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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

December 04, 1921 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-12-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY,

THE.ICHGANDAIL SDAY

OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY
OF MICHIGAN
ublished every mornn except Monday during the Univer-
ear by the Board in Control of Student Publications.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
he Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use for
ication of all news dispatches credited to it *r not otherwise
d in this paper and the local news published therein.
ntered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second

>cription by carrier or tnail, $3.50.
es: Ann Arbor Press building, Maynard Street.
nes: Business, 960; Editorial. 2414.

Communications not to exceed 300 words, if signed, the sig-
:ure not necessarily to appear in print, but as an evidence of
h, and notices of events will be published in The Daily at the
cretion of the Editor, if left at or mailed to The Daily office.
signed communications will receive no consideration. No man-
ript will be returned unless the writer incloses postage.
The Daily does" not necessarily endorse the septiments ex-
ssed in the communications.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
LNAGING EDITOR .......... BREWSTER P. CAMPBELL
sistant Managing Editor..................Hugh W. Hitchcock
y Editor ................................ E. P. Love oy, Jr.
ght Editors-
R. E. Adams G. P. Overton
Edward Lambrecht M. B. Stahl
Hughston McBain Paul Watzel
torial Board Chairman.........................T. J. Whinery
istants-
S. T. Beach E. R. Meiss
L. A. Kern Leo H ershdorfer
iday Magazine Editor................Thornton W. Sargent, Jr.
hange Editor..............................George E. Sloan
sic Editor .................................Sidney B. Coates
orting Editor ................................ George Reindel
men's Editor ............................. Elizabeth Vickery
mor Editor................................ E R. Meiss
Assistants
R. N. Byers L. L. Fenwick B. H. Lee
W. 'B. Butler H. B. Grundy J. E. Mack
A. D. Clark Agnes loh-mquist athrine Montgomery
Harry C. Clark H. E. Howlett R. C. Moriarity
.P. Comstock Marion Kerr R. B. Tarr
L.o.hm P. Dawson L. S. Kerr Virginia Tryon
*A.Donahue M. A. Klaver Doroth hipple
W. F. Elliott Marion Koch L. L. ost

a long way toward accounting for the fact that while
we have never had a stadium drive here, we have
our present manmoth plant. So far improvement
campaigns such as recently held at Illinois and Ohio
have been unnecessary here. The burden has been
distributed the easiest way by carrying over a sur-
plus each year, and unless the Athletic association
changes its present policy, future additions will be
taken care of in the same way.
That we are getting off, easily under the present-
conditions here as compared with elsewhere is
shown by a reference to rates at other Conference
schools. The following figures are for the season
of 1920-1921. At Illinois athletic books costs nine
dollars; at Chicago, ten dollars; at Iowa, ten dol-
lars ; at Ohio, eight dollars without basketball
games ; at Wisconsin, seven fifty ; and at Minnesota,
seven dollars without baseball. Michigan's fee is
six dollars without basketball, and because of the
relation between the size of the gymnasium and the
student body it is a physical impossibility for each
student to see more than two games a season if he
goes only in his turn.
An increase in the cost of things is always hard
to take but if all the angles to the admission situa-
tion are considered it is hard to escape the conclu-
sion that the plan adopted by the Regents is only
fair and reasonable.

Narcissus Bulbs with BR ws a t
loth Ends of the Diagonal Walk

I

J

DJETRlOIT 1UNITED) LINES
Ann Arbor and Jackson
TIME TABLE
( [~a terni Standard 'Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars-6.os a
"7:3 a. ni., 8: o . in. and hourly to 9: o
Jaekson Express Cars (local stops of Ann
:rbor), 9:48 a. in. and every two hours to
-'48 P. rn.
Local Cars East Bound-5:55 a.m., 7:00 a.
n and every two hours to 9:oo p. in., xr:ot,
m. To Ypsilanti only--x x1:4o p. in., 2.25
'L'o Saline, change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars West Boaund-7;5oa. M., 2:40 p.
To Jackson and Kalamazoo-Limited cars,
:48, Io:4i a. nt., :48, 2:48, 4:48.
To Jackson and Lansing--Limited: 8:0
. i.

Gifts That Last.

3iruwtr

~'i~nrrwuri

t

J. B. Young

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
BUSINESS MANAGER ............. VERNON F. HILLERY
Advertising .......................F. M. Heath, A. J. Parker
Publication ............................. Nathan W . Robertson
Acounts .. ..a....... ....John J. Hamels Jr.
Ciirculation' ............................... Herold C. Hunt
Assistants
Burr L. Robbins Richard Cutting H. Willis Heidbreder
W. Cooley James Prentiss W. Kenneth Galbraith
L. Beaumont Parks Maurice Moule J. A. Dryer
Walter Scherer 'kaltin Goldring Richard Heideman
Edw, Murane Tyler -Stevens T H- Wolfe
David Park Paul Blum
SUNDAY, DECEMBER 4, 1921
Night Editor-HUGHSTON M. McBAIN
Assistant-Leo J. Hershdorfer
Proofreader-Robert W. Cooper
Assistant-Egbert R. Isbell
THE ADMISSION SITUATION
It is only natural for members of a student body
which has during the past enjoyed the privilege of
admission to all the University athletic contests of
the year at a blanket price, to become concerned
when the announcement is made that one sport has
not been included in the bill of fare for this season.
On its face, to some, this omission smacks of injus-
tice.
But a consideration of the facts, both in connec-
tion with athletics at Michigan and elsewhere, gives
the decision of the Regents in charging extra for
basketball games a different complexion.
The first thing about the situation which might
easily be overlooked is the rise in the cost of athlet-
ics that has taken place in recent years and its rela-
tion to students' fees. The rate charged this fall
for membership in Mihigan's Athletic association
was just one dollar more than the amount fixed in
1912. In the meantime tuition here, which in 1915
was forty-nine dollars, has increased to ninety-two.
At other schools it has increased more, in many
cases, having gone up two hundred and twenty-five
dollars at Leland Stanford, and one hundred dollars
at Johns Hopkins, Pennsylvania, and Harvard, be-
tween 1914 and now. The same causes that have
been working to necessitate higher tuition fees have
increased the cost of college athletics. In this ac-
tivity expenses are no longer at the 1914 stage. For
example footballs that then retailed for five dollars
are now more than ten; the old one-and-a-quarter
baseball now costs two-fifty; and all along the line
sporting goods have practically doubled in cost.
'Railway fares, which make up an important item of
expense, are more than one and a half times what
they were in those balmy days. Hotel bills and the
rest have increased in proportion. The cost of main-
taing athletic teams is vastly different now as com-
'pared with he time when the five dollar blanket fee
was established.
It is also worth while to note that when this min-
imum was fixed basketball admissions were not cov-
ered by it. This game was established as a Varsity
sport in 1917- and admissions to it were "thrown in".
No increase in the blanket tax was made. Since then
the game has been carried on at an annual loss.
As is usually the case in collegiate athletics, foot-
ball has been standing the losses incurred by other
Michigan sports. It is our only paying sport, as is
illustrated by the fact that during the 1920-1921
season basketball ended with a $7,ooo deficit, base-
ball ran approximately $5,ooo short, and track was
a loser by $13,000. Furthermore the gridiron sport
must pay for the upkeep of Ferry field, which is
generally considered as well kept as any other in the
country, and which, like a good golf course, takes
a lot more money to maintain than might be imag-
ined, costing about $I5,ooo annually.
It is true that even after these items have been de-
ducted, a surplus remains, yet whatever is left over

FAME
That Michigan sends her sons into many fields of
achievement has ever bean a source of pride to the
University. Yet in the recent popular selection of
Michigan's six most prominent alumni, conducted
by the Michiganensian, the result was surprising in
the variety of careers which the winners repr-
sented.
Business and politics furnished Edwin Denby,
'96, who gained the largest number of votes in his
capacity as secretary of the navy under the present
administration. Next in the popular opinion was
James Rowland Angell, '90, of the educational
sphere, recently inaugurated president of Yale uni-
versity. There followed Dr. William James Mayo,
'83M, who has achieved universal recognition for
his advanced surgery, and Harry M. Daugherty,
'8L, representing the law profession as attorney-
general of the United States.
The last two notables selected are considerably
younger than those with whom they have been
classed, and are engaged in still other fields of
work. One, a professional baseball player, may to
some .seem unworthy of a place alongside his col-
leagues who have risen in the more firmly estab-
lished professions. Nevertheless, the athlete has
succeeded in the pursuit which he chose, and the
name-_of George L. Sisler, '1 5E, ranks among the
foremost players in baseball at the present time.
Journalism contributed the sixth prominent alum-
nus on the list in the person of J. Avery Hopwood,
'05. In the field of light drama this playwright is
perhaps unexcelled, 'and he last year held the record
of being the only writer ever to have four success-
ful products of his pen playing on Broadway at one
time.
Not everyone can enter into the same pursuit, just
as not everyone can be president of the United
States. The world requires a myriad of different
activities to be supported in order that man may
continue to live. For this reason it is not so much
the attaining of the highest positions which counts
as the achievement of success in that towards which
one sets out.
The men who have been chosen as Michigan's
most prominent alumni have realized this success.
There are hundreds of other notable sons on her
roll of honor, but it is gratifying to note that the six
winners represent as many different activities in
life.

NOTICE TO MEN
We do all kinds of high-class Ha!
work at pre-war prices. lI bts turned
nide out, with all new trimmings.
are as good as new.
FACTORY HAT STORE
417 t lull) TRmEETr
Telephone--1712

1921 DECEMBER
S M T W T
1
4 5 6 7 8
11 12 13 14 15
1S 19 20 21 22
25 26 27 28 29

1921
F S
2 3
9 10
16 17
23 24
30 31

Make Selection Now.
A Small Deposit Will Hold Goods
Until Christmas
HailerF& Fuller
State St. Jewelers

A4

I

hn

CAN YOU BELIEVE IT?

ALL

MEN'S

HIGH

SHOES

at a pair

4

IT'S A FACT
REGULAR "RUBY" SHOES TOO

'4
I

A Ifrrb

ol *

tb ,

4inr.

'The Telescope
On With the Dance
She used to be my steady girl; -
It just gives me the jimmies
To think she isn't steady now,
Because she always shimmies.
-Agusta Wind.

NICKLES ARCADE

Sarah Bernhardt, at the age of 76, has offered
lease a Paris theater provided that the contract1
for 25 years. Isn't that the true spirit of '76?

to
be

Quoth Eppie Taff:
His girl now mourns
For Jerry Gard.
He fell for her
And hit too hard.
Just Jaz
While Mr. Hoper and Miss Flopper were dining
at the Union some days ago one of the waiters in
the kitchen dropped a tray of dishes with a pro-
longed crash.
Immediately the gallant Mr. Hopper arose, made
his bow, and said, "Shall we dance, Miss Flopper?"
-Iva Kold.
Suggestions for Young Inventors
Construct a sulphur tipped cigarette which ab-
solves the necessity of carrying matches. Such an
invention will net millions to its originator. -
N. B.-The Telescope demands only a ten per cent
royalty for the use of its ideas.
Famous Closing Lines
"I'm in a ticklish position," said the man as he

F-
"When You Buy, Buy Quality"
Imported and Domestic
Overcoats - the most complete show-
ing we have ever displayed.
Hirsh, Wickwire, hard finish
English, soft Irish frieze
$35.00 -$75.00
WAGNER & COMPANY
ri .Men sinse.14$
STATE STREET AT LIBERTY

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