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November 18, 1921 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-11-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

. THE WEATHER
PROBABLY RAIN OR SNOW
TODAY

4w
A AL.
4Jit t

VOL. XXXII. No. 47

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 1921

WILL

MAKE

A

UNIVERSITY

SPIRIT RUNS iGH
ASHMEN OF '24
PLAN FOR GAMES
SOPHOMORES REQUEST PLAYERS
FOR CLASS BAND TO MEET
TOMORROW
FRESHMEN TO SELECT
LIEUTENANTS TONIGHT
Student Council Gives Special Rules
For Men on Both Sides In
Flag Rush
"Spirit" was the keynote of the eve-
ning when sophomores filled Natural
Science auditorium last night to or-
ganize for the Fall games toxiorrow
morning.
"You will be fighting for '24 and for
'25 when you fight Saturday," said A.
D. MacDonald, '22L, who addressed
the class upon the subject, "Pep". "A
beaten freshman class makes a bet-
ter Michigan class in the long run.
We must show Saturday's visitors that
Michigan still breeds fighting men."
Rules for Rush
C. H. Daly, '22L, who presided over
the meeting as a representative of the
Student council, announced the rules
of the contest, as follows:
Tennis shoes must be worn exclu'
sively in the contests. Absolutely no
tossing of'men over the heads of the
guarding side will be allowed, and it
this rule is disobeyed, the flag on the
pole at which this occurs will be for-
feited to the defending side. The
poles will net be greased and no
freshman will be allowed on the
poles at any time during the contests.
A whistle will start the rush and one
shot will stop the contest temporar-
ily, while two shots will signify the
period is ended and five minutes in-
termission will be given.
All men participating must follow
these regulations in every particular
or be barred from the contest.
H. G. Kipke, lit class president, and
M. B. Parsons, Fall games captain,
emphasized the fact that the class
must work as a unit in order to fight
effectively.
Sophs to Have Band
Every sophomore who can play any
kind of band instrument was request-
ed by the committee to be in front of
the Union at 8:30 o'clock Saturday
morning, so that the class band may
lead the parade to Ferry field.
Freshmen will gather in Natura
Sciene auditorium at 7 o'clock to-
night to arrange plans for the Fall
games to be held tomorow morning.
SHAKESPEBJAN CLASSES' SHOW
PROVES HIGHLY SUCCESSFUL
Remarkably effective was the pre-
sentation of the principal scenes of
"The Taming of the Shrew" as given
by the classes in Shakesperian read-
ing last night in Sarah Caswell An-
gell hall. Real dignity and reserve
characterized the impersonations and
nothing was overdone.
USHERS FOR MINNESOTA GAME
REQUESTED TO REPORT TODAY
Students who intend to act as ushers
at the Michigan-Minnesota game Sat-
urday, are requested to report either
at 3 o'clock this afternoon or at 7
o'clock tonight at the athletic offiee
in the Press building, in order to ob-

tain instructions and admission ticket
to the game.
Watch for the Pink Sheets

MICHIGANENSIAN
SALE ENDS WITH
TODAY'S DRIVE
"Students will be given their last
chance today to order their 'Ensian,"
said R. F. Wieneke, '22, business man-
ager. He also stated that more than
1,000 copies of the year book had been
subscribed for to date.
Bernard Segall, '24, maintained first
place among the salespeople by ob-
taining 31 orders yesterday. Second
and third places go to C. A. Weinman,
'24, and R. Carlyle Baker, '23, who se-
cured the sale of 26 and 22 copies yes-
terday.
The Michiganenslan is emphasizing
its policy of taking no new orders next
spring when the book is published.
"The year book is so expensive that we
can not order more copies than we
have advance subscriptions for," said
Wieneke yesterday. "At the time the
book makes its appearance there is al-
ways a demand for some extra copies,
but it is necessary to maintain the pol-
icy of giving them out only to those
who subscribed during the campaign."
MINNESOTA SEATS
NOT YET SOLDOHOT
Supply of Tickets for Game Saturday
on General Sae Until Time
of contest
ALL STUDENT REQUESTS
NOW ILLED BY OFFICE
There is still a goodly number of
tickets to be had for the Minnesota
game Saturday and these will remain
on general sale at the athletic office
until time for the game.
All student applications have been
taken care of and the seats thus al-
lotted were distributed in accordan
with the original checkerboard ar-
rangement of alternating students and
alumni.
All freshmen who made single ap-
plications were placed in the block
"M" in the west stand together with a
small number of sophomores who
were needed to complete the number
required for the "M". In no case,
however, were sophomores placed in
the west stand who had made requests
for additional seats.
All student applications were care
fully checked by the Athletc associa-
tion and in addition by a committee
from the Student punll with the
view of detecting any misstatements
regarding number of years on the
campus Out of the entire number of
applications filed only 25 men were
found to have intentionally, misrepre-
sented their classes and these men
were punished by being placed last
in student preference.
THE FIYEGRETEST-
If you had to pick the five greatest'
ends, the five greatest backs and the
five greatest linesmen that ever play-
ed football, what would your selec-:
tion be? Would your selection coin-
cide with those following?
Ends-Hinkey, Yale; Shelvin, Yale;
Hardwick, Harvard; Campbell, Har.
yard; Snow, Mcian.
Backs-Thorpe, Carlisle; Mahan,
Harvard; eston,.3Mchigan; Ecker-
sall, Chicago; Coy, Yale.
Linesmen-Schulz, Mihigan; Hef-
felfinger, Yale; Hare, Pennsylvania;
Cowan, Princeton; Cutts, Harvard.

In 1892 the Webster Literary society
staged a debate whose propostion was,
"Resolved, that a Negro state shall be
established in the United States.

ARMS CONFERENCE
WAITS FOR JAPN'
Far Eastern Negotiations Cannot Pro-
ceed Until Reply Is Made to
China's Demands
AMERICAN MOVE SLOWED UP
BY BRITAIN'S OBJECTIONS
(By Associated Press)
Washington, Nov. 17. - The Far
Eastern negotiations await the reply
of Japan to China's declaration of
rights and the American move for
limitation of naval armament is slow-
ing up because of objections raised
both by Japan and Great Britain.
Discussions of the Far Eastern
problems, which for the moment are in
the foreground of the arms confer-
ence, were advanced by the big nine
today to the point of an agreement
that a general exchange of views on
China's program should precede any
consideration of specific points. Such
a general presentation of views Ja
pan was 'unprepared to make, and the
big nine has adjourned until Satur-
day.
Meantime Japan made known form-
ally her desire to modify the Ameri-
can plan' of naval limitation so as to
give her a "slightly greater" relative
strength and the opposition of the
British to the submarine quota sug-
gested by the United 'States gave evi-
dence of such determination as to de-
tract the attention of the whole body
of delegates.
ATHLETIC PROGRAM SALE
STARTS THISAFTERNOON01?
Containing 40 pages of football news,
the annual souvenir football program
will go on sale at 4 o'clock this aft-
ernoon on the campus. The price of
the program will be 25 cents.
The program will contain individual
cuts of the players of both teams in
tomorrow's game. Articles giving a
history of the Big Ten Conference and
telling of the relation between Mich-
igan and Minnesota as Conference
teams also make their appearance in
the magazine.
A message of greeting by President
Marion L. Burton, and articles on foot-
ball spirit by Henry L. Williams, Uni-
versity of Minnesota football coach,
Coach Yost of Michigan, Ralph W.
Aigler of the Law school, and Al Cuth-
bert, '22E, Varsity cheerleader, all add
to the interest of the program.
NEW R.OTC BAND -HS
46 MEMBERS ENROLLED
Forty-six men make up the mem-
bership of the new R. O. T. C. band
which has recently been organized. Of
this number 26 have instruments and
Maj. Robert Arthur, professor of Dili-
itary science and tactics; is expect-
ing 28 more Instruments from the
government in the near future.
Tryouts may still apply for member-
ship, as there is need of several bass
horn players. Members of the. Uni-
versity, whether enrolled in the R. O.
T. C. or not, are eligible for this band,
as it is the purpose of the officers in
charge to use the band as trainng for
future members of the Varsity band.
There will be a drum majorchosen
shortly.
Capt. Wilfred Wilson, director of the

University band, is upervising the
work of the newly organized band and
it is expected that he will choose a
-member of the Varsity band to take
over his work with the R. 0. T. C.

French Composers Make Up Program
Of Yesterday 's Twilight Recital

i

... .

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I

ORATORICAL ASSOCIATION LECTURE COURSE
OPENS
TO-NIGHT
Charles Rann Kennedy and Edith Wynne Matthlson in Scenes from the Drama.
HILL AUDITORIUM-8 O'Clock
SINGLE ADMISSIONS $1.00. SEASON TICKETS AT CAMPUS BOOKSTORES. PRICES: $2.50 AND $3.00.

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