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November 30, 1921 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-11-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

HL M.

ICHIGAN DAILY

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OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY
OF MICHIGAN
Published every morning except Monday during the Univcr-
y year by the Board in Control of Student Publications.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use for
>nblication of all news dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
dited in this paper and the local news published therein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second

pSubscription by carrier or mail, $3.50.
Offices: Ann .Arbor Press building, Maynard Street.
Phones: Business, 960; Editorial, 2414.

r.._.. .

mmunications not to exceed 300 words, if signed, the ig-
not necessarily to appear in print, hut as an evidence of
ind notices of events will be published in The Daily at the
on of the Editor, if left at or mailed to The IDail office.
ed communications will receive no consideration. No man-
will be returned unless the writer incloses postage.
e Daily does not necessarily endorse the sentiments ex-
in the commqnications.

EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
MANAGING EDITOR .......... BREWSTER P. CAMPBELL
Assistant Managing Editor...............Hugh W. Hitchcock
City Editor............................... B. P. Lovejoy, Jr.
Night Editors-L
igtR. 4. Adams G. P. Overton
Edward Lambrecht M. B. 'Stahl
Hughston McBain Paul Watzel
Editorial Board Chairman.........................T. J. Whinery
Assistants-
S. T. Beach E. R. Meiss
L. A. Kern . Leo Hershdorfer
Sunday Magazine Editor.............Thornton W. Sargent, Jr.
Exchange Editor........................... .George E. Sloan
Nlusic Editor............. ............Sidney B. Coates
Sporting Edit',r ................ . . .............George Reindel
Women's Editor .......................EFlizabethi Vickery
Humor Editor .................................... E R. Meiss
Assistants
R. N. Byers L. L. Fenwick " B. H. Lee
W. B. Butler H. B. Grundy . E Mack
A. D. Clark Agnes lulinquist atrine Montgomery
Harry C. Clark H. E. Howlett R. C. Mioriarity
J P. Comstock Marion Kerr R. B. Tarr
tcohn P. Dawson L. S. Kerr 'Virginia T~o
.Donahue M. A. Klaver Dorothy ipple
W. F. lliott Marion Koch 14.L ost

r

J. B. Young
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
BUSINESS MANAGER ..........VERNON F. HILLERY
Advertising ..... ... .......F. M. Heath, A. J. Parker
Publication...........................Nathan W. Robertson
Accounts ................................. John J. Hamels, Jr.
Circulation .............................Heroid C. Hunt
Assistants
Burr L. Robbins Richard Cutting H. Willis Heidbreder'
W. Cooley James Prentiss W. Kenneth Galbraith
L. Beaumont Parks Maurice Moule J. A. Dryer
Walter Scherer M atrtinGoldring Richard Heidemann
Edw. Murane Tyler Stevens T. H. Wolfe
David Park Paul Blum
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 1921
Night Editor-R. E. ADAMS, JR.
Assistant--Harry Clark
Proofreaders-Leland Yost
Cecil R. Betron
There will be a meeting of the entire Daily edi-
torial stagf and all tryouts at 5 o'clock this aftenoon.
PLUS VALUE RECEIVED
Although we are constantly put to the test of sup-
porting worthy causes on the campus, we should not
become immune to the call for support whenever it
is asked. And again we have a call from a well-
qualified organization to a worthy cause.
In, our Michigan Union, as everybody knows,
there is an unfinished reading room; unfinished be-
cause heretofore funds have been lacking for its
completion. But now an.honest effort is being made
to raise the necessary funds, not by subscription, but
by giving full value for money received - not char-
ity, but support is asked. .
The "Veterans Memorial Committee", consisting
of the combined service organizations on the cam-
pus, is attempting to raise the money and finish the
reading room so that it may be dedicated to Michi-
gan heroes who died in the -war. By a series of
dances, movies, and similar productions, it is hoped
that the quota of fifteen thousand dollars will be
procured during the coming year. So far five hun-
dred dollars have been added to the budget by two
dances on one week-end - but that is only a start.
This evening at Hill auditorium the committee is
offering a moving picture production of the highest
class in an attempt to further this campaign. They
solicit our attendance, but it should not be neces-
sary to urge us to come, the movie will be well
worth the slight admission charge and satisfaction
is guaranteed.
So let us remember a cause, plus value received,
and show our support by forgetting other places of
amusement along with studies, and by being at Hill
auditorium tonight.

But in the case of such concerts as those by John
McCormack and Edward Rechlin, leaving during
the last few minutes of the concert is almost inex-
cusable. There is of course always the possibility
that an individual may have an engagement which
will not wait three minutes, but such cases are far
between. In very rare instances does one plan to
spend an evening at a concert and at the same time
have another engagement which necessitates leav-
ing two or three minutes before its close.
However, the most downright maddening phase
of this development was particularly noticeable in
both the concerts referred to, when people sat in
their seats -and actually applauded the artist after
his closing number, and then when he had kindly
returned and favored them with an encore, left be-
fore it was finished. Such an act is utterly inex-
cusable, and displays either the most deplorable lack
of breeding or indeed absence of ordinary common
sense.
Ann Arbor and the members of the University
pride themselves egotistically on their musical ap-
preciation, and with greatest sang-froid talk Chopin
and Bach and Beethoven, but if such occurrences as
have been so numerous of late continue the boasted
reputation will soon become an object of deserved
ridicule.
UNTYING REAL KNOTS
Another problem of technical education, that of
combinng the practical with the theoretical, ap-
proaches solution through the offer of the Western
Electric and Manufacturing company, volunteering
to make available for students the actual problems
which arise in the every day conduct of the busi-
ness. In addition the company will have one of its
best men, who happens to be B. G. Lamme, its
chief engineer, and one of the foremost designers
of electrical machines in the country, devote part of
his time in reviewing the answers to these problems
as they are worked out by students.
Here is an opportunity for the student to harness
his technical knowledge to actual problems, to ap-
ply his mastery of theory to the practical questions
which must be met every day in a large. industrial
concern. More than that it will give the student
a Glose insight into what the difficulties which con-
front a manufacturing concern actually are, and will
allow him to think out his solutions for these dif-
ficulties with an assurance that he is thinking to
some purpose. There is great satisfaction in setting
one's teeth in some knot which actually demands
untying.
The problems, according to an engineering pro-
fessor, show a striking interest in fundamental the-
ory. This fact is a direct proof that the emphasis
laid on theory by the technical school is not mis-
placed, and it is sure to set forth the actual value of
sound training in fundamentals to every student
who attempts to solve any of these problems.
TO BANISH THOSE BLUES
Thanksgiving is over, Christmas but a few weeks
off, and a a result the holiday spirit of festivity and
idleness seems to have gripped the campus. The
only gloom in the path of the joy seekers is the fact
that mid-semester examinations are in our midst.
However, a let down at this period might carry
with it dire results. Instructors are reluctant to ac-
cept the alibi of being overburdened with invita-
tions to parties or similar excuses as satisfactory
explanations for poor blue books. It is merely a
question of doing the work or of suffering the
consequences. If you have permitted your work
to slip now is the time to concentrate and bring it
up to standard. If you have done good consistent
work this is no time to rest on your laurels.
It is easy to be a victim of the holiday lust for.
pleasure. But a little scholarly effort sandwiched
,in between good times will serve effectively to ban-
?sh the blue book blues.
The T elescope
T Hlo a
The Hall of Pame

Our latest pledge
FO'r Etta Bitta Pi
National honorary fraternity is
The stude who thinks a
Galosh
Is some kind of
Boarding house
Mixture. -Art.
On the Safe Side
Some of our freshmen remind us of the man who
took out an accident policy because he was afraid
that someday a thought might strike him.
Quoth Eppie Taf:
We hear no more
Of Deacon Drake,
He pressed the gas
'Stead of the brake.
- Winifred.
Our Latest Song Entitled:
"The Boxer Wished to Run Away, But They
Had Roped Him In."

...

CAN YOU BELIEVE IT?

ALL

MEN'S

HIGH

SHOES

at $8.85

a pair

Open Evenings until Xmas

GRAHAM'S
Both Stores

IT'S A FACT

REGULAk "RUBY" SHOES TOO

--

Atfr rb

4'.

TI&Ub H:

;Jur.

NICKLES ARCADE

1

DETROIT UNITED LINES
Ann Arbor and Jackson
TIME TABLE
(raetern Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars-6.o5 a.
M., 7:05 a. in., 8:to a. m. and hourly to 9 :r
p. M.
Jackson Express Cars (local stops of Ann,
Arbor), 9:48 a. m. and every two hours to
9:48 p. m.
Local Cars East Bound-5:5S a.m., 7:0. a.
m. and ever two hours, to 9:oo p. im., tI:oo
p. mn. To Ypsilanti only-x :40 P. in., 1z.25
a. in., 1:15 a. m.
To Saline, change at Ypsilanti.'
Local Cars West Bound-7:5 a. m., 2:40 p.
To Jackson and Kalamazoo-Limited cars:
8:48, 10:48 a.,im,, t2:48, 2:48, 4:48.
To Jackson and Lansing-Limited: 8:48
p. m.
1921 NOVEMBER 1921
6 7 8 9 10 11 12
13 14 15 16 17 18 19
20 21 22 29 24 25 26
27 28 29 30
NOTICE TO MEN
We do all kinds of high-class Hat
work at pre-war prices. Hats turned
inside out, with all new trimmings.
are as good as new.
FACTORY HAT STORE
617 PACKARD STREET
Telephone 1792
Headquarters for
Dance and

Hemstitching Picot Edge Dress Pleating. Plain Stitching
Gold and Silver Thread Work
ASK TO SEE THE CHRISTMAS GIFTS AND IDEAS AT
QUALITY HEMSTITCHING SHOP
711 NORTH UNIVERSITY AVENUE PHONE 2526
Room.12, Over Arcade Theatre
MRS. G. E. MICKLE ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN

R. H. Fyfe &- Co., Detroit
y* .
\:s t . ws" . -

Fine Shoes

Ba
P r

nq u.

et

o grams
De Luxe

New Lines in.
Paper, Leather, Wood
and Celluloid
the
Mayer-Schairer
Company
112 South Main Street

It is notable of Fyfe shoes that their built-in style and
character distinguish them throughout their long term of
service.
For the convenience of our university customers a corn-
plete display of leading Fyfe models is maintained on the
second floor above Calkins' Drug Store.
Prices range from the moderate figures upward.
Tom Lally, Representative
On Grand Circus Park
DETROIT

I

;,[

I

I

LEAVING CONCERTS EARLY
A practice as senseless as it is exasperating is that
indulged in by altogether too many Michigan stu-
dents and residents of Ann Arbor, namely, leaving
concerts and other programs in Hill auditorium a
few minutes before the close of the final number.
Not only is it annoying to those who come for the
jurpose of listening to the program, but it is also a
direct affront to theartist on the stage, as the acous-
tic properties of the auditorium are such that the
sound occasioned by the slightest disturbance is
greatly magnified, and in the case of an artist of
temperament such an occurrence is often, to say the
least, unfortunate in its results.
The practice just referred to was especially no-
ticeable in the recent McCormack concert and in
the organ recital Thanksgiving day. On both oc-
casions a number. of people in various parts of the
auditorium rose and left either just preceding or
actually during the final number. No matter how
boresome a program may be, when an individual is
perfectly aware that the next number is the last, it
is only a matter of common courtesy to his fellow-
sufferers to endure the remainder of the program.

i

y

Just one of our "Shoe Specials"

°:

Bockton-plain, conservative last
Oxford $8.25 Bal. $8.60
They were $16.50
ALL SIZES

I

Dear Erm:
Dear Paul:

Can a tan gent believe in sines?
Yours, Paul Mall.
Of cosecant.

WAGNER & COMPANY
For Men Since 1848
STATE STREET A T LIBERTY

Famous Closing Lines
"If ignorance is bliss this must be paradise,"
quoth he on tour of the Home for Feeble-minded.
ERM.

4

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