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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 17, 1921 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-11-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY TRURI

OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY
OF MICHIGAN
Published every morning except Monday during the Univer-
sity year by the Bard in Control of Student Publications.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Asociatd Press is exclusivel'entitled to the use for
republication of all news dispatches credited to it "r not oterwis
credited in this paper and the local news published therein.
Entered at the postoffioce at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
class matter.
Suoscription by carrier or mail, oj.o.
Offices: AnnnArbor Press building, Maynard Street.
Phones: Business, 96o; Editorial, 2414.
Communications not to exceed 300 words, if signed, the sig-
nature not necessarily to appear in print, but as an evidence of
faith, and notices of events will be published in The Daily at the
discretion of the Editor, if left at or mailed to The Dail office.
Unsigned communications will receive no consideration. No man-
uscript will be returned unless the writer incloses postage.
The Daily does not"necessarily endorse the sentiments ex-
pressed in the communications.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
MANAGING EDITOR .......... BREWSTER P. CAMPBELL
Assistant Managing Editor...............Hugh W. Hitchcock
City Editor .............................. E. P. Lovejoy Jr.
Night Editors-
R. E. AdamsG. P. Overton
Edward Lambrecht M. B. Stahl
Hughston McBain Paul Watzel
editorial Board Chairman.........................T. J. Whinery
Assistants-
S. T. Beach E. R. Meiss
L. A. Kern Leo Hershdorfer
Sunday Magazine Editor................Thornton W. Sargent, Jr.
ixchange Editor.................................George E. Sloan
Music Editor ..............................Sidney B. Coate
Sporting lEditr.............................George Reindel
Women's Editor .............................Elizabeth Vickery
Humor Editor ...........................---.E R.-Meis
Assistants
R. N. Byers L. I. Fenwick B. H. Lee
W. B. Butler H. B. Grundy . E. Mack
A. D. Clark Agnes Holmquist Kathrine Montgomery
Harry C. Clark H. E. Howlett R. C. Moriarity
. P. Comstock Marion Kerr R. B. Tarr
{ohn P. Dawson L. S. Kerr Virginia T onpl
..Donahue M. A. Kaver Dorothy ipple
W. F. Elliott Marion Koch L. L. Yot
J. B. Young
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
BUSINESS MANAGER ............. VERNON F. HILLERY
Advertising ........................F. M.'Heath, A. J. Parker
Publication .............................. Nathan W. Robertson
Accounts ............................... John J. Hamels, Jr.
Circulation............................... Herold C. Hunt
Assistants
Burr L. Robbins Richard Cutting H. Willis Heidbreder
W. Cooley James Prentiss W. Kenneth Galbraith
L. Beaumont Parks Maurice Moule J. A. Dryer
Walter Scherer a tn Goldring Richard Heidemann
Edw. Muran Tyler Stevens T. H. Wolfe
David Park Paul Blum
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 1921
Night Editor-HUGHSTON M. McBAIN
Assistant-Martin A. Klaver
Proofreaders-Robert M. Loeb, John
M. Bulkley
ORGANIZE THE CHEER LEADING
For some years Michigan's cheer leading has been
dependent largely upon one man. No inducement
was offered others to try out for the job; no com-
pensation, no uniform, and little honor was awarded
the successful candidate, and consequently few
trained men have felt it worth their while to seek
the position. At best, the cheer leader has a dif-
ficult place; he must be able and willing to fight,
and yet to meet all odds with a smile and a pleasant
word.
The one-man cheer leading system was all right
so long as we had small crowds on Ferry field.
But now, with attendance at the various big foot-
ball games averaging thirty-five or forty thousand
people, many of whom are alumni and strangers
who do not know the yells, one man simply is physi-
cally unable to handle the entire work.
Ohio State and one or two other Big Ten uni-
versities for some time have had a system of or-
ganized cheer leading in full operation and it has
apparently proved entirely successful. Now efforts
are being made in a rather small way to institute
some such scheme here at Michigan. At present
our cheer leaders get no awards. Furthermore, they
are asked to supply their own uniforms - and
whit; flannels cost money. They are asked to come

out regularly and to work as hard as anyone on
the field, to do this the year 'round, to endure all
kinds of complaining and "razzing" without losing
their tempers, and all this with no reward or posi-
tion whatever to which they may look forward.
It is about time cheer leading at Michigan were
put on an organized basis. It is about time that the
men who go out in front of the stands and lead the
yells, who ultimately have a big share in the win-
ning of an athletic contest, be giveusome kind of
recognition for their pains.'
One scheme which has been suggested would be
to have one Varsity cheer leader, a senior, ap-
pointed each year. Under him would be four as-
sistants, juniors, while sophomores who sought the
job would be considered solely as try-outs. The
Varsity man himself could then be awarded a
"c M L" in recognition for his services, while both
he and the four assistants could, and certainly should,
be furnished with complete uniforms of some sort.
Still another arrangement suggested would put the
Varsity cheer leader on exactly the same basis as
the manager of any athletic team.
For the purpose of choosing the best man for the
job each year, perhaps a committee of athletic man-
agers and members of the Student council might be
appointed, or some similar method for the selection
of men might be worked out. But certainly, what-
ever the method, some steps ought to be taken at
once to put cheer leading on a sound, recognized
and organized basis. To ask a man to furnish his
own outfit and then to come out day after day the
year round to wear it out leading cheers with no
hope of award is entirely too much. We are in dire
and immediate need of some definite cheer leading
scheme at Michigan..

.....

tl .. _.
r _

THE POPULAR MISCONCEPTION
Although a recognized student publication and
housed in the Press building with the other jour-
nalistic activities, the Michiganensian is confronted
with a number of problems peculiar to itself. Ow-
ing to the vast amount of work required in produc-
ing the year book, subscriptions for it must be taken
in the fall although the finished edition does not
appear until the following spring. In accordance
with this policy the Michigan annual is at present
waging its campaign for subscriptions.
The greatest single obstacle which each succes-
sive business adminstration of the Michiganensian
must overcome is the popular belief that the 'En-
sian is a senior publication. On the contrary, a
comparatively small portion of the book is given
over to the graduating class. The remainder de-
votes itself to the campus at large, activities, sports,
societies, classes, - in short every branch of Uni-
versity interest. It is a resume of the year's ac-
complishment, a register of the student personnel.
Its appeal is not exclusively or even largely to the
senior class, but to every member of Michigan who
has an active interest in his University and who de-
sires to carry out into the world with him the rec-
ord of his college years for a place in his library.
If one forgets to subscribe to Chimes or the Gar-
goyle he may purchase them at a news stand. The
Michiganensian is different. After tomorrow night
there will be no further opportunity to order a
copy. The 'Ensian takes months to make, but its
value is permanent and its content of unceasing in-
terest.
With the realization that this is a publication for
the entire campus - the first year man as well as
the senior - it behooves each member of the stu-
dent body to decide upon the purchase of a copy.
Having done so, sign up for it before the close of
the campaign tomorrow night.
THE Y. W. C. A. BUDGET
Today will mark the close of the University Y.
W. C. A. drive for this year's budget. In asking
for only three thousand dollars from the approxi-
mately two thousand women -on the campus this
service rendering organization is making a very
modest request, the granting of which should, in
most cases, involve no hardship to individual stu-
dents. Since in accordance with the campaign plan
no definite amount is fixed for contributions -
eyeryone being asked to subscribe only what she is
able --- each woman student of the University
should give something.
As the draft of the budget shows the work of the
campus Y. W. C. A. is carried on with a very ef-
ficient use of the funds donated. Besides its main
purpose of serving as a religious center for the
women of the campus, the organization performs
valuable welfare work such as giving assistance in
hospitals, working among foreign students, and
taking part in the program for assuring the poor
children of Ann Arbor something like a real
Christmas.
The teams which are raising the quota have them-
selves pledged more than a tenth of the amount re-
quired, while several hundred dollars have already
been given by the campus. Those who have to date
failed to make any contribution should remedy this
omission at once.
the Telescope
A Difference in Type
We were almost thrown
Into jail
Once,
And will never forget
How we argued
With the cop
To let us loose.
Next Saturday's football game
Is one of those peculiar instances
Where peple fight
Each other to their last
Ounce of energy
Just to

Get the jug.
Isn't this a strange word?
Whatever -differences may arise at the Disarma-
ment conference, it is gratifying to know that all,
the nations agree there should be peace.
Quoth Eppie Taf:
The shock o'erpowered
Herbert Kent,
His landlady
Reduced the rent.
- H. Blazes.
Among the Missing
A thorough perusal of all correspondence through
the Telescope has brought to light the regrettable
fact that such notables as D'Ing, Hugh Ronn, Ka-
nukk, Ivan Hoe, Steve, Jay Bee, Ermine, and Icha-
bod, have disappeared. Any information concern-
ing their whereabouts will be appreciatively re-
ceived.

j

Agents for the Roycrofters

GRAHAM'S
Both ends of the diagonal ivalk
1-

DETROIT UNITED LINES
Ann Arbor and Jackson
TIME TABLE
01 astern Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars--6.o5 a.
P., 7:05 a. in., 8:io a. in. and hourly to 9:10
p. m.
Jackson Express Cars (local stops of Ann
\rbor), 9:48 a. in. and every two hours to
9:48 p. In.
Local Cars East Bound-5:55 a.m., 7:oo a.
m. and every two hours to 9:oo p. in.,- ti :oo
p. m., To Ypsilanti only-i:4o p. M.. 12.25
a. m., rt: t5 a. m.
To Saline, change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars West Bound-7 :50 a. in., 2:40 p.
"'To Jackson and Kalamazoo-Limited cars:
8:48, 10:4a a. in., 12:48, 2 :48, 4:48.
To Jackson and Lansing-Limited: 8:48
in.
1921 NOVEMBER 1921
1 2 3 4 5
6 7 8 9 10 11 12
13 14 15 16 17 18 19
20 21 22 23 24 25 26
27 28 29 30
NOTICE TO MEN
We do all kinds of high-class Hal
work at pre-war prices. Hats turned
inlside out, with all new trimmings,
are as good as new.
FACTORY HAT STORE
617 PACKARD STREET
Telephone 1792

Daily Want Ads Pay.--Adv.
Patronize Daily Advertisers.-Adv.

Patronize our Advertisers.-Adv.
Try a Daily Want Ad. It pays.-Adv.

M,

.'U

O &H
MEN'S
SHOE SHOP
CAN YOU BEAT
THIS?
We are Offering
as a
Week - End
Special.

-

I

1

a black
gian

and brown Norwe-
grain Ball-strap
Oxford

at
$8.85
Thin Thompson Brogues
and formerly sold
at
$12.00
O'Kane & Hertler
335 South Main Street

fiJeat Ilinnesota'!
Then celebrate with
a drink or lunch at
Blighty
709 N. UNIVERSITY

Do't forget to
scription.-Adv.

pay your Daily sub-

I

s

r r - {

Our original
order for
CLASTOQUES.
1909==100 Dozen
Reprint from
Lansing Paper
December, 1909.
Wear a Toque Saturday
WAGNER & COMPANY
For Men Since 1848
STATE STREET A T LIBERTY)

CsU. F M1STUDENTS
WEARLANSING CAPS
LOCAL KNITTING PLANT WORK-
ING ON ORDER OF HUNDRED
DOZEN.
CARRIED BY MESSENGER
EXPRESS COMPANY NOT TRUST-
ED TO DELIVER NEW STYLE
HEAD GEAR:
Recently the students of the Uni-
versity of Michigan adopted a style of
caps - compulsory to freshmen-but
very much in vogue with the entire
student body. The Michigan Knitting
company of this city is making the
caps. The order Was for one hundred
dozen and already about two-thirds
of the order have been filled and deliv-
ered. An amusing feature of the de-
ivery of the caps is that the students,
not trusting an express company, re-
quire that a special messenger go
from the factory, as each ten .dozen
are completed, to Jackson, where a
special messenger from Ann Arbor
meets him, takes the goods and re-
turns to the University. The caps are
knitted, a coarse weave, and each class
has a different style.
The caps for the treshmen are of
gray with tassels of various colors,
representing the various departments.
The sophomore cap is of maroon with
a white stripe and maroon tassel. The
junior class cap is of blue with a
white stripe and a blue tassel and the
senior cap is 'of white. with, ablue
stripe and a white tassel.

Crash!I
They met but once at the crossing,
'Twas heard of near and far,
For one was a South-bound flivver
And the other an East-bound car.
. -Q. T.

Famous Closing Lines
"It's all off," sighed the bachelor as he rubbed
his shiny head. ERM,

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