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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 02, 1921 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-10-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

ished every morning except Monday during the Univer-
by' the Board in Control of Student Publications.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use for
tion of all news dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
in this paper and the local news published therein.
red at the postoffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
tter.
cription by carrier or mail, $3.so.
es: Ann Arbor Press building, Maynard Street.
nes: Business, 96o; Editorial, 2414.
tmunications not to exceed 300 words, if signed,, the Sig-
tot necessarily' toappear inprint, but as an evidence of
d notices of events will be published in The Daily at the
n of the Editor, if left at or mailed to The Daily office.
i communications will receive no consideration. No man-
wil be returned unless the writer incloses postage.
Daily does not necessarily' endorse the sentiments ex-
n the communications.
fat's Going On" notices will not be received after 6 o'clock
vening preceding insertion.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
ING EDITOR ....... BREWSTER P. CAMPBELL
- Managing Editor.... .........Hu h W. Hitchcock
tor ................................ P. Lovejoy, Jr.
ditors-
M. B. Stahl G. P. Overton
R. E. Adas Hdmdughonambecnht
Paul Watzel Ewr abeh
F. 11. AMcPike
s..T. 3..Whinery, L. A. Kern, S. T. Beach, E. R.. Meiss
ent Editors...............T. S. Sargent, T. H. Adams
Editor.............................George Reindel
sEditor.. ... .. Elizabeth Vickery
Editor............. R. Meiss
Assistants
"y B. Grundy John Dawson Ben H. Lee, Jr.
ace B. Elliott Sidne s B. Coates Julian MackJ
k. Klaver Lowell S. Kerr Howard Donahue
thy Whipple H. E. Howlett Arnold Fleig
>n Koch Katherine Montgomery
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
ESS MANAGER ..........VERNON F. HILLERY
ng ............ .........F. M. Heath, A. J. Parker
on ... ...Natha* W. Robertson
... .- . .... ..... -. ---John eJ.r Ham els, Jr.
n . .......................... Herold C. Hul
Assistants
H. Willis Heidbreder Ttt yler Stevens
Walter K. Scherer Martin Goldring

tion to Michigan sustained after absence from Ann
Arbor that can well be emulated by the under-
graduates.
THE BLUEBOOKS AGAIN
As long as hope springs eternal in the human
breast, uncertainty will breed inflated expectations,
and, in the case of studies, inflated expectations are
conducive to carelessness. This is one of the most
important mal-influences exerted by the prevalent
although not all-inclusive faculty habit of delaying
the return of blue books, or failing to return them
at all.
If a student takes a bluebook in mathematics, he
may be able to figure up his approximate mark di-
rectly afterwards; but the vast majority of courses
in the University are not as definite as this subject,
and "right" or "wronk" cannot be applied to their
matter. For this reason the student in most
courses is at a loss to even guess the outcome of his
efforts until his bluebook is returned with the mark
of the instructor upon it.
It seems hardly fair to force a student in any
course to take one bluebook when he is still ignor-
ant concerning his mark on the written squizz pre-
vious. If the members of the faculty of Michigan
only realized how much a prompt return of blue-
books means to the students in their courses, it is
certain that there would be more concentrated ef-
fort upon their part toward speeding up the mark-
ing of bluebooks during the comning semester so
that the corrected examination papers may be re-
turned as soon as possible after the written quizz.
A FITTING MEMORIAL
The words, the deeds and the actions of the
great and immortal Roosevelt's, career should and
deserve to be preserved forever for the benefit of
generations to come - this is, in substance, the un-
derlying motive of those friends and admirers of
the colonel who are conducting a movement for the
collection of all letters, books, speeches and other
mementoes which the late president had written.
Such a program is deserving of the highest praise,
for its efforts will result in dedicating to the gen-
erations that will follow, invaluable records of the'
life of the great American.
President Harding, although he was at one time
engaged in a political contest with Roosevelt, has
paid the 'ltter the greatest tribute "which one man
could pay to another. He declared that Roosevelt,
man, soldier and diplomat that he was, was "the
third in America's great triumvirate, along with
Washington and Lincoln."
While some may-be unwilling to give the dead
ex-president praise as high as this, none can refuse
to admit that he was above all a great American
whose memory should be preserved. Collecting the
mementoes of his life is a fitting and certain way of
accomplishing this.
Th e Telescop e

I.-

A complete line of textbooks and si

,

for all colleges at both stores

GRAHAM
Both ends of the diagonal ivalk

I,-

DETROIT UNITED LINES
Ann Arbor and Jackson
TIME TABLE
(Eastern Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars--6.o a.
in., 7:as a. in., 8: io a. in. and1 hourly to 9:ioj
0 m.
Jackson Express Cars (local stops of Ann
Arbor), 9 :48 a. in. and every two hours to
9:48 p. in.
Local Cars East Bound- 55 a.m., 7:00 a.
in. and every two hours, to 9 :oo p. in., r :.oo
p. in. To Ypsilanti only-1i r:4o p. a., 2.25
a. n., :rs a. m.
To Saline, change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars West Bound-7:5 a. in., 2:4o p.
To Jackson and Kalamazoo-Limited cars:
8 :48, 10:44 a. in., 12:4S, 2:48,4:8
To Jackson and Lansing-Limited: 8 :48
p. in.

Fountain Pens
WATERMAN CONKLIN SWAN
COLD AND SILVER PENCILS

A LA RM C LOC K S
BIG BEN AND BABY BEN
HALLER and FULLER
STATE STREET JEWELERS

I

III

1921
2
9
16
23
39's

OCTOBER

3
10
17,
21
31

4
11
18
25

5
12
19
26

6
13
20
27

14
21
28

1921
1
15
22
29

electric Lamotps

TJ, B Parks

DY

:Fx ,

Persons' wishing to secure information concerning news for
.issue of The Daily should see the night editor, who has full
rge of all news to be printed that night.,
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 2, .1921
Night Editor-EDWARD LAMBRECHT
MODERN CHARITY
Viendicancy is a profession in the near East; in
aerica beggary has almost disappeared. In the
tern countries alms are given because the indi-
lual likes to feel that he has made a sacrifice for
:ther; in America, charity is now quite gen-
Lly employed to avoid poverty rather than to
sen its effects. It is the modern idea of preven-
n rather than cure.
I'he University of Michigan Fresh Air camp, fi-
aced by student' contributions and conducted by
ichigan men under the auspices of the Student
.ristian Association, is one of the outgrowths of
s modern attitude. It was a camp for boys who
linarily could not have afforded such a luxury -
e city street urchins dependent on themselves at
.st in part for support, and for boys from such
tittuions as the house of correction. Most of
em had never been at a camp before. Many had
ver seen the country.
At the camp they were under the tutelage of the
t type of Michigan men, They were given real
:n for models when it was in their very nature
set them up as heroes. They learned personal
anliness, honesty, generosity, cheerfulness,
ortsmanship, all the many virtues, from actual ex-
iple. It was modern charity at its best.
The flaw in present day giving is that it may be-
me so scientific that it is impersonal. It is much
rder for a man to give a dollar to a charitable or-
nization than to buy a famished tramp a square
al. Giving to organizations may become a duty.
t a pleasure. But as long as one can see the re-
lts of his generosity as clearly as they can be seen
the case of the Fresh Air camp, and as long as
e is interested enough to find out what they were,
actical charity is in no danger of extinction.
OUR YEARLING ATHLETES
The old difficulty of shortage of prep school ma-
ial that was felt most keenly here two or three
ars ago has been entirely eliminated, according
recent reports which indicate that desirable high
hool stars from all parts of the country have en-
red the, University this fall.
These men are more than welcome. Michigan is
eased that they have chosen to come here in the
ce of the inducements that must have been put
rward to persuade them to go -to any one of a
ore of other places, in the East, South, or West.
hey will find that gaining recognition in Michi-
n's athletics is worthy of their mettle; and fur-
ermore that this University is not slow to appre-
ite real merit.
Incidently this influx of athletes indicates that
hatever may be the other points involved in the
estion of Michigan and eastern competition, we
all not suffer greatly from lack of material by
ntinuing our present policy of emphasizing games
the West. It has been lamented that all good
ep school men were going elsewhere because of
:k of eastern games on our schedule. But when
en who have received the attention from sport
riters that some of those who enrolled here this
11 have, enter the University, it is conclusive that
is concern is without any real basis.
In the work that the alumni have done in helping
cure these prospects there is an example of devo-

NOTICE TO MEN
We do all kinds of high-class Hat
work at pre-war prices. Hats turned
inside out, with all new trimmings,
are as good as new.
FACTORY HAT STORE
171 PACKARD STREET
Telephone 1792
Shortitard, Typewriting, Seere-
tarial, and Commercial Courses.
Nw Term - Oct. 3rd
HAMILTON
BU 4INESS COLLEGE
A y , buys a brand
p r JnewCorona
portable tye-
writer. -Othermae
at attractive prices.
See us before youbuy.
SPECIAL to STUDENTS
A student without a typewriter is
badly hard rapped1 these dayi when
most colleg work must be typed to
bring the best marks.
For as little as $5.0 a month you
can now purchase a high grade
TYPEWRITER
from

See our exclusive

line at reasona

pc

Do you need a new study lamp, a ni
little light on your dresser, or an
efficient table lamp for

reading?

If so, see us.

THE DETROIT EDISON COMPANY

MAIN AND WILLIAM STREETS

PHONE 2300

0. D. MORRILL
17 Nickels Arcade

An Irruption
(In the vein of Noah Webster)
We obsecrate thee, activate,
Peruse this dithyrainbic
Whose diction waxes obdurate
Like saga, old Icelandic.
When, poignantly, nostalgia
Insouciance adduces
Toward erudite accomplishment,
And pleasurance seduces

',
..

HAS

THE WE'L.L

GROOMED

M AN

I,

Inveigh not standards adamant
Of culture salutary;
Evade the picture palaces
Enjoy the dictiohary.
Our Latest Song Entitled:
"Short Skirts Are Certainly Getting De Luxe."
Quoth Eppic Taff:
He died inside a Chinese restaurant,
John Henry Hyde;
The coroner when he was through announced:
"Chop-suicide."
One Scintillating Night
She-I thought you just told me you were going
to make it a special point this year neither to miss
nor neglect any opportunity that came your way?
Ile--Yes, I did say that. Iut why should you
remind me of it now
She---Well, there was a lvely dark spot back
there that you sailed aright past'!
Strictly Personal
(We'll let you in on this)
First half weeks are rather hard
On. campus terra firma,
llowever late, oh please, dear Erm,
Accept a line from Erma.
Stolen Thunder
Paper bathing suits have appeared in the East
and lots of the folks now go to the beaches just to
see what's in the papers. - Life.
Our idea of a real dual personality is the author
who had all Paris waiting for his to have a duel
with his nom de plume.
Famous Closing Lines
"Business started with a bang," said the new
hair-dresser as she made her first sale. ERM.

THE ADVANTAGE
x

'1

..

I_

*

i

Wherever he appears, the well groomed
man possesses the immediate advan-
tage of being attractive and pleasing
to the eye-lending him poise and
dominant bearing.
Hirsh, Wickwire Clothes are designed
to appeal primarily to men of this type
-and so have been developed to their
present state of perfection, not merely
to provide something better in ready-
to-wear clothing, but to take the place
of made-to-measure clothing.

Made from custom patterns in foreign
and domestic weaves and designed to
express a certain suavity of grace and
bearing, Hirsh, Wickwire Clothes con-
form to the usages of the foremost
tailors-yet one is saved the annoyance
and delays of tailoring try-ons. It goes
almost without saying that our offer-
ing of furnishings and haberdashery is
equally acceptable to men of the finest
discrimination.

I

HIRSH, WICKWIRE CLOTHES

WAGNER and COMPANY
FOR MEN SINCE 1848
STATE STREET AT LIBERTY

NIA r Orrrrlrll rrlYl l

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