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December 01, 1921 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-12-01

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THE WEATHER
UNSETTLED AND WARMER
TODAY

4it OE.

4:Datt

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIM
SERVICE

VOL. XXXII. No. 57 -

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, 1921

PRICE FIVE

EXPERTS FAIL TO
HEACH ACCORD ON
NAVAL REDUCTIONi

J". C. Plans
Holiday

extra
Service

TURN PROBLEM BACK TO
CONFERENCE DELE.
GATES

ARMS

SHIPS NOW BUILDING
ARE POINT AT ISSUE
American Representatives Determinn
ed on "Five-Five-Three"
Ratio
(By Associated Press)
Washington, Nov. 30.-Experts of th
"big three" naval powers agreed today
that they could not reach an accord
on calculations to reduce after meas-
uring Japan's existing relative naval
strength. They gave up the task and
turned the problem back to their re-
spective delegations to the arms con-
ference. Upon its solution hangs the
fundamental principles of the Ameri-
can naval limitation proposal, the
"five-five-three" capital ships ratio.
The experts were especially in
agreement as to the accuracy of the
estimate of the naval strength of each
power originally submitted by Amer-
ican conference group in the American
plan for including all ships actual-
ly under construction in arriving at
the ratio as followed. The Japanese
experts, however, insisted that this
was 'not the proper basis of calcula-
tion, proposing instead to disregard
all ships now building by either power
In determining relative naval strength.
The plenary delegates of the two
powers will continue the discussion on
this point, eliminated by such points
as the studies of the experts have been
able to-throw on the technical ques-
tions involved.
Firm determination of the American
delegation to insist on a five-five-three
ratio of ship building in any estimate
of naval strength was reiterated to-
night by authorities. The purpose of
the Japanese delegation was not dis-
closed.
DISCUSS LOCATION FOR
NEW LEAGUE BUILING
Consideration of a site for the
Womens' Building was the principal
subject discussed yesterday after-
noon when the executive committee
and advisory members met with the
board of directors of the Women's
league.-
Three factors are being considered
in deciding upon a location. It must
be accessible from all centers of
women's actiyities on the campus,
there must'be room for growth with
the University, and the location must
be in the line 'of development of other
women's buildings such as new dor-
mitories and a gymnasium.
The executive committee and ad-
visory members held an adjourned
meeting last night to make plans for
the meeting of the Alumnae council
in January.
SIGMA DELTA CHI WILL
DISCUSS WORK OF BUREAU
Sigma Delta Chi, professional jour-
nalistic fraternity, will hold a special
meeting at 4 o'clock Sunday afternoon
at the Union for the purpose of dis-
cussing the work of the Michigan
News bureau, which the fraternity is
fostering, and for the purpose of plan-
ning further Work for the society for
the coming year. Reports at a meet-
ing of the fraternity last night show-
ed that the bureau has done consider-
able work in furnishing the papers in
the middle West with news of the Un-
iversity campus.

Special cars to all main points in
the East and Middle West and a com-
plete special train to Chicago will be
provided by the Michigan Central
railroad to accommodate the hun-
dreds of students that will be leaving
Ann Arbor on Friday, Dec. 16, for the
Christmas vacation.
Students who wish to secure space
on any of the trains leaving the sta-
tion Friday were warned yesterday
by A. J. Wiselogel, station master fo
the Michigan Central, that reserva-
tions must be made before the end
of the week if the crowd of students
leaving on that date is to be han-
dled.
GREELEY TALKS ON
FORESTRY SERVICE
Stresses Need of Trained Hen in
Address Before Local
Organization

OPERA IMUSIC TO
BID FOH HONOHS
Songs, Aided by Striking Effects in
Costumes, Give Promise of
Success
PREDICT "GARDEN OF GIRLS"
WILL MAKE STRONG APPEAL
Musical numbers of "Make It For
Two" will bid for honors even against
the dancing and plot of this year's
Union opera, if the rehearsal five days
before the opening at the Whitney
theater may be taken as a criterion.
While in other years dance steps may
have made the hit of the show, the,
musical numbers, solos and chorus
groups supported by extraordinary
costuming, staging and lighting ef-
fects, are expected to go over better
than in any previous production.
"Make It For Two" is a typical mus-
ical comedy. The concensus of opln-
ion among cast and chorus last night
was that "Garden of Girls" sung by
Arthur Holden, '24, male lead, would,
be the hit of the show. As to the oth-
er numbers, there was a wide vari-
ance of opinion which showed that all
the numbers must be of equal merit.

EMPHASIZES POSSIBILITIES
OF GREAT AMERICAN FORESTS
Need of technically trained men in
forestry was emphasized by William
B. Greeley, head of the United States
Forestry service, in his address to the
Forestry club last evening in the
Natural Science building. Prof. Filb
bert Roth, of the forestry department,
in introducing the speaker, stressed
the fact that Mr. Greeley controlled
a forest area greater than that reg-
ulated by any other man in the
world.
"The Forestry service must have
,men whose brains have been limbered
up by college training," said Mr. Gree-
ley. "We need young men with punch
and pep to keep up the zest and spirit
of our department." He then outlin-
ed the ideals and purposes of the
foresters, showing the great economic
and social responsibilities that are
placed upon them. Mr. Greeley point-
ed out how the- industries of Michi-
gan were very largely center d in the
southern section of the state, while
the northern areas, formerly the great
centers- of the logging industry, are
being left great deserts.
(Continued on Page Eight)
COACH YOST GOING ONL
10-DAY SPEAKING TRIP
ITINERARY INCLUDES CHICAGO,
MILWAUKEE, AND MICHI-
GAN TOWNS
Coach Yost will leave this morning
on a speaking tour which will in-
clude Chicago, M-fwaukee and several
cities throughout the state. His en-
gagement& will end with a football
smoker for the Varsity squad on Dec.
10 in Detroit.
He is to speak at noon today to the
members of the two high school teams
of Saginaw at a banquet tendered by
the Saginaw Kiwanis club. At' 7
o'clock this evening he will be the
guest of honor at the Saginaw alumni
dinner at the Saginaw club.
Yost will speak on Dec. 2 to the five
high school teams of Milwaukee at a
combined Y. M. C. A. and alumni din-
ner. From there he will go to the
Conference meeting of coaches for the
purpose of making the 1922 schedules.
On Dec. 6 Yost will address a din-
ner in Kalamazoo given for the "all
letter" men of the high school, Kala-
mazoo college and Kalamazoo Nor-
mal.
On Dec. 8, 9, and 10 the coach will
address football banquets held in
Benton Harbor, Holland, and Muske-
gon, while on Dec. 10 he is to speak
at the Detroit smoker.

Has
"Garden of
number and
tumes of the
this number.
in the show,
choruses and
numbers.

Best Costumes
Girls" is the show girl
probably the best cos-
opera will be shown in
There are nine songs
but with the opening
dances there will be 16

"Girls of the Seasons" sung by
Holden, assitsed by Howard Welch,
'24, Robert Winslow, '23D, Earl Pow-
ers, '22, and Gordon Loud, '22, will
depict the four seasons. The seasons
are all "girls" parts with unusually
elaborate costumes and a clever dance.
Give Local Touch
In "What Is a Girl to Do" there are
strains of "The Victors" which gives
a touch of local color to the show.
Earl Powers, '22, is the center of in-
terest as a "girl" and sings the song,
assisted by a men's chorus. "I'd Like
To Steal Away to Loveland," is the
title of the song to- be sung by Holden
and Donahue; male and female leads,
respectively.
"They Found Me" is sung by James
Dresbach, '24, with the girls chorus.
Thomas Underwood, '22L, and Albert
F. Schirmer, '22E, old favorites, have
a duet "Naughty Eyes." Stanley
Hawkes, '22, as the comedian "Sin-
bad," sings "Lonesome Blues," while
Howard Stimpson, '22, the lawyer,
sings "Mr. Irwin Skinnem." The fin-
ale of the first act is "Somebody's
Lips" by Holden and the entire com-
pany.
PUBLIC SALE of OPERA
TICKETS BEGINS TODAY
WILL CONTINUE UNTIL FIRST
PRESENTATION OF SHOW
MONDAY NIGHT
Public sale of tickets for "Make It
for Two", the 1922 Union Opera, will
start today at the box office of the
Whitney theater and will continue un-
til the first presentation of the show
on Monday night, Dec. 5.
Tickets are selling fast, according
to the Union officials, an'd should be
secured at once. The prices for seats
are $2.50 for the main floor and boxes,
$2 for the first four rows of the bal-
cony, and $1.50 and $1 for the remain-
der of the house. No war tax is be-
ing charged.
Women of the University received
tickets yesterday in the order of prece-
dence. A box office sale was held at
Hill auditorium, where application
blanks were exchanged for seats.,
Blanks may still be secured for seats
in any house in which the Opera plays
during its Christmas tour by applying
at the Union.I

CLARK TO PRESENT
ABRAHA LINCOILN
Chicago Public Speaking Head Will
Read Drinkwaters Work
Tonight
HAS STRONG REPUTATION IN
DRAMATIC INTERPRETATION
Prof. S. H. Clark, head of the de-
partment of public speaking at the
University of Chicago, will read John
Drinkwater's play, "Abraham Lin-
coln", at 8 o'clock this evening in
Hill auditorium. He will appear un-
der the direction of the Oratorical as-
sociation.
Professor Clark has a wide range of
experience as.a dramatic reader, and
is widely sought in this country and
Canada for his interpretations. He is
also a dramatizer of the best of re-
cent books for public interpretations.
A short time ago he appeared at the
Illinois theater, Chicago, and read a
dramatization of "Main Street' before
a capacity crowd.
Starting as a lecturer in Queen's
university, Professor Clark served on
the faculties of Trinty and MacMas-
ters colleges. In 1890 he was select-
ed as the head of the public speak-
ing department at Chicago. He is the
author of numerous text books,
among them "Literary Interpreta-
tions", "Principles of Vocal Expres-
sion", and "Practical Public Speak-
ing".
The play which Professor Clark is
reading at his appearance tonight has
enjoyed great popularity wherever it
has been presented, and is considered
one of the best plays of the past few
years. It had a successful run in New
York city and Chicago, played in all
of the large cities, and is in the West
at the present time.
Mradge Kennedy
Approves Idea
Of Local M~vovie
Madge Kennedy, the motion picture
star who appeared in "Cornered" at
the Whitney theater last night, in an
interview yesterday expressed great
interest in the University movie
which The Daily is sponsoring and
which will be produced on the cam-
pus during the coming year.
"It is one of the most interesting
experiments in American college life
that I have ever met with," she said,
"especially as it shows a praise-
worthy interest and originality in
Michigan students. It presents a re-
markable opportunity to a group of
intelligent Americans to portray ac-
curately the scenes and situations
of their peculiar environment, that
must be badly distorted by the inter-
pretations of others.
"The average film of American col,
lege life is so heightened and exag-
gerated that the great mass of the
public, depending on the motion pic-
ture for much of its opinion, sees the
college youth as a hybrid hero, min-
gling pool room evenings with after-
noon runs for a touchdown from the
40 yard line.
"With the new project that Michi-
gan is fostering, a reasonable inter-
pretation of college life should at
least be presented, with almost un
limited possibilities for a production
of a high quality under the control of
intelligent and sympathetic directors."

Michigan Dames to Hold Bazaar Dec. 3
Are your Christmas gifts ready? If
not you are invited to attend the bazaar
to be given during the afternoon and
evening of Dec. 3 at Newberry halfun-
ler the auspices of the Michigan
Dames. Candy and cakes as well as
fancy work will be on sale at this
time. The proceeds will be given to
he Women's building fund.

APPROVES MICHIGAN BOOSTERS
AS ALL-CAMPUS ORGANIZATION
This year's chairman of the J-Hop
will be elected from the Junior lit-
erary class, according-to a ruling of
the Student council at its meeting
held last night at the Union. The ac-
tion in regard to the J-Hop was tak-
en because of the confusion which
arose between the Juniors of the Lit
school and those of the Engineering
college.
Lit Class Misses Turn
According to a previous decision of
the council two years ago, junior
classes of the University should have
the privilege of directing this class
function in rotation but due to the
fact that last year's hop was discon-
tinued, the Junor lit class missed its
turn. In its decision the council fol-
lowed the precedent of former years.
The council further stated that here-
after when any department misses its
year, it shall be allowed to choose the
chairman the following year.
Discuss Boosters' Constitution
A discussion of the constitution of
the University of Michigan Boosters
organization resulted in the accept-
ance of the constitution with one
amendment stating that the Boosters
should be subservient to the council
at all times and that there should be
a member of the Student council on
the board of direcors of the organiza-
tion.
The constitution as it stands permits
(Continued on Page Eight)

Student Council Follows Precedent
Decision Which Ends
Difficulty

in

Audience Enjoys
Veterans' Mrovie
More than 1,500 people helped the
service men's attempt to "Finish the
Reading Room" by seeing Viola- Dana
in "There Are No Villains" at Hill
auditorium last night. Kennedy's so-
ciety orchestra furnished music be-
ginning at 7:30 o'clock and lasting
throughout the evening. .
The audience evinced interest both
in the plot of the feature as well as
the intimate glimpses presented of
life on the Barbary coast, while the
Buster Keaton comedy brought a
round of laughter.
This is the second of a series of en-
tertainments presented by the Veter-
ans memorial committee to complete
the unfinished reading room.
LITS WILL NAME
1-HOP CHAIRMAN

22 FOTBALL MEN.
ARE PIGKED TO
GET 'M, AWARD
NUMBER IS LARGEST EVER GIV-
EN HERE AT ONE
TIME
SIXTEEN ARE ELIGIBLE
FOR SEASON OF 1922
Numerous Injuries Made Necessary
The Use of Many Men,
Says Yost
Twenty-two members of the 1921
Varsity football squad will be award-
ed the coveted "M" for their work on
the football field this past fall. This
is the largest number of letters that
has ever been given out at Michigan
in any one sport at one time.
In commenting on the large award,
Coach Yost made the following state-
ment, "Because of the large number
of injuries during the season, it was
necessary to play practically two full
teams. In justice to all the men who
were deserving of a letter, we have de-
cided to give out more "M's" than
usual.
Those who are the recipients of the
letter are:
Captain R. J. Dunne, '24L, Chicago,
Ill.; T. P. Bank, '23, Flint; F. C. Cap-
pon, '23E, Holland; L. B. Curran, '23E,
Louisville, Ky.; W. C. Dean, '22, Al-
-bion; P. G. Goebel, '23E, Grand Rap-
ids; J. E. Johns, '23E, Lansing; H. G.
Kipke, '24, Lansing; B. Kirk, '23, Ypsi-
lanti; R. T. Knode, '23, Baltimore, Md.;
S. E. Muirhead, '24, Detroit; L. E.
Neisch, '24, Detroit; C. C. Petro, '24L,
Elyria, 0.; D. F. Roby, '23, Holland;
J. G. Searle, '23P, Evanston, Ill.; F.
W. Steketee, '22, Grand Rapids; D.
Swan, '24E, Detroit; E. Usher, Jr.,
'22, Toledo, 0.; I. C. Uteritz, '23, Oak
Park; Ill.; W. J. Van Orden, '23, Ann
Arbor; H. A. Vick, '24M, Toledo, 0.; H.
E. Wilson, '22, Grand Rapids.
Of these 22 men, six will be lost to
the squad next fall. They are Dunne,
Dean, Usher, Steketee, Vick, and Wil-
son. The rest are eligible to play
again next season.
DR. STANLEY TO BE MARRIED
AT ELEVEN O'CLOCK TODAY
Dr. A. A. Stanley, former director
of the School of Music, and Miss Dora
Oestreicher, of this city, will be mar-
ried at 11 o'clock this morning at the
home of William -Koch, 309 Mosely
street.

Players Club Pleases Audience With
Clever Rendering of Sheridan 's Play

(By Lillian Scher)
Players club would have acquitted
itself very favorably before George
Washington had that honorable gen-
tleman attended either of its per-
formances of Sheridan's "School for
Scandal," the two past evenings at
Sarah Caswell Angell hall, for this
favorite comedy of his age decidedly
pleased even the 20th century audi-
ences that witnessed it.
The author picked out the suppos-
edly ultra-modern weaknesses, vanity,
love of gossip, and scandal, and en-
dow Lady Sneerwell, Mrs. Candour,
Sir Teazle and fall the rest of these
prim old ancesters with them, and it
remained for the actors to do the rest
--which they certainly did in their in-
terpretation of the parts at these per-
formances.
Joyce McCurdy, '22, as Lady Sneer-
well lived up to that rather different-
ly difficult role with clever skill at
all times. Catherine Greenough, '24,
and Harold B. Lipsitz, '22-Lady Tea-
zle and Sir Teazle respectively, furn-
ished considerable amusement by

playing the keen carried combatants
with splendid interpretation. Jack P.
Holden, '22, as Mr. Crabtree, Henry D.
Goff, '23, as Sir BenJa'min Backbite,
Edalaine Roden, '22, as Maria, and
Nayf Bashara, '23L, as Sir Oliver Sur-
face, also interpreted their parts with
considerable skill.
The settings, altT ough not elabor-
ate, were good, and barring a few
slips on details-such as an 18th cen-
tury lover reading his lyrics from a
20th century blue book-and the rath-
er slow action ,necessitated by the
nature of the play and the liimted
stage facilities, the performances as a
whole were 'indeed creditable.
The large audience was obviously
enthusiastic throughout the play,
which was presented under the di-
rection of Prof. R. D. T. Hollister, of
the public speaking department.
Catherine Coburn, of the School, of
Music, sang between acts Tuesday
night, while Mildred Case, '22, was the
soloist last night. The new Players
club orchestra also made its bow to
the public.

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