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October 02, 1921 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 1921-10-02

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TODAY

DAY _ND NI(
SER'I,

0 AIWAId

.II. No. 7.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, OCTOBER 2, 1921

P

D SPEAKERS
lOUNGED FOR
~TURE COURSE

CL

STATESMEN, HUMOR-
ORATORICAL ASSO-
TION PROGRAM
kPPROPRIATION
TEST IN HISTORY

Irvin S. Cobb, Sir Philip Gibbs and
. Judge Ben Lindsey Appear
on List
Authors, statesmen and humorists
of America and England, many with
international reputation, will speak on
this year's Oratorical association pro-
gram, for which more money by $2,000
has been appropriated than in any
previous year in the history of the
department, according to an an-
nouncement given out yesterday. Ir-
vin S. Cobb, the famous humorist,
who will be heard Feb. 24 on "Home
Folks," holds a place late in the sea-
son.
Sir Phillip Gibbs of London, au-
thor, journalist and statesman, will
speak on "The Social Revolution in
England," and Judge Ben Lindsey of
Denver will tall on "Why Kids Lie."
The final lecture, which will be given
iarly in the spring, has been left open
in the hopes of engaging one of the
members of the Armament conference.
Maximillian, Hardin, Herbert Hoover
and others are possibilities for this
lecture.
The course was selected by the Ora-
torical association through the co-
operation of President Marion L. Bur-
ton and Profs. L. A. Strauss of the
Eng1ish department, Arthur Cross and
C. H. VanTyne of the history depart-
ment, C. T. Johnston of the col-
lege of engineering, Jesse Reeves of
the political science department, and
other faculty members.
The complete course is as follows:
Oct. 28-John Spargo, author, jour-
naltst, lecturer. Subject, "The Strug-
gle Between Bolshevism and Democ-
racy in Russia."
Nov. 18-Charles Rann Kennedy,
playwright, actor, and Edith Wynne
Matthison (Mrs. Kennedy), leading
lady with Henry Irving. Subject,
"Scenes from the Drama."
Nov. 26-Theodore E. Burton, ex-
senator, now congressman, Ohio. Sub-
ject to be announced.
Dec. 1-Prof. S, H. Clark, Univer-
sity of Chicago. Reading of John
Drinkwater's play, "Abraham Lin-
'coln." a
Dec. 9-Ex-Gov. Charles S. Whitman
of New York. Subject, "Administra-
tion of Criminal Justice."
Jan. 7-Judge Ben ~Lndsey ci Den-
ver. Subject, "Why Kids Lie."
Jan. 28-Sir Phillp Gibbs of Lon-
don, author, journalist. Subject, "The
Social Revolution in England."
Feb. 16-Harry Fanck, author,
traveler. ' Subject, "Oriental South
America" (illustrated).
Feb. 24-Irvin S. Cobb, humorist,
jornalist, author. Subject, "Home
Folks."
One other date will be announced.
Tickets for the entire course will be
on sale for $2,50 and $3 some time
next week.
RADIO TRY-OUTS WANTED
Radio operators, who have
had commercial experience and
who are interested in the estab-
lishment and operation of the
Western Conference Radio News
service, are asked to meet with
Franklin Johnston, '22E, at 7
o'clock Monday evening in the
Engineering society rooms.

REGENT AT M.A.C.
OPPOSES FRIDAY
John W. Beaumont, a Detroit attor-
ney, yesterday signified his intention
of resigning from the state board of
agriculture because of his objection to
the appointment of Prof. David Friday,
of the economics department, to the
M. A. C. presidency, according to the
Detroit News. When asked in a long
distance telephone call to Detroit re-
garding the matter, Mr. Beaumont re-
fused to give any information for pub-
lication.
CITY TO BE SCENE F
SUNITARIAN CONFERENCE
LIBERAL CHRISTIAN CHURCHES
HOLD THURSDAY SESSION
IN ANN ARBOR
Ann Arbor will be the scene of the
Thursday morning session of the
General Conference of Unitarian and
other Liberal Christian churches
wihch will be held here and in De-
troit Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday
and Friday of this week.
The Thursday session at the First
Unitarian church here will have as its
main feature the discussion of the
subject, "Our Obligations to Students
in School and College." The first pa-
per on this topic will be given by
Prof. John F. Shepard. The second
will be read. by Prof. Henry F. Cope,
of Chicago, who is general secretary
of the Religious Education society
and is well known in religious cir-
cles. The discussion will be closed by
Rev. Dr. Samuel M. Crother,. of
Cambridge, Mass., whose experience
with Harvard students and his abil-
ity os a speaker will recommend him
to all.
Expect Several Hundred
The several hundred speakers and
visiting debates will dine at 12:30
o'clo - the Union. Anyone who
cares to attend the luncheon may se-
cure reservations from Prof. A. H.
White, 514 Forest avenue, or at the
door. All guests, both men and wom-
en, are asked to use the north en-
trance. In the afternoon an oppor-
tunity -will bn, given fur sight-seeing
In and about the University.
Thursday evening the conference
will move back to Detroit, where the
Laymen's league will have charge in
the Temple Beth-el. Friday Rev. Dr.
Sidney S. Robins, of the local Unita-
rian church, will be one of the speak-
ers It was through Rev, Robins ef-
forts that Thursday's session is to be
held here.
Taft Is Conference Head
The conference will open with the
ministers' conference and Women's
Alliance meeting Tuesday in the First
Unitarian church at Detroit. The first
general conference session will take
place Wednesday at Temple Beth-el,
Detroit.
Ex-President William H. Taft is
president of the conference. Speakers
at the general session wil include
men of national fame. Among them
will be Rev. Dr. Robert S. Loring of
Milwaukee, and Prof. Henry W.
Foote, of Harvard Divinity school, for-
merly ministers of the Ann Arbor
Unitarian church; Rev. Dr. William
Wallace Fenn, dean of Harvard Di-
vinity school;. Rev. Dr. F. R. Griffin,
of Philadelphia; Rev. Dr. Abraham M.

Rihbany, of Boston, and Rev. Dr. Wil .
liam L. Sullivan] of New York city.
Ann Arboar High Loses to Kalamazoo

WOLVERINES HOLD MT, UNION
SCORELESS IN OPENING GAME
OF GRIDIRON SEASON,44 -0

ALL
GET

MICHIGAN PLAYERS
CHANCE IN CONTEST

STEKETEE, BANKS, USHER, KIPKE
COMBINE TO BAFFLE
VISITORS

Dunne at Lest Guard and Other
Linem'en Play Steady
Game
Michigan's football team opened its
1921 schedule by completely over-
whelming Mt. Union 44-0. Using every
man on the Varsity squad, Coach Yost
sent his team to an impressive vic-
tory over the visiting Ohio team. At
no time was Mt. Union within even
striking distance. Never was it even
within kicking distance as it was nev-
er able to advance the ball beyond
the center of the field.
Displaying a strong defensive and
always threatening on the offensive,
the Varsity was master of the sua-
tion at all times.. Yost chose to give
every man on the bench a chance to
get into the game. Shortly after the
second touchdown he kept a constant
string of new men pouring onto the
field, making it much harder to fol-
low the substitutions than the game.
Michigan's attack was essentially
that of straight football. Line plung-
es and end runs were the chief Var-
sity weapons of assault. There were
no open plays. The kicking of the
three'Michigan punters was satisfac-
tory.
i Three Backfields Used
The wealth of backfield material
showed to good advantage. Three
complete sets were used behind the
line with the work of each being
promising. The first group had the
edge on the later ones, but it was
quite evident that the competition for
permanent places behind the line will
be extremely keen. Steketee un-
corked some beautiful end runs and
nearly broke away for a touchdown
on the opening kickoff. Usher's line
plunging was noteworthy and the
first two scores were the result of his
assaults. Kipke played a strong game
and once or twice wriggled through
a broken field for several long runs.
Banks beginning at quarter led a good
attack.
Hard to Pick Star
Of the men who later carried the
ball, Uteritz, Roby, and Dean showed
latent ability and can be counted on
in the future. Searles broke away
for a touchdown but was called back
when one of the Michigan litemen
held. Captain Dunne played a good
steady, unsensational game at left
guard as did the rest of his men on
the ,forward wall.
All in all, it is hard to pick any
particular star. The team schowed
great possibilities, playing together
for the first game of the eyar. A rec-
ord breaking crowd for the opening
game filled the stands. A play by
play review of the game follows.
FIRST QUARTER
Capt. Duke Dunne won the toss and
chose to defend the west goal. Wag-
ner kicked off to Steketee who ran the
ball from his own 30 yard line to the
Mt. Union 15 yard line. Usher failed
through right guard, Kipke ht right
tackle for 1 yard. Usher added four
off left tackle. Kipke repeated with
four on same place, but failing to make
first down. Mt. Union's ball on her
left tackle. Michigan was penalized 5
when Goebel was off side, giving Union
first down. Madden held for no gain.
Wagner punted out of bounds on his
own 30 yard line. Steketee skirted
left end for 15 yards. Kipke made 2
thru center. Usher hit the line for 3.

Banks made 1 on a sneak. Steketee
carried the ball around right end for
first down on Union's 5 yard line.
Kipke and Steketee each made 2 thru
the line. Usher drove through for the
first, touchdown. Steketeekicked goal.
Michigan !, Mt. Union 0.
Banks received the kickoff on his
own 10 yard line and ran it back to
Mt. Union's 32 yard line., Usher fumbl-
ed, Kipke recovering. Steketee was
thrown for 5 yard loss when his in-
terference failed. Kipke failed to gain
on run around left end. Steketee punt-
ed out of bounds on Union's 27 yard
line. Wagner stopped an attempted
li'ne plunge by Dunne. Madden hit line
for 1 yard. Madden fumbled and re-
covered for no gain. Muirhead block-
ed Madden's punt, ball rollng to Un-
ion's 1 yard line where Goebel recov-
ered. A big hole was opened thru
left guard for Usher who went over
for second touchdown. Steketee kick-
ed goal. Score: Michigan 14, Mt.
Union 0.
Changes Frequent
Wagner kicked off to Kirk who re-
ceived on his own 20 yard line, who
returned it for 16 yards. Roby sent
in for Usher. Swan for Dunne. Rich-
ards for Kirk. Kipke failed to gain.
Roby made 6 around left end but fail-
ed to gain on the next play. Steketee
punts to Union's 15 yard line. Muir
head off-side. Michigan penalized 5
yards. Walker was thrown for a 4
yard loss. Wagner punted to Michi-
gan's 48 yard line. Banks made 8
thru left tackle. On a 40 yard run
around left end, Stektee scored' the
third touchdown. Score: Mibigan
21 Mt. Union 0.
Kipke received the kick-off on his
own 5 yard line and carried the ball
thru an open field to the center of
the gridiron. Steketee made 9 yards
arouiad right end. Roby ploughed thru
the line for 5 yards and it was first
down on Mt. Union's 35 yard line.
Banks made 4 thru center. On a run
around left end Kipke broke loose but
fell on his own 20 yard line. On the
next play he made three more. Stek-
etee failed to gain. Roby and Stek-
etee made first down on two line
plunges. Roby made three yards off
tackle. On the next play Roby went
thru the left side for a touchdown.
Steketee kicked goal. Score: 111khb
igan 28, Mt. Union 0.
Banks received the kick-off on Mich-
igan's 10 yard line and returned it to
the 31 yard line. Muirhead was in-
jured and Garfield was sent in at
right - tackle. Banks failed to gain
but made 5 yards on a second attempt.
Roby made first down on a plunge
thru right tackle. Steketee carried
the ball to the middle of the field
where the first half ended.
SECOND HALF
Michigan opened the second half
with an almost entirely new line-up.
Paper substituted for Steketee, Fair-
bairn for Cappon, Uteritz for Banks,
Swan for Wilson, Johns for Vick,
Crawforth for Dunne, and Landowski
for Kipke. Mt. Union substituted Ruch
for Wagner,
Roby kicked off to Madden who was
downed on his own 20 yard line. Mt.
Union made frst down on their own
35 yard line on a forward pass. Myers
to Ruch.. Myers went thru right tackle
for 10 yards. Mt. Union kicked to
Kipke, who was injured and left the
game. Landowski went in for Kipke.
Roby failed to gain at right. Paper
failed thru the line. Whiteman plock-
ed Michigan's attempt at a forward
pass. Uteritz punted to Union's' 15
yard lihe. Michigan off side. Five yard
penalty. Ruch failed to gain. Mt.
Union punted to the 50 yard line. Pa-
per made two yards thru center. Ut-

eritz skirted left end for 5 yards. Roby
(Continued on Page Ten)

PLAN RECEPTION
FOR '25 WOMEN
Dean Myra B. Jordan will receive
the women of the freshman class at 4
o'clock Monday afternoon in Barbour
gymnasium, at a meeting in which
plans for class organization will be
discussed. With Mrs. Jordan in the
receiving line will be Mrs. Marion L.
Burton, Mrs. John R. Effinger, Dr.
Eloise M. Walker, Miss Marion Wood,
and Miss Marian Dawley, the heads of
the various dormitories, and Miss
Mildred Sherman,.
The meeting is for freshmen only,
and it is meant primarily for them to
meet one another, and to form plans
for class organization.
Immediately after Mrs. Jordan's re-
ception, at 6 o'clock, all freshman
women are invited to the annual jun-
ior adviser's supper which will be
held in the gymnasium. All girls of
the class of '25 are invited whether
they have advisers or not.
Talks will be-made by Dean Myra B.
Jordan, Edna Groff, '22, president of
the Women's league, Gertrude Boggs,
'22, president of the Y. W. C. A., and
Helen Bishop, '22, president of the
Women's Athletic association.
The supper will be followed by a
play in Sarah Caswell Angell hall.
COOLEY ILL HEAD u. 5S'
ENGINERIN SOCETIE

!MEDICAL POLIE
TRAINING RES1
-DR. HUGH C
DOCTORS' CHARGE UNI
PRACTITIONEERING
JUSTIFIABLE
HOSPITAL NOT TO ]
PROFESSION IN S

Dean

Points Out Course A
Between Two Radical
Extremes

SUCCEEDS .HOOVER DOES
EXrECT TO LEAVE
UNIVERSITY

NOT

Dean M. E. Cooley, of the College of
Engineering and Architecture, was
elected president of the American
Engineering council of the Federated
American Engineering societies Fri-
day night, Sept. 30, at the meeting of
the council at Washington, D. CI. Dean
Cooley succeeds Herbert C. Hoover.
who resigned the office upon accept-
ing his present position as secretary
of commerce in President Harding's
cabinet. He will take office at once.
Dean Cooley, does not expect his
election to the new position will ne-
cessitate tie severing of his connee-
tion with the University.
FORD PLANS CAMPAIGNS ON
NEWBERRY SEAT IN SENATE.
. *
Dearborn, Oct. 1.-"As long as
Senator Newberry is in the Senate, I
will not stop protesting against the
illegal use of money in election con-
tests," said Henry Ford yesterday. He
went on to say that he is planning a
popular campaign in every state whose
senator voted to clear New.berry of his
charges, as soon as the Senate has
taken action on the report of its
special committee which decided upon
investigation to give the senator from
Michigan his seat.
Judge Wilkins Dies at Detroit'
Detroit, Oct. 1. - Judge Charles
Trowbidge Wilkins of the Recorders
court here died at 4 o'clock this
morning in Henry Ford hospital aft-
er an illness of less than three days.
He graduated from the. Literary col-
lege at Michigan in 1883 entered the
Harvard Law school and afterward
studied law in Germany and elsewhere
in Europe. -Y

"I was glad to see that the editor-
ial which appeared in Saturday's
Daily supported my opinion on the
matter of the management of the new
hospital," said Dr. Hugh Cabot, dean
of the Medical school.
"There are two extremists in the
controversy over this matter," he con-
tinued. - "One is what might be called
the radical social or welfare worker.
who ardently advocates public health
insurance-that is, the taking over of
the practice of medicine by the state,
which would, of course, do away with
or at least injure private practicion-
ers. Then thete is the other extreme
-the mercenary doctor who is not so
much a doctor as a business man. He
fears for his practice, and spreads
.abroad the fallacious report that the
state and the University of Michigan
are trying to socialize the medical pro-
fession-to revolutionize the relation
between the medical profession and
the public.
,,Nether View Adopted
"I do not think, and never did think
that there was as much genuine dis-
agreemeit as appeared upon the sur-
face, for I think that most of the
talking that was done was by these
business-meu' physicians or by others
who had been influenced by their argu-
ments. As a matter of. fact,, the n-
versity of Michigan has taken a stand
which might in a way be termed half-
way between these two extremes, and
in a way totally separate from either.
"We realize that the state cannot
take over the medical profession, for
such a program would be based on the
assumption that the practice of med-
icine is a commodity' that canv be
bought and sold. It cannot. Medical
goods can-yes-but the confidence
and good will between the individual
and his physician, which is, after all.
the foundation of the practice of med-
icine-that can never be bargained for
arbjtrarily in' terms of money.
Purpose of School Defined
The University intends doing abso-
lutely no injury to the profession,and
does not plan to practice medicine,
but neither does it think of altering
its fundamental policy, which is bas-
ed upon an argument which neither of
these opposing factions seems to have
taken into consideration.
"The Medical school of the Univer-
sity is here for the obvious purpose
of training doctors. Anything that
would further this prime interest be-
longs in our policy, and it is certainly
true that in order to gain for our
teaching staff a group of first-class
clinical teachers, we must provide
sufficient remuneration in both mon-
ey and opportunity to induce them to
come here. We cannot demand all of
this from the tax-payers. Therefore
the only logical thing to do is to take
in patients who are able to pay for
their care and who desixe to come
to us for treatment. We have no in-
tention, as I have previously stated,
of injuring anyone or anything, and
certainly not the medical Drofession of
the State of Michigan.
Pictures by Lyndon and Kitson
Pictures of the football men, appear-
ing in The Daily's Sunday Magazine,
are reprinted through the courtesy o
Lyndon and Ktson.

FOOTBALL SCORES

Ann Arbor High's hopes for
football championship received t
first set-back of the year when
lost this morning to Kalamazoo
the score of 13 to 7. Ann Arbor
7-6 in the first half but lost in
second half.r

the
,heir
she
by
led
the

Michigan Aggies 28, Alma 0.
Chicago 41, Northwestern 0.
Wisconsin 28, Lawrence 0.
Ohio State 28, Wesleyan. 0.
Minnesota 19, North Dakota 0.
Notre Dame 57, Defoe 10.

PrlrrpllriM IAIIYrYYI rlrliirrror lrrrr rrli r r I I
S

FRANK A.

Free

Lecture

AT WHITNEY

EONARD, C. S. B.

ON

THEATRE TODI

OF CHICAGO

ILLINOIS

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