100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

December 01, 1921 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-12-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

_.

. ..,.

whop Sucy
CHINESE AND
AMERICAN RESTAURANT
uang Tung Lo.
613 E. Liberty

Tau Sigma Delta Initiates
Elections have been announced of
eight members of the junior and
senior classes of the College of Ar-
chitecture to Tau Sigma- Delta, inter-
national honorary fraternity in archi-
tectural and the allied arts.
Those elected are: Ralph R. Calder,
Spec. A, Ralph W. Demmon, '23A, Earl
T. Durbin, '22A, Catherine B. Heller,
'23A, S. Marius Houkom, Special A,
S. L. Owens, '22A, W. K. Rindge, and
Archie L. Striegl, '23A.

MAKES NEW RULES

Millions

of

People

Economy and Greater Efficiency
Sought: "Open Shop" May
Be Recognized

AreI

Can Write

I

vercoats

-.-

Overcoats

!itf or

lL

"; i u

-, , I

PERMANENT STABILITY IS
AIM OF SWEEPING CHANGES
(By Associated Press)
Chicago, Nov. 30.-Economies In
operation and increased efficiency,
estimated to reach $50,000,000 a year.
and recognition of the "open shop" on
all American railroads were fore-
cast tonight in the promulgation of re-
vised working rules governing rail-
road shop employes by the United
States Railroad Labor board.
The new rules become effective
Dec. 1, and take jurisdiction over ap-
proimately 400,000 men immediately,
although a still larger number will be
affected when the normal traffic con-
ditions are restored.
Supplant National Agreement
Far reaching changes in the rules,
which supplant the national agree-
ment made during federal control,
were designed to afford a basis for
permanent stability in the railroad
shops of the country and were de-
clared by members of the Labor board
to be the most important work yet
done by the board and of much great-
er significance than any decision in
the past, even including wage scale
adjustments.
Large economies are expected to re-
sult from revision of the clasisfica-
tion rules, which were made more
elastic, and hereafter will permit
members of certain crafts to do minor
fobs previously done by members of
other ,crafts. Statisticians attached
to the Labor board estimated that
economies in operation, increased ef-
ficiency and larger output, would ap-
proximate $50,000,000 a year.
Provision for Minorities
Provision for the representation of
minorities who may have grievances
is another important item of thenew
rules. Under the national agreement,
negotiation for employes was placed
almost wholly in the hands of labor
oranizations, with the result that the
railroads and many industrial and
civic institutions declared that the
agreement forced a closed union shop
on the roads. Non-union men found
it impracticable to attempt to bring
their grievances before the board and
as the rules worked out, union officials
handled the cases, taking their pre-
cedent from the national agreement
negotiations in which union officials
acted for the employes in drawing up
the agreement under federal control.
DAY PRESIDES AT MEETING
OF ALL CONFERENCE ALUMNI
New Organization To Be Governed
By Ten Representatives of
Universities
Former Federal Judge William Day,
of Michigan, was toastmaster and
master of ceremonies at the first an-
nual meeting of alumni of Western
Conference colleges, at the University
club Monday evening, Oct. 17 in Cleve-
land. More than 300 of the 3,000
alumni in Cleveland and northeastern
Ohio attended.
Mayor William S. Fitzgerald, Wash-
ington University; W. D. Cole, '12L,
of Michigan; William B. Woods, Ohio
State, director of law of Cleveland;
John Cunnigham, Ohio State, editor
of the Ohio Farmer; E. B. Pierce, gen-
eral secretary of the Minnesota alum-
ni; T. F. McDonald, Iowa, of the
Guardian Trust company and others
spoke.
P. G. Kassulker, Chicago, Oscar C,
Bell, Illinois, Joe Fogg, Wisconsin,
Bert Baston, Minnesota, and "Hi"
Cole, Michigan were among the foot-
ball players who attended.
During the meeting a permanent
association to be known as the "West-
ern Conference University Association

of Cleveland" was organized. It will
be administered by a board of ten gov-
ernors, one appointed by each local
alumni association.
Pay your Daily subscription at the
Press Bldg.-Adv.
Don't forget to pay your Daily sub-
scription.-Adv.

Stories and

I

THIS IS THE STARTLING ASSERTION RECENTLY MADE BY ONE OF THE
HIGHEST PAID WRITERS IN THE WORLD. IS HIS ASTOUNDING STATE-
MENT TRUE? CAN IT BE POSSIBLE THERE ARE COUNTLESS THOUS-
ANDS OF PEOPLE YEARNING TO WRITE, WHO REALLY CAN AND SIM-
PLY HAVEN'T FOUND IT OUT?
Most anybody can tell a story. Why can't most anybody
write one? Don't you believe the creator gave you a story-
writing faculty just as he did the greater writer?

Photoplays

Now Is

Your Opportunity!
IN COLD will be
given as Prizes

$7 500

in the Scenario Contest which is now being conducted by the
"Michigan Daily"

RULES OF CONTEST

1. All manuscripts must be typewritten on white
8% x 11 inch paper. Original copies, not carbons,
must be submitted.
2. Manuscripts should average 1,500 words in
length. This is a suggestion, but not essential.
3. The writer's name and address must be on the
upper left hand corner of the first page of the man-
uscript.
4. Manuscripts not accepted will be returned only
if self-addressed and stamped envelopes are en-
closed.
5. Manuscripts will be judged by competent
judged picked by The Daily and the producers.
6. Two prizes will be awarded, the first of $50
and the second of $25.
7. Manuscripts should be addressed to The Daily
in care of the scenario editor.,
8. The contest closes at 6 o'clock Saturday night,
Dec. 3, 1921.

A FEW SUGGESTIONS
1. A scenario is the description of the action of
a story in its proper order, but not necessarily di-
vided into scenes of giving the detailed action.
2. Don't forget that the heart and soul of the
scenario is its story. That is the great thing, the
essential thing, and the all important thing about
the scenario. If the story is a fascinating thing of
heart-interest,.clean romance, adventure or mystery,
then your scenaro is good at heart.
3. Stories of a dramatic type are desired. Drama
makes a more definite appeal and is easier to por-
tray than comedy or farcial comedy.
4. Avoid "slap-stick" and gross comedy situations.
5. Avoid sex themes or situations developed on
the worn-out subject of the "eternal triangle."
6. Remember that language cannot be photo-
graphed, therefore avoid lengthy description. The
story must be one of action, one which may be vis-
ualized.
7. Portray your characters concisely and at all
times be consistent in the development of your
theme.
8. It is suggested that the story be based on
some plot which revolves around the University.

ifU ~

and Don 't Know It!

Remember this contest is open to all students of the Univer-
sity with the exceptions of the "Michigan Daily" Editorial
and Business Staffs.
NOTE:-Any students who are considering submitting scenarios and who desire any further infor-
mation can interview the producing company's representative at the publications reading room, second
floor of the Press Building, from 2 to 4 o'clock any day except Saturday.

.1
5

Just returned from the market with the finest line of overcoats
Ann Arbor has ever seen. If you want to get a real overcoat
the time is NOW. The PLACE is at CORBETT'S where
you always get your money's worth and then some.
If you buy one of our Fitform Overcoats you get a real Coat
at the right price. Come down to Corbett's on Liberty where
all the young men come.

One of the adbantages
of superior management

0

WOOL HOSE AT A BIG SAVING

Tom

Corbett

Michigan prices could legiti-
mately be higher than others.
They're really much l ower

116 EAST LIBERTY STREET
Where Fitform' Clothes are Sold

The Ichigan Cafeteria
is at 62 E. Liberty St.

_ I_ ..............

DANCES FRIDAY. AND SATURDAY
Tickets at Graham's Slater's and Wahr's uptown
Fischer Drug Co. and Goodyear Drug Co. downtown

IIIifIIIIIII11lIIIIIIliiilitlllllltiiiiiiiillililltliltlitlltiiiliUl!llUltlllltittliilliltlliHi1111111111111111111111

.

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan