of
Dec. 10.
The Varsity squad will leave at 1:10
o'clock Saturday afternoon on the7
D. U. R. In special cars provided by,
the Detroit club. On arziving in De-
troit they will march in a body to
the Madison theater, where they will;
be the guests of Mr. Kunsky, of that
city. At 6 o'clock dinner will be serv-
ed to the squad and the coaches at
the University club and to the reserves
and the freshmen at the Board of
Commerce.
The big "Bust' 'of the evening will
come at 7:30 o'clock when moving
pictures of the men in action in the
Ohio State game will be shown. The
men leave for home at 11 o'clock on
the D. U. R. .
Cabot Anxious
To :Have Lorenz
Make Talk Here'
"If it is found that final arrange-
ments made in Detroit indicate that
Dr. Adolf Lorenz will visit Detroit
either before or after Christmas va-
cation, I should certainly make every
effort to have Dr. Lorenz come to Ann
Arbor and address the medical stu-
dents," said Dr. Hugh Cabot, dean of
the Medical school.
Considerable controversy has arisen
over the question of whether Dr. Lo-
renz, famous Austrian "bloodless"
physician, is to be invited to visit De-
troit or not. Dr. Cabot has announced
that the University hospital with all
its facilities will be thrown open to
the noted man if a visit to Ann Arbor
can be arranged.
"Of course," said Dr. Cabot, "the vis-
it will probably not take place if Dr.
Lorenz' trip to Detroit occurs while
the University is closed for Christmas
vacation.
SOUTHERN STUDENTS MEET
TO PLAN SPECIAL TONIGHT
Members of the Dixie and Kentucky
clubs will meet in a combined session
at 7 o'clock tonight at the Union to
discuss plans for the proposed special
train which will leave Ann Arbor on
Dec. 16. This special will run to Cin-

cinnati and Louisville by way of eith-
er Detroit or Toledo.
All members interested in taking
this train are urged to attend the
meeting tonight.I

Students To Hake ChristmasMtaore
Cheerful For Children In Hospitalsl

en's league will put on several skits.
Trucks furnished by the R. O. T. C.
and private cars will carry the chil-
dren to the party. Those who can
furnish a car to aid in the kiddies'
good time a week from Thursday aft-,
ernoon are asked to inform Warren
V. Gilbert, 1547-J.
Those wishing to make contribu-
tions for the youngsters' Christmas
are asked to make them to Nelson
Joyner, 707 Oxford road.
Letters have also been mailed by the
S. C. A. to 150 fraternities, sororities,,
house clubs, league houses and dormi-
tories requesting those who can to
take care of one or more children,
furnishing them with clothes, toys and
other of the cheers that students have
so near the surface a few days -be-
fore Christmas. About 30 replies have
been received so far and it is request-
ed that those who expect to care for
at least one youngster inform Maynard
A. Newton, l66. as soon as possible.
In addition the S. C. A. is planning
a bit of Christmas for the University.1
On Monday a campus tree will be put
up in front of the Library, decorated,
and on every night from Monday to
Friday, lights will be lighted on the
tree.
School Of Music
Students To Give
Recital Tonight
Advanced students of the School of
Music will give the first students' re-
cital of the season at 7:30 o'clock this
evening at the school,
The complete program is as fol-
lows:
Prelude & Fugue, No. I and No. II
from "Well Tempered Clavi-
chord" .....................Bach
Doris Schmidt
Theme and Variations .........Proch
Birthday Song .............Woodman
Esther Hollands
Soirees de Vienne, No. 6 ........Liszt
Geraldine McHenry
Would God I Were the Tender Ap-
ple Blossom ............Old Irish
Myself When Young (Persian Gar-
den) ...................Lehmann
Thomas E. Dewey
The Nightngale ........Alebuff-Liszt
Marche Miltaire ....Schubert-Tausig
Max Ewing -
Concerto, No. 2, D minor........Spohr
(First Movemeft)
Clarence Post
BRONSON,'21,NAMED
RHODES' SCHOLAR
Bertrand H. Bronson, '21, was yes-
terday selected for a Rhodes' schol-
arship from the State of Michigan.
Bronson, who is now at the Harvard
graduate school, will leave for Eng-
land the fall of 1922.
The committee of selection is com-
posed of Rev. G. E. Barnes, Flint;
Dr. Brand Blanchard, of the philoso-
phy department, University of Michi-
gan; R. T. Taylor, of the English de-
partment, M. A. C.; James K. Wat-
kins, lawyer, of Detroit; and Dean
John R. Effinger, of the literary col-
I lege. All these men with the excep-
tion of Dean Effinger were Rhodes
scholars and two of them, Professor
Blanchard and Mr. Watkins, are grad-
uates of Michigan.

HUGE SUCCESS Il
ISCORED BY OPUl
IN INITI9l SHB
SIXTEENTH PRESENTATION
ANNUAL PRODUCTION
GAINS APPROVAL
COSTUMES ELABORAI
IN MIMES OFFERI
Book by NiedzielskI Gives Oppoil
for Unique Situations and
Clever Acting
(By Overton, IcBain, Lovej
Brilliant costumes, perfectly
cuted chorus work and a stor
hangs together characterize th
Michigan Union opera, "Make I
Two", the first presentation of
was given at the Whitney theate
night before an audience whici
thoroughly appreciative of th
tistry of the play.
Guske Gets First Honors
First honors belong to Ca
Guske, '22, who, asNemo,King
ile of Nowhere, substituted for
ter F. Kuhn, '22, who was take
yesterday afternoon.
Outstanding characters were
ard S. Stimson, '24, as "Skinen
clown lawyer; William R. Suth
'22, as Mrs. Houghton the don
ing parent of the heroine, who
the first round of applause; fol
meekly but with a raucous
trailed her husband, Wilfrid R
rie, '22L, as Mr. Houghton. Ne
ly humorous, the Poet, James
bach, '24,. eased over the tense
tions cleverly depicted in Leo L
zielski's book.
Of the chorus, Earl C. Powe
Howard B. Hoffman, '24, Geor
Welch, '24, deserve especial mi
Their dancing was of a profei
calibre. The plaintive melody,
land, by Howard A. Donarue, '
Arthur H. Holden, '24, will rate
the best of Opera music. Rivali:
was the haunting strain of
Found Me", given by the Poe
girls.
The play opens with a geni
tire on the Michigan Opera gir
compliments being exchanged
Julia Houghton, the leading la
peared. Throughout both acts
colored spectacles vied with u
situations, the whole theme
with a comic climax and bein
quately "topped off" with a Mal
Blue dance followed by the r
notes of "The Victors".
Hesitancy Present
Excellent generalship marke
presentation of each scene. La
life, in some of the musical nu
a stiffness i the parts of sev
the leading characters gave Ind
of first night hesitancy.
# receptive audience voiced th
preciation of the results of Mim
teenth offering-an operatic pro
which does credit to Michiga
and will do credit to Michigan.
There is something significani
the title of "Make It For Two."
who saw it last night will want
it again.
CONTEST WON B
JULIUS GLASG

SLIGHT PREFERENCE SHOWN
BUYERS FOR THOSE OF
GROUP B

BYI

First day's sale of basketball tickets
exceede expectations, according to of-
ficials in the Athletic association of-
fices, who said yesterday that the
tickets enjoyed a good sale through-
out the day. It is not expected, how-
ever, that the entire number of tick-
ets will be disposed of this week.
So far no decided preference has
ben indicated, the two groups of tick-
ets being sold in even proportions,
with perhaps a slight favor being
shown for group B, which includes
one more Conference game than the
first group.
Friday will be the last day that a
student will be allowed but one of the
groups, after which time he will be
permitted to purchase tickets for the
entire number of games on the home
floor. Due-to the fact that only stu-
dents are entitled to purchase the
tickets, the Athletic association re-
quires that the coupon book be pre-
sented, and that coupon 24 be given.
The price of the tickets, which admit
the holder to six games, is $2.
In 1910 Emma Goldman, the radical
speaker, violently attacked the Univer-
sity in a speech at Detroit because of
the unsympathetic attitude of the stu-
dent body toward her "advanced
ideas."
COUNCIL MEETS TONIGHT I
There will be a meeting of
the Student council at 7:15
o'clock tonight at the Union.
ANGUS GOETZ, President.

istrative circles for 20 years, and at
one time was prominent for achieve-
ments in the conviction of famous;
gunmen.
Mr. Whitman was assistant corpora-
tion counsel of the city of New York
from 1901 to 1903 when he became a
member and later president of thei
City Board of Magistrates. It was ini
this capacity that Mr. Whitman in-
stituted many of his reforms in the
handling of criminal cases. and it was
through him that special night courts1
were provided. In 1907 he was ap-
pointed by Governor Hughes as one
of the judges of the Court of General
Sessions. Later he served as district
attorney for the county of New York.
Through his administration of the dis-
trict attorney's office he was nomin-
ated in 1915 for governor of New
York, serving in that capacity until
1919, when he resumed his law prac-
tice.
MARY1GARDEN WILL BE
PATRONESS FOR OPERA
The following communication was
received in a personal letter from
Mark K. Ehlbert, '20, former member
of The . Daily staff, and now with the
Ehlbert Advertising service of Chi-
cago.
Dear Mr. Ehlbert:
You can certainly announce my
name as patroness for the Univer-
sity of Michigan Union opera for the
Chicago performance. I would like
very much to be able to come, but that
I cannot promise.
The 19th will be out of the ques-
tion, as I sing that evening, but I
might arrange to come on the 17th.
I cannot tell you today, but a week
from today I will be able to say more
definitely if I can come the 17th.
With best regards,

nations to the administration of sur-
plus medical and other stores of the
army.
Legislation to meet the President's
recommendation for a flexible tariff
also was proposed immediately by
Senator Smoot, Republican, Utah. He
introduced amendments to the pending
tariff bill which would authorize the'
President by proclamation to reduce
or increase tariff rates based upon Am-
erican valuation. Hearings on the
tariff bill will be resumed tomorrow
by the senate finance committee.
NINE EXTENSION
TALKS THIS WEEK
Nine lectures in six different Michi-
gan towns is the program of the Ex-
tension division for this week. George
Swain, expert photographer of the
1Jniversity, spoke in Detroit on Mon-
day and Tuesday. Prof. H. R. Cross,
of the fine arts department,,spoke
Tuesday at Wyandotte, and Prof. U.
G. Rickert, of the Dental college, gave
a lecture at Mendon on that day.
G. S. Lasher, of the rhetoric depart-
ment, talks at Pinconning today. Prof.
W. D. Henderson, of the Extension di-
vision, will speak Thursday at De-.
troit, and Friday at Lansing and Sand
Creek. On the same day Prof. T. E.
Rankin will deliver a speech at Lan-
sing.
AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY
ELECTS OFFICERS FOR YEAR
Following Dr. A. L. Ferguson's pa-
per on "The Action of Proteins in the
Presence of Electrolytes" given be-
fore the local section of the American
Chemical society in room 303, Chemis-
try building at 4:15 o'clock yesterday
afternoon, the society elected its offi-
cers for the current year. Prof. F.
E. Bartell was elected chairman; Prof.
H. H. Willard, councilor; Drs. A. L.
Ferguson, C. S. Schoepfle, and Prof.
W. L. Badger executive committee-
men; and Dr. C. C. Meloche, secre-
tary-treasurer.
Saner Addresses1'25 Foresters
"Forestry from the Geographer's
Viewpoint," was the subject of a talk
by Prof. C. O. Sauer, of the geography
department, before the freshman for-
esters last night in the Natural Sci,
ence building. The talk was follow-
ed by a busihess meeting. This was
the second of a series of bi-monthly
talks.

TEALDI SPEAKS TONIGHT
ON CONDITIONS IN

ITALY

Prof.. Aubrey Tealdi, head of the de-
partment of landscape design, will
speak on the subject of "Post-War1
Conditions in Italy" at 8 o'clock to-
night in the Cercle Francais room on
the second floor of the south wing
of University hall. The lecture, which
is to be delivered under the auspices
of the Circolo Italiano, will be open
to the public.
MATINEE MUSICAL SOCIETY
TO GIVE CONCERT AT UNION

Julius Glasgow, '23, was aws
silver loving cup, the gift of th
torical association, as first p
the Extemporaneous Speaking
test held last night in Sarah (
Angell hall. The second prize v
Charles Hodgman, '24, K. F.
'24, received honorable mentioi
The judges of the contest w
men from Delta Sigma Rho, i
honorary oratorical fraternity.
Nations at the Armament Con
in Washington" was the topic
upon.
Senseman Returns From Celin
Mr. Harley L. Senseman, dire
the Alumni catalogue office, re
to Ann Arbor yesterday from
Ohio, where he delivered two 1
on Saturday, Dec. 3, before th
cer County Teachers' associa
that city. The titles of his ad
were "The Best Modern Fictic
"Passing the Buck in Educati
Exclusive of schools and
there are eight libraries in th
of Michigan which have 40,0
umesnor over.

Sincerely yours,
MARY GARDEN.

SPANISH SOCIETY OFFERS I
THIRD LECTURE TOMORROW1

(Signed)

JUNIORS' NOTICE
All non-fraternity junior lits will
meet at 4 o'clock today in room 205
Mason hall for the purpose of dis-
cussing the J-Hop.
Junior architects will meet at 3
o'clock today in room 311 of the En-
gineering building for the purpose of
electing a J-Hop committeeman.

Carlos Garcia Prada, of the Spanish With the Union assembly hall in a
department, wil give ° the third of a Christmas setting, the Ypsilanti Nor,
series of six Spanish lectures held un- mal choir, Frederick Alexander con-
der the auspices of La Sociedad His- 'ducting, will give a program of Christ-
panica on the subject, "Colombia," at mas music of the nations at 4 o'clock
7:15 o'clock Thursday evening in Tap- next Sunday afternoon, under the au-
pan hall. spices of the Matinee Musical society.
All students of Spanish are invited Since the concert comes on Sunday
to attend. Tickets covering the four no tickets will be sold at the door, but
remainng lectures may be purchased should be obtained at Wahr's, Gra-
at the'door for 50 cents. ham's. or Tice's some time this week.

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