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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 18, 1921 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-11-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY

rSt §f It
OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER Of THE UNIVERSITY
-OF MICHIGAN
° Published every morning except Monday during te ,Unver
sity year by the Board in Control o Studet Pubiicticns.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use fer
republication of all news dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
credited in this paper and the local news published therein.
Entered at the postoillce at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
class matter.
Sunscription by carrier or mail, $3.50.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press building, Maynard Street.
Phones: Business, 960; Editorial, 2414.
Communications not to exceed Soo words, if signed, the sig-
nature not necessarily to appear in print, but as an evidence of
faith, and notices of events will be published in The Daily at the
discretion of the Editor, if left at or mailed to The Daily office.
Unsigned communications will receive no consideration. No man-
~uscript will be returned unless the writer incloses postage.
The Daily does not necessarily endorse the sentiments ex-
pressed in the communications.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2411
MANAGING EDITOR......... BREwsTER P. CAMPBELL
Assistant Managing Editor..................Hugh W. Hitchcock
City Editor. ............................E. P. Lovejoy, Jr.
Night Editors-
R. E. Adams G. P. Overton
Edward Lambrecht M. B. Stahl
Hughston MBain Paul Watzel
Editorial Board Chairman....... ...............T. J. Whinery
\ssistants--
S. T. Beach E. R. Meiss
L. A. Kern Leo Hershdorfer
Sunday Magazine Editor................Thornton W. Sargent, Jr.
Ixchange Editor.................................George E. Sloan
Music Editor................................Sidney B. Coates
Sporting Editor................................. George Reindel
Women's Editor..........................Elizabeth Vickery
Humor Editor .................................... E R. Meiss
Assistants
R. N. Byers L. L. Fenwick B. H. Lee
W. B. Butler H. B. Grundy E.L. Mack
A. D. Clark Agnes Holmquist* athrine Montgomery
Harry C. Clark H. E. Howlett R. C. Moriarity
IP. Comstock Marion Kerr 4 R. B. Tarr
ohn P. Dawson L. S. Kerr Virginia Tron
. A. Donahue M. A. Klaver Dorothy wipple
W. F. Elliott Marion Koch L. L. Post
J. B. Young
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 96
BUSINESS MANAGER .............VERNON F. HILLERY
Advertising.........................F. M. Heath, A. J. Parker
Publication ..................... ...... Nathan W. Robertson
Accounts ..............................John J. Hamels, Jr.
Circulation .................................. Herold C. Hunt
Assistants
Burr L. Robbins Richard Cutting H. Willis Heidbreder
W. Cooley James Prentiss W. Kenneth Galbraith
L. -Beaumont Parks Maurice Motle J. A. Dryer
Walter SchererrkMartin Goldring Richard Ieidemann
Edw. Murane Tyler Stevens T. H. Wolfe
David Park Paul Blum
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 1921 .-
Night Editor-EDW. F. LAMBRECHT
Assistant-John P. Dawson
Proofreaders-Millard H. Pryor, Mor-
ris E. Gordon
BETTING
There has been much said about betting. When
the subject is broached many students thing to them-
selves, "Oh, just another sermon." There are two
ways of looking at the betting evil. As a moral
blot on the school in which it takes place, or as a
practical nuisance.
For those who cannot realize the disgrace to their
institution by indulging in such forms of loyalty,
mostly mercenary, the dangers of the practice
should form a bar to further indulgence.
To begin with, betting grows on the participant,
like any other form of gambling. He bets more
than he can afford to lose, and often after a "sure"
thing, he finds himself compelled to borrow money
to keep him going the rest of the month. And of
course this borrowed money must be paid back la-
boriously, little by little.
Betting opens the door to professional gamblers,
who are quick to swarm into a college town where
betting is wide-spread in the desire for "easy
money". Having had more experience the profes-
sional gamblers are usually successful. And it is
usually the professional gambler who taunts the
student that he isn't showing support for his team
unless he crosses his lily white palm with money.
But most important of all is the effect of betting
on the team. When a team wins and the student
body begins to bet large sums of money it makes the
men feel that much depends upon their efforts. They
have the feeling that they are responsible for the

financial condition of their schoolmates. As a re-
sult, they are so worried by what MIGHT happen'
if they should lose that they cannot play their
best. It has a tendency to disintegrate the sports-
manship of both winners and losers, for the knowl-
edge that he has lost a large sum of money on a
game makes a student less loyal to his team in the
face of reverses. It makes the team nervous be-
eLde they know they are expected to win and that
i they don't they will be severely criticised.
"If betting on college football games is not en-
tirely abolished, I woujd not be surprised to see a
football scandal similar to that which took place
recently in organized baseball," is the opinion of
Branch Rickey, president and manager of the St.
Louis Cardinals, and a Michigan alumnus.
At the recent Upperclass advisors' meeting, Gus
Goetz said, "I don't think there is another thing
that hurts the Michigan team more than betting. It
is one of the biggest things that is hurting Michi-
gan spirit."
"Andy" Smith, head coach at the University of
California, has said, "I think betting will be the
death knell of college football unless it is stopped
before it goes any farther. It breaks up the morale
of the squad.."
Anyway you look at it, betting is a losing propo-
sition. It has been practically stopped at Illinois
and California. Let's stop it at Michigan.

universities throughout the country. Recently Wis-
consin took moving pictures of it in order to for-
ward a drive for such a student activity center at
Madison. While others are raising funds and rap-
idly completing institutions of the same type as the
Union, our own building, the guide in their con-
struction, remains an unfinished work. After an
expenditure of approximately one million dollars, a
sum of fifty thousand dollars has for two years
stood between the present condition of the Union
and a building complete in every detail.
This season the members of the American Le-
gion, Gun and Blade, and Veterans of Foreign
Wars organizations on the campus have determined
to raise the funds necessary for the completion of
the reading room in the Union. Instead of insti-
tuting a drive which might prove a burdensome
drain upon the overtaxed resources during a lean
year, the three organizations have decided upon a
program of dances and entertainments to pile up
the money. The first two of these are scheduled to
take place tonight and tomorrow night in the ofrm
of Memorial dances to be held in Barbour gymna-
sium. The ex-service men are staging not only a
dance, but an entertainment of merit, something
different and more elaborate than the usual week-
end affairs in. Ann Arbor.
Combining entertainment and a chance to help
complete one of the biggest projects that Michigan
has undertaken, the Memorial dances should be at-
tended by all who had planned on this form of
amusement for today or tomorrow as well as a
goodly number who had not as yet done so.
A CLASS DUES DAY
The matter of collecting class dues is one which
has stumped the officer of classes for many years.
It doesn't seem to be so much a matter of the stu-
dents being unwilling to pay as it is that they "just
don't get around to it," as one of them has ex-
pressed it. But now a new system has been evolved,
a "Class Dues day" established and with the mat-
ter brought so poignantly to the mind of every stu-
dent, it seems inexcusable if after next Tuesday,
November 22, any dues are left unpaid.
Class dues are necessary. Each year certain bills
are incurred by the various classes which must be
met and the obligations which they represent can be
discharged in only one way and that through the
medium of a tax levied on all of the members ofthe
classes. A full knowledge of the duty which he
has as a member of his class should make each in-
dividual realize that the payment of his dues should
not be delayed. November 22 is the day. Have
your money ready.
WEAR THOSE TOQUES!
Wearing of class toques by all classes of the Uni-
versity, from the humble freshman to the "grad",
has the endorsement of the Stundent council. It is
hoped that all members of the University will wear
their respective headgear at the Minnesota game
Saturday and continue the custom throughout the
winter months.
Toques are inexpensive, and it would be regret-
table if tradition were allowed to die out through
lack of interest. Let everyone that can be present
at the game Saturday wearing the symbol of his
class. If you have not already bought your class
toque, there is plenty of time left between now and
the game tomorrow to do so.
Tomorrow is the time to get it back at the ar-
rogant sophs in a fair contest, men of '25. You have
today left to bring about a turnout that won't give
the redmen a chance.

Agents for the Roycrofters

GRAHAM'S
Both ends of the diagonal Jaalk

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DETROIT UNITED LINES
Ann Arbor and Jackson
TIME TABLE
(Ea'tern Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars-.-6.o5 a.
m., 7:os a. in., 8:xo a. m. and hourly to g:to
p. mn.
Jackson Express Cars (local stops of Ann
Arbor), 9:48 a. m. and every two hours to
9:48 p. in.
Local Cars East Bound-s:55 a.m., 7:00 a.
m. and every' t,*o hours) to 9g:oo p. in., xi:oo
p. Mi. To Ypsilanti only-is1:4o p. in., 12.25
a. in., x :1s a. Mn.
To Saline, change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars West Bound- :o a. in., 2:40 p.
in.
To Jackson and Kalamazoo-Limited cars:
8:48, 1o:48 a. in., 12:48, 2:48, 4:48.
To Jackson and Lansing-Limited: 8:48
P. in.
1921 NOVEMBER 1921
1 2 3 4 6
6 7 8 9 10 11 12
13 14 16 16 17 18 19
20 21 22 23 24 25 26
27 28 29 30
NOTICE TO MEN
We do all kinds of high-class Hat
work at pre-war prices. Hats turned
inside out, with all new trimmings,
are as good as new.
FACTORY HAT STORE
617 PACKARD STREET
Telephone 1792

TAXI
PHONE
oDDE CABS 999~

s

WHAT DO YOU WANT?

SOMETHING NEW!
Real Meals, with Snappy Service and
All Good Things Combined.

ASTEAM 6 GAS FIITG

We Cater to Both Ladies and Gentlemen

TELEPHONE 214 F-1

i

UNIVERSITY DINING ROOMS
1212 SOUTH UNIVERSITY AVENUE
Two Doors East of Church Under New Management
3 MEALS-$7 PER WEEK 2 MEALS - $6 PER WEEK

YOU, MR. STUDENT
should have use for
a typewriter. You
can rent one from us
for three months for
$7.50 tup. Or you
can rent with privi-
lege of buying. At
any time up to six
months we will allow
all rent you have
paid to count against
sale price of machine. There is no obli-
gation to buy.- This offer is made to
save you money ifIyou find you want to
own a machine after first renting.
Your Choice of Makes
State your choice: Underwood,nRem-
ington I,. C. Smith, etc. Every machine
is perect-rebuilt by the famous "Young
Process." This process is our own. It is
recognized the country over. It is back
of our ironclad guarantee which makes
you judge and jury. We grant ro days'
free trial on all our machines. You run
no risk.
Gct Our Prices
We save you ,o per cent and up on type-
writers. All makes and models to select
from-the largest selected stock of ma-
chines in America. Send for catalog be-
fore you rent or buy anywhere. Write
today!
YOUNG TYPEWRITER COMPANY
25 W. Lake St., Dept. 234, Chicago
Phone Central 46

I

i

Metalic
Hats
Veiling
Pattern

..
-
t
a
,-
r -s"

I

Veils

Flowers

Puyear & Hintz
328 So. Main St.

! 1

A

The, Telescope

i

Wear a Toque Saturday

To a Straigt-edge
My Everready didn't work,
My Gem was on the blink,
My Durham-Duplex fell and broke -
Into the kitchen sink.
Unsharpened was my spare Gillette,
It failed to dent my hedge,
So like a fool I tried to use
My room-mate's pet straight-edge.
Oh neophite unto the realm
Of newly leathered steel,
No blinded course so uncertain,
No torture half so real.

Another

interesting

bit of TOQUE

Bring back the face I had before,
And I will take a pledge
That I shall borrow nevermore
My room-mate's pet straight-edge.
Someone said that the rumor that fellows slept
under the berths on the Special train to Madison is
the bunk. We agree with him. It was the bunk.
--Dormitory Dot.
Quoth Eppie Taff:
You'll see no more
Of Otto Haver,
The Medics sought
A new cadaver.
Coop.
Our Freshman Friend
Says that the Block M next Saturday will be the
best that it's been in years. He knows, because
he's in it.
Famous Closing IUnes
"You look like the devil," said one masquerader
to his companion. ERM.

history

CUPID PLIES TRADE
THROUGH FUR CAPS
ANN ARBOR, Mich., Dec. 22.-Early Tues-
day morning when smoke rose perpendicu-
larly from the chimneys and the walks
squeaked under foot a hurrying figure shot
along State street.
"Bang!" went an upstairs window in the
Psi Upsilon house.
"Whoopee, they're here," was the cry to
two pajama-clad "studes."
Inside of a half hour there as a stam-~
pede for thedown town stores to purchase
the new official campus headgear. The stu-
dent council has said that Johnny Wolver-
ine is to wear a neat fur toque this winter,
instead of the old skull caps and motley
array of other styles. The 4,000 and odd
grinds, frat. men, diggers and other types
hit the cement trail for the shops as soon
as they knew the caps were in town.
Purchaser No. 10 made the most important
discovery of all. He dug a letter out of his
toque. On the heralding of the news of his
find there occurred stampede No. 2.
This is what the fellow found:
Dear Gentlemens-I am a nice girl.
I works in a cap factory what made this
cap. Maybe you would sometimes like
to write mit me.
RACHAEL KRAVOTSKY.
Another fellow found this:
Oh You College Kids-I'm jist dyin'
to meet one of youse students. I'm
working here in the cap factory, but I
go all over and maybe you will meet
me, dearie. I go to Kalamazoo and
Grand Rapids two or three times a year.
When you are there call and see
GENIEVE GRAHAM.
When the student council made the an-
nouncement of the new style winter head-
gear every dealer in town- immediately or-
dered such caps. They all came from a
Lansing factory.
The new University of Michigan headgear
is a success as far as popuarity is concern-
ed The campus today was dotted with the
men wearing the toques and it is not un-
likely that some of the co-eds may take to
wearing them.

Reprint from
the Detroit News
Dec. 22, 1909.

Our toques are official

WAGNER & COMPANY
For Men Since 1848
STATE STREET A T LIBERTY)

HELP rNISH THE JOB
The Michigan Union has since its construction
een the model for a number of like structures at

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