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December 04, 1921 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-12-04

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THME WEATHER
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TODAY

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ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AMD NIGHT W1
SERYICE

VOL. XXXI. No. 60

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, DECEMBER 4, 1921

PRICE FIVE CEI'

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TN ASKETBA9LL
SCHE011LES FIXED
CONFERENCE OFFICIALS ARRANGE
ATHLETIC PROGRAMS OF ALL
BIG TEN SCHOOLS
WOLVERINES DRAW GRID
GAME WITH VANDERBILT
Iowa-Yale, Chicago-Princeton, Form
Big Intersectional Clashes
for 1922
(Special to The Daily)
Chicago, Dec. 3.- Representatives
of the Western Conference schools met
here today and arranged the schedules
for football, baseball and track for
the coming year.
The Michigan football schedule,
which is now complete with three
games outside of the Conference, is
announced as follows: Sept. 30, Case
at Ann Arbor; Oct. 14, Vanderbilt at
Nashville; Oct. 21, Ohio State at Co-
lumbus; Oct. 28, Illinois at AnnAr-
bor; Nov. 4, M. A. C. at Ann Arbor;
Nov. 18, Wisconsin at Ann Arbor;
Nov. 25, Minnesota at Minneapolis.
Two Changes Noted
But two changes are noticed, they
game with Vanderbilt, which is the
first with that school since 1914, and
the throwing of the M. A. C. 'game
toward the end of the season.
Ohio State effected a three yer ar-
rangement with Iowa, two games to
be played in Columbus and one at
Iowa City. Announcement of a game
scheduled between. Iowa and Yale at
at Ann Arbor; May 29, iWsconsin at
meeting. Princeton will invade the
West this year, playing Chicago at
Stagg field, Oct. 28.
Baseball Schedule
The baseball schedule for the com-
ing season was arranged as follows:
April 22, Illinois at Ann Arbor; April
29, Wisconsin at Madison; May 1, Chi-
cago at Chicago; May 6, Iowa at Ann
Arbor; May 12, 13, Indiana at Bloom-
ington; May 15, Ohio at Columbus;
May 20, Illinois at Urbana; May 26,
Iowa at Iowa City; May 27, Chicago
St to and Ann Arbor; May 13, Illinois
Ai Arbor; June 3, Ohio at Ann Ar-
b.
The track schedule was made as
follows: Feb. 25, Chicago at Ann Ar-
bor; March 4, indoor relays at Illi-
nois; March 18, Conference indoor
meet at Evanston; March 25, Cornell
at Ithaca; April 22, Drake relays at
Des Moines; April 29, Pennsylvania
relays at Philadelphia; May 6, Ohio
mittee to secure Eddie Rickenbacker,
at Ann Arbor; May 20, Chicago at Chi-
cago; June 3 outdoor Conference meet
at Iowa City.
Geoffrey Chaucer was the first to as-
sume the title of poet-laureate of Eng-
land.

SCENARIOS DEAL
WITH UNIVERSITY
1Scenarios already submitted for The
Daily's University movie contest and
turned over to the producer have
drawn favorable comment.. Most of
the plots have dealt with University
life in such a way that practically all
the scenes may be taken- on the cam-
pus. The producer urges that all
students considering submitting con-
tributions to the contest send them in
as soons as possible in order that the
work of outlining the scenes and sel-
ecting the cast for the accepted story
may be begun soon. All students of
the University are eligible to enter
the contest excepting members of The
Daily editorial and business staffs.
Contestants may meet a represent-
ative of the moving picture produc-
ing company in the publications read-
ing room, on the second floor of the
Press building, from 2 to 4 o'clock any
day this week . excepting Saturday.
Conditions of the contest may be found
on page eight of today's Daily.
Six o'clock next Saturday evening,
Dec. 10, is the hour after which posi-
tively no contributions will be ac-
cepted.
FRIEDMAN PLAYS
TO6MOROW NlIGHT

STATE RELIGIOUS
CONFERENCE ENDS

OPERA PLAYERS SPEND DAY BEFORE
MIRRORS AND POSING FOR CAMERA

Delegates Consider Modern
lenis Concerning
Ministry

Prob.

PASS RESOLUTION TO MAKE
CONVENTION ANNUAL EVENT
As an indication of the spirit pres-
ent at the State Christian Callings
Conference for college men, which
closed yesterday afternoon, is the de-
termination to attenda-the conference
at any cost which was shown by the
delegation from Alma college in mak-
ing the trip in a motor truck. The
Alma delegation is the largest group
from any single school outside of the
University, comprising 23 men.
The representatives from the other
14 colleges and junior colleges who
totalled more than 150 and the large
number of University men were
equally as enthusiastic. The purpose
of this conference, which was the
second of its kind held here, is to put
before the college men, of the state
the program of the modern church
and allied fields for the future, both
to the men who planned to enter these
definite fields and others who in the
future would make up the laity, ac-
cording to Dr. H. R. Chapman of the
Ann, Arbor Baptist church, chairman
of the advisory committee.
Dr. Allen, Chicago, Speaks
Following the opening banquet Fri-
day night the first session was held at
8:30 o'clock yesterday morning in the
auditorium of Lane hall, which was
used for all themeetings. Dr. Ernest
Bourner Allen, pastor of the Pilgrim
Congregational church of Chicago, was
the first speaker. In developing his
topic of "The Christian Ministry", Dr.

Members of the company for "Make
It for Two", the sixteenth annual
Michigan Union opera, were kept busy
all day yesterday fitting costumes and
being photographed. Lester, of Chi-
cago, who designed the costumes for
this year's productionarrived in town
yesterday and personally supervised
the fitting. He expects to remain here
until Wednesday.
More than 60 photographs were tak-
en of members of the cast and chorus
both singly and in groups. An expert
photographer from Detroit took the
pictures on the stage of the Union
theater, beginning early in the morn-
ing and continuing throughout the
day. These pictures, which will ap-
pear in the Detroit and Chicago pa-
pers soon, will give an idea of how
the company will look behind the foot-
lights.
Rehearsals are continuing, the show
being entirely gone through last night
with great success. Dress rehearsals
will be held this afternoon and night
at, the Whitney and also tomorrow
afternoon. These last touches will be
put on at the theater so that the right
atmosphere and lighting effects may
be had and the final polish acquired

J-LITS TO RE-ELECT
HOP CHAIRMAN MONDAY
Re-election of J-Hop .commit-
teemen fQr the junior lit class
will be held at 4 o'clock Monday
afternoon in Newberry hall audi-
torium, according to the an-
nouncement of T. P. Banksclass
president.
It was also emphasized that
only those members of the class
whose dues for this semester
were paid would be. allowed to
vote. A representative of the
Student council will be present
at the meeting, and the names of
all voters will be carefully
checked, only the votes of those
eligible to ballot being consid-
ered.
For the benefit of those who
have not paid their dues, the
booth in University hall will be
open all day tomorrow where
dues will be accepted.

before the first appearance
night.

Tuesday

ECKEBRLL PICKS
VICK FOR SECONI
ALL WESTERN--1

ATLTCOFFICIALS SAY CHARGE RBS1BL 'SM SSF1

I

Own

Compositions, Works of Chopin
Hold Largest Place on
Program

KNOWN AS ONE OF FOREMOST
PIANISTS IN THE COUNTRY
With a program on which the works
of Chopin and his own compositions
hold the largest place, Ignaz Fried-
man will give the third concert on the
Choral Union series at 8 o'clock to-
morrow night in Hill auditorium.
This popular Polish pianist-compos-
er made his New York debut in Jan-
uary, 1921, an appearance calling
forth from James Huneker the words,
"The biggest pianistic hit of the sea-
son." Since that time he has given
many recitals in American music cen-
ters and the success of his season's
tour is at its height.
He will offer the following program:
I
(a) Sonata, Op. 90.........Beethoven
Allegro
Rondo-Allegreto
(b) Chaconne ..........Bach-Busoni
Y . II

Association Fees Have Not Advanced
in Proportion to Other
Expenses
SALE OF TICKETS'STARTS
TUESDAY; $2 PER GROUP

(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
(e)

Nocturne, Op. 63..........Chopin
Ballade, Op. 42..........Chopin
Valse, C Sharp Minor .... Chopin
Two Etudes, Op. 25.......Chopin
Polonaise, Op. 53.......Chopin

III
(a) .Two Viennese Dances ......
.............Friedman-Gaertner
(b) Etude .................Friedman
(c) Les Revelences........Friedman
(d) Tannhauser Overture.......
..................Wagner-Liszt

Allen said that there was one thing Fairness of the charge of $2 for six
every man could do better than any- basketball tickets, the sale of which
thing else and it was his duty to dis- will start Tuesday, was pointed out
cover that thing. He stated that a yesterday by officials of the Athletic
person should early determine his life association. The charge follows ac-
work and concentfate his efforts on tion of the Board of Regents, who
whatever that choice was. In choos- passed a motion authorizing a reason-
fing this life work, he pointed out that able price for admission to indoor
a person should consider whether it sports.
would give him a living, opportunities The fees of the Athletic association,
for growth, opportunities for service. it was declared, have not advanced in
The second session at 9:30 o'clock proportion to the other expenses in-
was addressed by Dr. A. Ray Petty, curred at the University and at the
pastor of the Judson Memorial church same time the expenses of the as-
of New York city and who is con- sociation have doubled. " In 1915 tui-
ducting a big work in the slums of tien for resident students in the Lit-
that city, on the subject "Christian erary college was $49, while now it is
Thinking for the New Day". He said $82; advances in other schools and
that the thing the world needed more colleges are in proportion. The ath-
of today was the kind of thinking that letic fee during this period of time was
characterized Jesus. Some of the raised from $5 to $6, and basketball
qualities of Christ that everyone contests were inaugurated.
should strive for he said were help- Expenses Increase 100 Per Cent
fulness, sympathy, democracy, cour- It was pointed out that the expens-
age, and self-sacrifice, es of the Athletic association, includ-.
6Y" Secretary Gives Talk ing railroad fare, hotel bills, meals,
The last of the morning sessions, salaries of coaches, and supplies, have
at 10:45 o'clock, was addressed by Dr. increased roughly 100 per cent. In
A. G. Studer, general secretary of the spite of this fact, the athletic fee was
Detroit Y. M. C. A. on "The Y. M. C. not raised more than 20 per cent, and
A. Secretaryship as a Life Work". Dr. at the present time the student is ad-
Studer showed the strength and so- mitted to all out-of-door events at a
lidarity of the Y. M. C. A. with cost of approximately 30 cents each.
branches all over the world and the The undesirability of adding the ex-
oportunities it offered for service. He tra charge to the tuition fee was
stated that the great educational, so- shown by the fact that the gymna-
sial, and athletic program was only slum cannot accommodate all of the
secondary to the dominant policy of students of the University. The plan
building Christian character. this year will mean that only those
The afternoon sessions opened at who are interested in basketball will
1:30 o'clock with the talk by Dr. C. be obliged to pay the additional ex-
M. McConnell, secretary of home pense which has been allowed.
missions and church extension for Sale Starts Tuesday
the Methodist church, on "College Men The sale of the tickets will start
and the Country Church". He said Tuesday. Tickets have been arranged
that the country church problem in two groups of six eacht each group
would not be solved by means of to cost $2. Until Friday a student
equipment and plans but that it was may obtain but one group of tickets,
a problem of personnel. He pointed upon the presentation of coupon 24
out that the social problems of this from his athletic book, and payment
day and age cannot be solved unless of the price set. After Friday a stu-
(Continued on Page Ten) dent may buy both groups of tickets,

JETTER AND DE FRIES FIND
RIGHT ADVERTISING PAYS..
Does it pay to advertise
through the right channels? The
following incident may throw
some light on this question.
Jetter and DeFries, Ann Ar-,
bor agents for the United Cigar
Stores company, received a ship-
ment of pipes, last month. In
The Daily for Nov. 17, they in-
serted a seven inch, three column
advertisement announcing a sale
of Prince of Wales pipes "at $1
while they last." This was the
only advertising done by this
store to sell the pipes. One
thousand, seven hundred and
eighty-five pipes were sold in a
single day after the advertise-
ment appeared.
Now $1,785 in trade as returns
on a $7.35 "ad" is exceptional,
even in the best of advertising
mediums; but if The Daily can
produce such results in excep-
tional instances, it must be a
fact that The Dailytbringstits ad-
vertising to the attention of the
buyer, which is the highest rec-
ommendation for advertising of
any variety.
or may purchase the group of his see-
ond preference.
DIand To Play At1
Faculty Concert
Mass singing accompanied by the
Varsity band will be a feature of the
concert on the Faculty series at 4:15
o'clock this afternoon in Hill audi-
torium. The band, led by Capt. Wil-
fred Wilson, of the School of Music
faculty, has planned two groups of
numbers, between which George Os-
car Bowen, head of the voice depart-
ment, will lead singing by the audi-
ence.

CAPPON, ONLY OTHER WOLVERMNE
PLAYER TO PLACE, MAKES
THIRD SQUAD
CRITIC GIVES THREE
IOWANS FIRST CHOICE
Wallace of Ames Granted Pivot Posi-
tion; A. Devine Selected as
Captain
Vick and Cappon represent Michi-
gan on the mythical All-Western elev-
ens which have been chosen by Wal-
ter Eckersall, recognized leading
sport writer of the Middle West. Neith-
er of the Maize and Blue stars were
named on the first team, Vick placing
on the second eleven, and Cappon be-
ing mentioned on the third.
Wallace, of Ames, at Center
Contrary to the expectations and
hopes of the Michigan fans, Vick was-
not among those who were named on
the first team. The position of cen
ter was granted to Wallace of Ames,
who was named by Eckersall last year
for the honor. His all around play-
ing and consistent offensive and de,
fensive work again earned him the
position. However, Vick's first in the
Conference choices gave him an easy
second and he was named for the
berth on the second eleven.
Cappon, who was named on the
second All-Conference elevn, was
granted a birth on the third All-West-
ern, Mohardt, of Notre Dame, being
ranked above both him and Peden, Il-
linois. The choice of Cappon in both
of the selections speaks well for the
Maize and Blue gridder, who filled two
berths In the Michigan machine dur-
ing the past season.
Iowa Places Three on First Team
Iowa placed the most men on the
All-Western eleven. Slater, Locke
and A. Devine were chosen, the lat-
ter bing named as captain. Notre
Dame was the second school in hon-
ors, two of the Catholics being chos-
en. No other university placed more
than one man.
The choices in the second and third
elevens were scattered among nearly
all of the schools in the Middle West.
Chicago was favored with three and
Ohio State with two,. in addition to
their men who were named on the
first team. The University of Detroit
was represented by Ellis on, the first
team, Laer on the second, and Mc-
Namara on the third.
Wabash, Missouri, St. Xayiers and
Kansas Aggies 'were the other schools
not in the Conference which placed
men on one of the three elevens.
JUDGE HOFFMAN ADDRESSES
WESLEYAN GUID TONIGHT
Judge Charles W. Hoffman, of the
Cincinnati court of domestic relations,
will give the. third of the Wesleyan
Guild lectures at 7:30 o'clock tonight
in the Methodist church, on 'Children
and the Law."

"Is Michigan democratic?" Chimes
Writers Offer Varying Opinions

"Is Michigan Democratic?" Christ-
mas Chimes, which will appear on the j
campus this week, presents both sides1
of the question in the first controver-
sial article of the year. Leo J. Hersh-
dorfer, '23, declares emphatically that
the University is democratic, while
Maynard Newton, '22, takes the oppo-
site side, attempting to show that
Michigan is undemocratic..
The fifteenth annual Michigan Union
Opera, "Make It for Two", is featured
in the magazine. "The Cast-The
Chorus-The Committee", is a story
about the opera written by Marion B.
Stahl, '23,'chairman of the publicity
committee. E. Mortimer Shuter, direct-
or of the opera, is the subject of this
month's frontispiece, which is the
third of a series done by James
House, Jr., '23, Chimes art editor. A
double page spread of pictures
of the opera especially taken for
Chimes completes the opera features.
Fred C. Kelly Contributes
Fred C. Kelly, who was a student
in the University during the years
1901 and 1902, and is now a contrib-
uter to American, Cosmopolitan, Les-
lie's and many other publications,
brings to the Michigan campus a
story with a purpose in his, "College
Thoughts After Twenty Years".
This month the prize winner in

The story, "A Fool There Was", was
written by Katharine Cooley Baker, ai
special student in the School of Mu-
sic.
Professor Vibbert Writes
Just what the American university
unions are and what they are doing
and have done is explained by Prof.
Charles B. Vibbert in "The American
University Unions in Europe".
"The Land of Liniment and Band-
ages', by Hughston M. McBain, '23,
is an expose of the innermost secrets
of Billy Fallon, assistant Varsity
trainer.
Morris C. Robinson, president of the
Monteith club, tells about the organi-
zation in his article, "Michigan - A
School for Ministers".
"The Man Who Understood Wom-
en", is the second of a series of mod-
ern novelettes written by Hardy Hoov-
er, '23, for Chimes.
Pennsylvania Club Elects Officers
Officers of the Pennsylvania club for
the present year have been elected as
follows: President, T. A. Gross, '21E;
vice-president, W. L. Newberry, '23E;
secretary, Martha C. Sheppard, '22;
treasurer, P. N. Young, '24. A meet-
ing of all Pennsylvania students on
the campus has been called for 7:30
o'clock Wednesday evening, in the

,

I

i

JUNIOR ENGINEERS TO
PAY DUES TUESDAY

r

Junior engineers will make a
special effort to collect all class
dues Tuesday. Tables will be set
up in all parts of the Engineer-
ing building and collections will
be made during tIf entire day.
Officers of the class are anxious
to have all members of the class
paid up.

The Westinghouse
vented in 1869.

air brake was in-

Walter Eckersall 's All - Western Football Teams
POSITION FIRST ELEVEN SECOND TEAM THIRD ELEVEN
RIGHT EtND ...........Crisler, Chicago ................... Swanson, Nebraska ................Belding, Iowa.
RIGHT TACKLE .......Ellis, Detroit .......................McGuire, Chicago ..................Brader, Wisconsin,
RIGHT GUARD .........Trott, Ohio State . ..... Redmon, Chicago ...................McNamara, Detroit.
CENTER ...............Wallace, Ames .....................VICK, MICHIGAN . ........Bunge, Wisconsin.
LEFT GUARD ..........Pucelik, Nebraska.................H. Anderson, Notre Dame............Hahn, Kansas Aggies.
LEFT TACKLE .........Slater, Iowa ........................Huffman, Ohio State ...............Milstead, Wabash.
LEFT END.............E. Anderson, Notre Dame ...........Myers, Ohio State (captain) .........Higgins, Ames.
QUARTER BACK......A. Devine, Iowa, (captain) ..........Romney, Chicago .............. . Lewis, Missouri (captain).
LEFT HALF BACK ....Mohardt, Notre Dame ..............Peden, Illinois ......................CAPPON, MICHIGAN.
RIGHT HALF BACK ....Elliott, Wisconsin ................Noble, Nebraska ...................Davis, St. Xaviers.
FUL BACK ...........Locke, Iowa .......................Lauer, Detroit ....................LincolnMissouri.
(These choices are an All-Middle West selection, no attempt being made to rate the nlav-

II

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