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December 01, 1921 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-12-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

_. r.,

SiES iN

II

PROSPECTS FOR BANNER YEAR
SEEM BRIGHT AS COLD
APPROACHES
Prospects of a banner season in
hockey at Michigan this year are very
bright. Negotiationstare under way to
reserve the coliseum for a few hours
every day, so that the squad may be
able to practice intensively. Practice
will not start until theadvent of cold
weather and the length of the practice
season is therefore undetermined.
The schedule of games has not been
fully arranged at present, but negotia-
tions with the Michigan School of
Mines, Carnegie Tech., Notre . Dame,
and the University of Detroit are un-
der way. It Is also rumored that a
Western Conference hockey meet may
be held in Chicago this season. If this
takes place Michigan will be a strong
contender for the Conference cham-
pionship.
I'roty men have signified their in-
tention of trying out for the team.
Among those who have expressed their
willingness to tryout are Steketee anq
Wilson of football fame. Many others
of ability in addition to players on the
last year's squad will also report.
The defence of last year's team is
practically intact for the present sea-
son. The forwards position, however,
gV sygergd th1 os o anuonp Rye
gad lIoIking.

tiger and bear shooting expedition.
The prince also will be given an
opportunity to hunt tigers in the pre-
serves at Gaalior, where Premier
Clemenceau, of France, went on his
hunting expedition several month ago.
This section is famed as one of the
most certain haunts of the tiger in
India. There the prince will be accom-
panied by the Maharaja of Sindhia, who
rendered great service to, the Allies
in the war. '
AMERICAN WAYS
BOTHER ENGLISH
WOMEN ATHLETES

AILGER SPEAKS BEFORE
FRESHMAN ENGINEERS

American ways and American meth-
ods and especially the large scale on
which everything is carried on in this
country in contrast to the English
customs, are causes of much bewilder-
ment to Miss Catherine Gaskell and
Miss Helen Arnfield, the two mem-
bers of the English women's cham-
pion hockey team who were recently
guests of elen Newberry residence.
Miss Arnfield and Miss Gaskell, who
have been making an extended trip
through the East and Middle-West,
came to this cuntry earlier in the
fall with the champion women's hock-
ey team of England, which played 15
games with American women's teams
throughout the East. The English
women won every gaane they played,
and througioit the entire season were
scored on only 10 times, The remain-
ing members of the team have re-
turned to England, but Miss Arnfleld
and Miss Gaskell have been visiting
various colleges and cities of the
Middle-West, being interested espe-
cally AIn the American methods of
physical education for women,
They are both typical English
wolnen athletes, and their explana-
tionA in regard to the organization of
women's athletics were of interest. In
England women do not participate in
athletic events to any extent until
after they are out of collegq, nd for
this reason the wnmen who form the
teams of the English women's na-
tional sport, hockey, are somewhat
more mature than the members of the
American teams.
Miss Arnfield and Miss Gaskell
spoke to the girls at Helen Newberry
residence, telling of the life, customs,
and traditions of college women in
England. One interesting fact was
mentioned that in English colleges
women are not granted degrees as the

TELLS HISTORY OF CONFERENCE
ATHLETICS AT ASSEMBLY
OF '25 MEN
Prof. R. W. Aigler, of the law fac-
ulty, spoke to the freshman engineers
in their regular weekly assembly yes-
terday morning, telling of the work-,
ings of the athletic board, the origin
of the Conference, and many other in-
teresting facts about our athletic de-
partment.
In the beginning, according to Pro-
fessor Aigler, the Conference consist-
ed of three teams, Michigan, Chicago,
and Minnesota. The other teams of the1
present Conference were slated as seceI
ond rate teams, unqualified to play the;
others,
Where the Money Goes
Professor Aigler then told what be-
comes of the money taken in at the
various athletic events. Fifty per
cent of all gate receipts must be paid
the visiting team and the remaining
money is used in paying for the up-
keep and building additions to Ferry
field and in purchasing equipment for
the teams. It is an accepted fact that
football is the only paying branch of
athletics, and consequently the pro-
ceeds from the games have to help
support such sports as tennis, basket-
ball, and others.
The Michigan athletic plant is the
largest in the country, according to
Professor Aigler, as it comprises 40
acres. A few years ago the gridiron
was dug out to the depth of three feet,
tiled, cindered and graveled and again
covered with earth, making it possible
to play on it in weather such as was
experience in the last Conference
game.
Comments on Yost
In commenting on the Yost contro-
versy, Professor Aigler said that three
years ago he had attended a meeting

alumni in Detroit at which a unanim-
ous vote had been passed to retain
and support Fielding H. Yost as Mich-
igan's coach. Also, at a meeting held
last year in the Union a similar, un-
animous resolution was passed, he
said.
Ohio After Game
With California
(By Associated Press)
Ohio has made overtures for a game
with California the latter part of Oc-
tober to be played in Ohio's new
$1,300,000 stadium, which will seat
63,000 persons, but the negotiations
have not reached the stage of cer-
tainty. The Ohio eleven is booked to
appear at Illinois and Minnesota next.
fall, while the Michigan and Chicago
games probaly will be scheduled for
the Ohio State stadium.
L. W. St. John, director of athletics
at Ohio, believes it is better for Ohio
to confine itself to competition within
the Western Conference, aside from
the usual preliminary games, rather
than to play a team in the East. "We
are playing our natural opponents
now," said Director St. John.
Coach Zuppke, at Illinois, is expect-
ed to continue his curtailed schedule
of but five Conference games. The Il-
lini mentor formerly played a hard
six-game schedule, but this year
broke the long grind by a game with
DePauw between the Michigan and
Chicago contests. There is still talk
in Urbana of a game with Harvard,
but George Huff, director of athletics,
has steadfastly refused to play a team
in the East unless that team would
agree to a return game on Illinois field
the following year. Illinois will play
Chicago here next season and will al-
so play several other regulars on
their home gridirons, including Wis-
consin at Madison and Michigan at
Ann Arbor. Iowa and Ohio State will

the quintet of the games.
The schedules of all Conference
teams will be limited to seven games,
as in the past. This program usually
includes two practice gamesuwith
smaller colleges.
ADELPHI hEARS CHINESE
PHASE OF DISARMAMENT
Feng C. Ling, Grad., Chinese stu-
dent, spoke before the members of the
Adelphi- Debating society Tuesday
night on the subject of the disarma-
ment conference. He spoke from the
standpoint of China, representing it
as a weak nation requiring the protec-
tion of stronger nations.
The other number on the society's
program was a debate on the proposi-
tion, "The United States Shall Cancel
the Interest on All War Debts." The
affirmative was voted as having won
the issue.
Coach Rickey began baseball prac-
tice the middle of February in 1911
with 15 hurlers in Waterman gymnas-
ium.

I

of the athletic board and prominent

Mrs. Katherine B. Pomeroy, '94
Chicago, national treasurer of the
erican Association of University
men, spoke to the girls of Martha (
dormitory Tuesday evening conc
ing the work that the Michigan Al
nae association is doing for the be:
of the Women's building. She ga,
short history of the asociation and
of the work it did. "We must have
co-operation of the student body in
der to help the new building projE
she stated.
TYPEWRITERS
FOR SALE OR RENT
HAMILTON BUSINESS 01
STATE AND WILLIAM STREE
SLEEP ANYWHERE, BUT
EAT AT REX'S
THE CLUB LUNCH
712 Arbor Street
Near State and Packard Street

probably play at Urbana to round out 1 MRS.

is

AT MARTHA 00

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.
- --i.

'

PRINCE F WALES ON
TOUR THROUGH INDIW
(By Associated Press)
London, Nov. 30. -- Shooting and
hunting expeditions will vary the'
round of festivities and receptions ar-
ranged for the entertainment of the
Prince of Wales on his tour through
the Indign x11pire Aow in progress.
Early In December he is expected
to arrive at Bharatpur, where he will
be given an opportunity to do some
duck shooting.
Four days will be spent in hunting
in the Nepal Terai,. where there i3
expected to, be excellent short In
shooting tigers, the rhinocerbs, and.
other big game. There the prince
will have as, a companion the prime
minister, Maharaja Sir Shamsher
Jung, who is a keen sportsman and
who in 1911 entertained King.George.
One of the most interesting of the
In4ian ggtabl@ยง whg will entertain
the prince to the famous woman rul-
er who bears the title of the Begum
of Bhopal, the onlywoman ruler, in
India.
The Begum may not eat in public
but, at the state banquet, sho will ap-
pear and make a speech welcoming
the prince. She has a good command
of inglish. Part of the program that
she has arranged for the prince is a

nlibttg ftoges-tifilts

,-

L I

I.

.

men are, but receive simply
cate stating that they have
ed the course.

a certifi-
complet-

TRYOUTS FOR TRACK MAN-
AGER WANTED
Sophomores wishing to try out
for track manager should report
to Larry Snell at Waterman gym-
nasium between 3 to 5 Tuesday
and Wednesday afternoons.

That Christmas Gift
Why not send
anBox
or Fancy Basket?
Packed to suit your individual taste from our complete
assortment of fresh candies. We will wrap and mail the
gift for you. Come in today and make your selection.
709 N. UNIVERSITY

Handkerchiefs in a Large Assortment
of Linens and Silks

Initials, Fancy and Plain Linens
Plain and Fancy Silks

4

10 cts. to $2.00 each.
A MOST USEFUL GIFT

L

0
Tinker& Company

Distinctive Christmas Gifts
for Everyone
Greeting Cards, Pottery. Narcissus Bulbs, Games, Toys, Stationery,
Novelties, Incense Burners, Incense, Ribbon Novelties, Vanities, and
lqur erable other articles that are Differe'nt. REAL MISTLETOE.
THE WISTERIA SHOP
330 Maynard Street
Open Every Evening

-80. STATE ST. AT WILLIM ST.

ij

I

7.7.

m

a

a

NOMA

THIS g THIS
COLUMN L A COLUMN
CLOSES CLOSES
AT 3 P,, ADVERTISING AT 3 PM,

,

lU

WANTED

WANTED-Eat as mucl as you want,
of what you want, when you want it,
for $5.00 to $6.00 a week. We have
over 50 students eating 3 meals a,
day on less than $5.50 a week. Menu
changed 3 times every day-soup,
choice of 4 meats, bread and butter,
potatoes, drinks, dessert, 35c. We
deliver anything to eat until 11:00 P.
m. Ham's Lunch, 538 Forest. 1526-M.
t ' 65-3
W TED-Manufacturer wants local
reresentatives, staple product,
splendid proposition. See Mr. S.
Opok, St. James Hotel. Room 27.
WANTED- Situation. AfIrst class
fraternity cook will be disengaged
- Jan. 1st. Address Box H. S. C., Daily
office. 67-3
WANTED -A student tutor in Astron-
omy 3E. Call Olson, 1694-M. 5?
FOB SALE
FOR SALE-Full Dress Suit. Prac-
tically new, at half price. Size 37.
phone 1170-J. 5-

FOR RENT
FOR {.ENT - Share in large front
suite, steam heat, two double desks.
Phone 1194-M. 422 East Washing-
ton. 57-4
FOR RENT .- Pleasant double1and
single room near Campus. 1115 So.
University. 57
LONT
LOST-Pearl necklace between Pack-
ard St. and West Hall. Cal 2663-J.
Reward, 57-21
MISCELLANEOUS
THERE ARE a few vacant first places
at Failing's DiningRooms now. If
you are looking for one, here is a
good place for good home cooking.
714 Monroe St. 56-3
SPANISH STUDENTS-Specialtutor-,
acquainted with both Spanish and
English languages. Price Reason-
able. Call Armijo, 2499. 614 Mon-
roe St. 55-21
STUDENTS' NOTICE - Commenc-
this week we are reducing our laun-
dry prices. No calls or deliveries I
'made. Phone 2569, 110 N. Ingalls.

Il

Iss'

'oq

THE FOLLOWING MERCHANTS HAVE AN ABUNDANT SUPPLY OF
DAY, WEAR IT, AND GET YOUR CLASSMEN TO WEAR'

THEM.
THEIRS,'

GET YOURS
TOO.

TO-

N. F. ALLEN CO.
LUTZ CLOTHING CO.
REULE, CONLIN, FIEGEL
LINDENSCHMITT, APFEL & CO.
WAGNER & CO.
TOM CORBETT
GEO. KYER

TINKER & CO.
WADHAMS & CO.
J. F. WUERTH CO.
VAN BOVEN & CRESS
DAVIS TOGGERY SHOP
WILD & CO.
GEO. MOE

i

Do your part to revive this'Michigan Tr adition. Your class officers and Studeni
Councilmen are wearing toques. Get yours

"Not Fifth 9benue--Jut--the Campus Diagonal"

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