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November 30, 1921 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-11-30

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WEATHER
' PROBABLY SNOW
TODAY

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ASSOCIATEE
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT 1R
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VOL. XXXII. No. 56 ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 1921 PRICE FIVE CE

CHINA WANTS BIG /
'CNCSSIONS ON
FARSEST TOPICS
EXTRA RIGHTS OF POWERS MAY
BE ABANDONED WITHIN
"YEAR
PRESS "10 POINTS" IN
SOLUTION OF PROBLEMS
Foreign Troops and Wire Systems
May Be Retired in Further-
ance of Integrity
(By Associated Press)
Washington, Nov. 29. - China wants
further concessions today in the con-
ference of the nine powers on ques-
tions affecting the Pacific and the Far
East.
In conformity with the Root reso-
lution declaring for the territorial and
adminstrative integrity of China, the
Pacific and Far Eastern committee
adopted resolutions looking to aban-
donment of foreign courts in China.
Extra Rights May Go
The resolution, drafted by the sub-
committee headed by Senator Lodge,
provides for an international commis-
sion of jurists, which is to report
within a year whether the Chinese
laws and court practices warrant
abandonment of the foreign courts
created under treaties granting extra
territorial rights in China.
Immediately after these resolutions
were adopted the Chinese delegates
pressed another of their "10 points",
that declaring for withdrawal of all
foreign troops from Chinese soil, and
also for abandonment of foreign tel-
egraph radio, and police wire sys-
tems. Dr. Fze, Chinese minster here
and a delegate to the conference,
presented detailed information re-
garding the number of troops and ex-
tent of foreign wire systems, in which
the Japanese predominate, and there
was wide discussion of the question
by all the delegates behind closed
doors.
Foreign Troops to Leave ,Country
General adherence, it was said, was
given to the principle of retirement o
foreign troops and wire systems from
China in conformity with the princi-
ple of the Root resolution. Qualifica-
tions were. presented, however, by
Japanese spokesmen, who held the ne-
cessity of policing railroads and tele-
graph lines.
Discussion of troop and telegraph
questions are to continue tomorrow,
with prospects that a solution will be
worked out by the delegates of the
nine powers, without reference of the
details to a sub-committee.
He 6GUTHE WILL TALK
ON ARCHAEOLOGY FRIDAY
LECTURE AT UNITARIAN CHURCH
WILL BE BASED ON TRIP
IN WaST INDIES
Dr. Carl Guthe will deliver an 11-
lustrated address on "Hunting Ruined
Cities in Guatemala" at 7:30 o'clock
Friday evening in the Unitarian
church. The lecture will be based
on a trip taken in the spring of 1920,
through Britis Honduras and Guate-
mala to the great lake, Reden-Itza,

in the heart of the Northern jungle,
The talk will include a recital of ex-
periences undergone in the hitherto
unknown ru'ms of a large Indian city
flourishing in the time before the birth
of Charlemagne.
Dr. Guthe is .the son of the late
Dean K. L. Guthe, of. the Graduate
school and former head of the phys-
ics departemnt. Dr. Guthe at one
time attended the Engineering school
here, but later became interested in
archaeology, and since completing a
graduate course at Harvard university
has been on eight expeditions, four of
which he has directed. The lecture is
open to the public. Admission will
be free.
Kentucliy Club Elects Offiers
Officers of the Kentucky club f)r the1
coming year were elected last night
as follows: R. E. Adams, '23, pres-j
ident; John M. Burge, '23, vice-pres-
ident, and Joseph W. Morey, '22, sec
retary and treasurer.

Whimsies Nears Professionalism In
Literary Efforts Of Contributors

(By Marian Kerr)
Whimsies, literary magazine, bids
fair to become Whimsies "magazine of
professional literature," if the number
of professionally recognized contribu-
tors to this month's issue is an indi-
cation. Of the 14 contributors five of
them have had writings accepted in
professional circles.
Contributors Professional
Ruth Lechlitner, '23, contributing
"My Little One is Dead," has had two
poems accepted by a leading poetry
magazine. N. Ermentrude Martin, '24,
and Rosaline Dunlap, ex-'24, have been
recognized in Schnittkin's "Anthology
of Poetry of the Future." Stories by
Lawrence Conrad, '23, have been fre-
quent In current magazines. Robert
Frost is also a contributor to this is-
sue.
By far the most magnificent piece of
DISCUSSION1SOPI
Faculty Men to Meet with Various
Fraternities at Regular
.} Intervals
PRESIDENT BURTON HEARTILY
APPROVES OF NEW MOVEMENT
Organization of a campus interfra-
ternity group for the purpose of dis-
cussion of University problems took
place last night when 38 representa-
tives of campus fraternities and house
clubs met at the Union, where Presi-
dent Marion L. Burton outlined the
means to them by which they could
become an effective and useful or-
ganization. Prof. C. F. Kent, of Yale
university, was a guest.
The plan of organization, initiated
by the educational department of the
S. C. A., provides that representatives
from all campus fraternities shall
hold monthly meetings at which 'tme
certain facultymembers, acting as
leaders of the discussion groups, shall
openly discuss with the students the
current problems of the University.
The meetings of the organization will
be held at the fraternity houses.
President Burton in his address be-
fore the group last night said that
such an organization had three pur-
poses: Modernization of the under-
graduate's viewpoint, appreciation of
frank and intelligent discussion, and
the benefit of the intermingling of the
students and the faculty.
SUNO WALL TO ANNOUNCE
PHYSICAL WELFARE PLAN
BETTER FACILITIES PLANNED
FOR HEALTH SERVICE AND
SANITATION
That the Students' Physical Welfare
department wil have definite plans to
make public after the meeting of the
Board of Regents, Dec. 9, was the opin-
ion of Dr. John Sundwall, director of
the department, when questioned yes-
terday.
Dr. Sundwall said that he hoped to
provide better facilities for the Uni-
versity.,Health service when the op-
portunity presented itself, and that
he has plans for changes In the intra-
mural sports which he hopes to be
able to put into force after certain
decisions have been made.
"I consider the problem of stu-
dents' diet one of our most important
in correcting physical ills," the Doctor
explained. He expressed the belief

that eventually the department would
provide for the inspection of sanitary
conditions of local boarding houses,
giving them certificates with a rating,
such as is done by the boards of
health in certain of our larger cities.
"Students are inclined to over-eat, and
the habit of eating between meals is
both expensive and destructive to
health," he concluded.
Dr. Sundwall has been recently se-
cured from the University of Minne-
sota to direct this new department.
BURSLEY ATTENDS NEW YORK
INTERFRATERNITY MEETING
tJoseph A. Bursley, Dean of Students,
atended over the week end an interfra-
ternity conference at the University
club in New York City.

work appearing is Lyndon Babcock's
"Two Thousand Years After," a one-
act tragedy having the stirring appeal
that would have done justice to the
younger days of a Henrik Ibsen. The
action of the play is carried on almost
entirely outside the stage, and this
peculiarly different problem of handl-
ing has been done with remarkable
skill.
Eight Poems in Number
Of the eight poems appearing, the
"Sanskrit Salutation to the Dawn," by
N. Ermentrude Martin, '24, isperhaps I
the most polished, having in it a touch
of Shelley. Ruth Lechlitner'., "My Lit-
tle One is Dead," is decidedly a work
of art, with its pitiful cry fcr the cold
little hands, and following it is the
strength of a glorious philosophy.
Lawrence Conrad's "Traces" is hum-
anly warm, and retrospective. It sav-
ors of the Joyce Kilmer frankness of
style.
The longest fiction, "Half a Loaf,"
by Wessel Smitter, shows a little too
conscious touch of the conservative,
fear of being "flashingly red". He be-
gins his story like a David Grayson
essay. It is quietly humorous but a
little too rhetorical.
(Continued on Page Ten)
PER SEATS ON
SAL TO WOMEN
Preference Offered This Afternoon at
Box Office in Hill
Auditorium
PUBLIC MAY BUY TICKETS AT
WHITNEY THEATER TOMORROW
Women of the University will today
receive preference In obtaining tickets
for "Make It for Two", the sixteenth
Union opera which opens here on
Monday, Dec. 5, at the Whitney thea-
ter.
A box office sale will be held from
2 to 5 o'clock this afternoon at Hill
auditorium. Precedence in the line
will be extended according to the
numbers which appear on the face
of the application blanks. Women
holding applications with numbers
from 1 to 100 may exchange them for
seats between 2 and 3 o'clock, num-
bers from 101 to 200 between 3 and 4
o'clock, numbers from 201 up between
4 and 5 o'clock. It is urged that wom-
en be present atthe designated times
if they wish any preference in secur-
ng tickets.
An onportunity to obtain tickets will
be given to the general public tomor-
row when a box office sale will be
held at the Whitney theater. Applica-
tion blanks for seats in any house in
which the opera plays during its tour
may still be secured by applying at the
Union.
RO SBOCK TELLSPRESS
CLUB. oF EXPEIENCES
SAYS JOURNALIST MUST SHOW
RESOURCEFULNESS AND
FORESIGHT

MUSICAL CONCERT,
PLEASES AUDIENCE'
Glee and Mandolin Clubs Offer Varied
Program in Sixty-Third Annual
Fall Presentation
SPECIALTY ANDS ENSEMBLE
ACTS COMPLETE PROGRAMj
From the opening strains of "Laudes
Atque Carmina," to the last stirring
strains of "The Victors," sung in parts
for the first time in many years, the
63rd annual fall concert of the Glee
and Mandolin clubs was a complete
success.
Before an audience approximating
more than 2,000, the club augmented
by specialty numbers including a
string sextet, Robert Dieterle, '23M, a'
singer whose work has met with un-
stinted praise in many a campus pro-
duction, the Varsity quartet, and the
Varsity quintet, the latter being one
of the hits of the last Band Bounce,
offered a program of well mingled
classic and popular selecions that
drew round after round 'bf hearty ap-
plause.
Following the rendition of "Laudes
Atque Carmina" the Glee club sang
Verdi's "Oh, Hail Us, Ye Free," with
a power and harmonious unison that
showed to advadtage the results of
excellent voices and splendid train-
ing.
The opening numbers were followed
by "Au Bord D'un Ruisseau," by De
Boisdeffre, an excellent composition
rendered by the Mandolin club, and
Robert Dieterle succeeded that num-
ber with a selection of songs.
The string sextet, three violins, a
viola, bass viola, and cello, drew ap-
plause by their presentation of Krug's
"Der Hirte Blast im Mandenschein,"
and the Varsity quartet, with three
regular vocal numbers and two en-
cores.
Two more numbers by the Glee
club, "Breeze of Night" and "Ole Uncle
Moon," preceded the Varsity quintet,
whose banjo act will be remembered
from the fall Band Bounce. Three
regular numbers and a generous list
of encores failed' to silence the de-
mands of the crowd for more.
SERVICE MEN'SMOVIE AT
HILL AUDITORIUM WILL
AID EAING Room fUND
PROGRAM CONSISTS OF LATEST
VIOLA DANA PICTURE
AND COMEDY

BEGIN TESTIMONY
AGAINST SAWYER
FOR DISBARMENT
Many witnesses were examined yes-
terday in the proceedings of the dis-
barment case against Andrew J. Saw-
yer, attorney, in the circuit court
rooms of the county court house here.
Mr. Sawyer is charged with conduct
unprofessional and unbecoming a law-
yer. The charges were filed aagainst
Mr. Sawyer by Prosecuting Attorney
Jacob Fahrner of Ann Arbor.
The court room was crowded with
people interested in the case. The
testimony of Iona Poland, who was
found unconscious on State street last
year, was given in the morning. Other
witnesses presented their testimony,
and were cross-examined by the de-
fense.
Court was adjourned yesterday aft-
ernoon and will convene again at 9
o'clock this morning.-
PRICE lWAR HTO GET,
Deans' Committee Recommends $00
Bq Contributed by University'
for Investigation
QUESTION TO BE DISCUSSED
AT NEXT REGENTS' MEETING
Recommendation has been made by
the deans' committee appointed by
President Marion L. Burton that the
University co-operate with the local
Chamber of Commerce in an investiga-
tion of alleged profiteering in Ann
Arbor, and that the University ad-
vance a sum equal to that raised by
the Charhber of Commerce to cover ex-
penses incidental to such an investi-
gation.
Paul L. Proud, president of the Ann
Arbor Chamber of COnmerce, in an
interview Tuesday afternoon, stated
that they had raised about $800 to-
wards an investigation and that prob-
ably an additional amount could be
raised should it be found necessary.
Mr. Proud states that the, Chamber of
Commerce is awaiting action on the
part of the University.
According to Dean Joseph A. Burs-
ley it is anticipated that this matter
will be considered by the Regents in
their next meeting, which is expected
to be held within the next 10 days.
ai
COMPANY WIfL AID
SCENARIO WRITERS'

IRISH S ITUATION
BECOMES SERIOUS
AS PALEY1FILS
PROPOSAL OF SINN FEIN FOR ALI
IRELAND PARLIAMENT
REJECTED
LLOYD GEORGE CALLS
FOR NEW PEACE TERMS
Niegotiations Will Be Continued on
New Basis Although Deadlock
Still Holds
(By Associated Press)
London, Nov. 29. .- An anxious day
in the negotiations designed for the
pacification of Ireland ended tonighi
with the hope that a complete col-
lapse of the parleys might be averted
Sir James Craig, premier of Ulster
as was expected, declared before the
northern parliament at Belfast that
Ulster had absolutely refused to ac-
cept an all-Ireland parliament, de-
manded as a solution by the Sinn Fein
delegation. He announced his will-
ingness to discuss other proposals for
an Irish settlement if they were sub.
mitted by next Tuesday.
Premier Lloyd George immediately
summoned the Sinn Fein delegates to
consult with him and his minsters and
submitted to them new proposal
which, if they meet with approval of
the Sinn Fein, will be presented to
the Ulster official before next Tues
day. The nature of the alternative
proposal will not be divulged pending
their consideration by the Sinn Fein.
ers.
The situation still is 4ery critica
owing to the double deadlock - Ul
ster refusing to' enter an all-Ireland
parliament and the Sinn Fein stead
ily refusing to yield on the question
of allegiance to the crown. The nego
tiations, however, have not been brok
en off,'and may be continued on a new
basis.
ALSTATE CONFERENCE
OF CHRISTIAN STUDENTS

OPENS HERE ON

Fi

With unusual informality and good
humor, Frank W. Rosbock, business
manager of the Newspaper Enterprise
association, spoke before the Students'
Press club last night at the Union, tell-
ing of his experiences in interviewing
such celebrities as the German crown
prince. He went into detail in pointing
out the obstacles which had to be over-
come before he could see the crown
prince, and pointed out that persev-
erance and resourcefulness were dom-
inant factors in getting the interview.
"Sixty per cent of the best stories I
ever got were from fellows whom I
hardly knew at all," Rosbock declared,
as he pointed' out the necessity of a
reporter having a wide acquaintance
among all classes of people.
In the modern newspaper world it
is hard to beat the rival papers to a
story, Rosbock said, adding that it
could only be accomplished through
anticipation. He gave as an example
an event in which an editor anticipat-
ed a riot in- a southern city, and had
his reporter on the place before it had
a good start. Accuracy, fairness, and
a good imagination were also elabor-
ated upon as being necessary requis-
Ites of a good newspaper man,

In "There Are No Villains", Viola
Dana's latest picture, which will be'
presented tonight in Hill auditorium'
by the campus service men's organi-'
zations in an attempt to earn money
to complete the Union reading room,
some thrilling features of what se-
cret grvice agents have to undergo
in their attempts to break up opium'
smuggling on the west coast are por-
trayed.
As a Federal operator Miss " Dana
finds that there is considerable con-
flict between the law of the land and
love, and when as a member of the
law force she falls in love with one
of the supposed smugglers there is a
keen batt of wits to prove that her
woman's intuition is more reliable
than the evidence gathered by the
sleuths.
A notable cast supports the Metro
star, headed by Gaston Glass, the
Frenchman of "Humoresque" fame
who came to the United States in
support of Sarah Bernhardt in her
last American tour.
A Buster Keaton comedy, Kennedy's
Society orchestra in the pit, and or-
gan mu1sic for the tragic parts will
complete the night's entertainment.
Admission will be 35 cents.
'23 LITS TO ELECT
J-HOP COMMITTEE
All junior lits will meet at 4 o'clock
today in the auditorium of Newberry
hall for the purpose of electing the
chairman and three members to the
J-Hop committee. As the meeting will
be very important, all, members are
urge'd to attend.
Have you sent in your scenario for
the University movie yet?

A representative of the motion pic-
ture producing company with which
The Daily has arranged a University
movie arrived in Ann Arbor yester-<
day afternoon to consult with stu-
detts who are entering the scenario
competition that will close Dec. 3. He1
will be in $he city from the present{
time until the production of the movie1
is completed and can be consulted
from 2 to' 4to'clock any afternoon in.
the publications reading room, Press
building.
Complete information can be given
to scenario writers or others who are
interested in the picture by this mem-
ber of the producing company. He
has had experience for some time with
the actual filming of movies at the
corporation's studios in the West.
The chief thing necessary for a suc-
cessful scenario in a motion picture
such as the one planned, according
to a statement of the judges issued
made to contain a complete cross-sec-
tion of University life. This experi-
tio of University life. This experi-
ment is being tried by The Daily in
conjunction with the producers with
the aim of making a picture of Amer-
ican university life, and the plot must
therefore contain a college -atmosphere
as its first element.
The plots are not required to be ex-
actly 1,500 words in length, contrary
to an impression among students on
the campus. That number was 'a con-
venient one named by the producers
as typical of the ordinary movie plot,
and if the synopsis is brief and con-
cise any number required to tell the
story adequately will be acceptable.

PRESIDENT BURTON WILL GIVE
OPENING ADDRESS TO 300
DELEGATES
More than 300 representatives of
college christian associations will
meet in Ann Arbor on Friday and Sat-
urday of this week to a.ttend the State
Christian Callings Conference for Col-
lege Men. Half of these delegates are
from the University of Michigan and
from the rest of the schools and col-
leges in the state.
The conference will open at 4
o'clock Friday in Lane hall. Here the
registration and assignments for'the
sessions will take place. At 6 o'clock
there will be a. banquet at the Meth-
odist Episcopal church. President
Marion L. Burton, Dr. Charles W. Gil-
key and Bishop W. P. Remington are
the speakers at the banquet, while
Dr. Chapman, of the Methodist church,
will be the presiding officer.
Saturday's sessions begin at 8:30
o'clock and will continue until 10:45
o'clock. In the afternoon the meet-
ings will be held at 1:30 o'clock and
will continue 'until 2:30 o'clock.

KENT AND ENGLE
ADDRESS ASSEMBLY
Devotional service at 9 o'clock yes
terday morning, presided over b'
Thomas S. Evans, opened the secon
day of the Religious Education a
sembly which is being held in Lan
hall. The morning address was "Mod
ern Biblical Interpretation" and Pro
Charles F. Kent, of Yale universit:
held the discussion period.
Addresses were made in the after
noon by J. H. Engle, general secretar
of the Michigan Sunday School asso
ciation, and by Professor Kent.
This morning at 9 o'clock there wi
be group and personal interviews wit
Professor Kent and Secretary Engle,

Fire Damages Carver's Home
Fire was discovered shortly before
7 o'clock last night in the home of
Prof. Henry C. Carver, of the mathe-
matics department, at 1110 Judson
court. The fire was caused by an over-
heated furnace and burned a hole
through the floor above.

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