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November 17, 1921 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-11-17

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THE WEATHER

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VOL. XXXII. No. 46
COUNCIL FAVORS
WEARING TOQUS
NEXT SAT-URDAY
ALSO ADVOCATES GENERAL WEAR.
ING OF THEM DURING WIN.
TER MONTHS
NEW STUDENTS ALL TO
WEAR FRESH INSIGNIA
Gives Vote of Thanks to Organizations
and Individuals Who Sent '25
Team on Trip
Wearing of the class toques by all
classes of the University at the Min-
nesota game and on all school days
thereafter during the winter months,
was heartily endorsed by the Student
council at their weekly meeting held
last night at the Union. This action
definitely fixes Saturday as official
Toque day.
The council went on. record as
adopting the following toque regula-
tions: Freshman, plain grey with
poms of departmental colors, which
are described in the "Freshman Bible";
sophomore, maroon body and porn with
white band-three inches from the top;
junior, white body and pom with navy
band three inches from top; senior,
navy body and pom with white band
three inches from top; post graduate,
top half of body navy, lower half of
body white with white poms.
Students on the campus are to con-
sider themselves as freshmen and to
wear the freshman toque until they
have spent two semesters here or have
received 24 hours of credit. Post grad-
uates, and others, who have worn the
four class toques or who have been
allowed their senior credits at the Un-
iversity, may wear the post graduate
toque.
A vote of thanks was passed by the.
council to all organizations and indi-
viduals who helped to send the fresh-
man team to Wisconsin. '"

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN,'
MICHIGAN - A BARRIER OF FLESH WHICH
REFUSED TO BE CRUSHED, A SPIRIT WHICH
REFUSED TO BE COWED - AT MADISON
-MILWAUKEE TELEGRAM.
In the Milwaukee Telegram the fol- describes the fight. Michigan fight and

lowing comments on the Michigan-Wis-
consin game are given:
Coach Yost and eleven blue jerseyed
tigers from Michigan cut short long
Jawn Richards' career of triumph at
Camp Randall last Saturday afternoon.
The Wolverine grappled the Badger
and it was a draw-a bitter, bitter
draw, which left the Wolverine happy
and the Badger disconsolate at the
close. A barrier of flesh which refused
to be crushed and a spirit which re-
fused to be cowed, that was Michigan
Saturday afternoon on its first invas-
ion of Badger confines in 16 years.
Bitterest Struggle
Camp Randall in all its days has wit-
nessed some bitter struggles and nerve
jarring battles, but there is none which
takes precedent over the meeting of
Saturday. Bitter is the only word that

Michigan spirit were a huge surprise
Saturday. No such opposition was ex-
pected from our 'neighbors across the
lake. But Yost had his eleven well
schooled and well drilled and to the
man they fought with a grim determin-
ation which is only characteristic of
collegiate-football and only comes to a
gridiron warrior fighting for the hon-
or of his Alma Mater.
"They Shall Not Pass"
"They shall not pass" was Michi-
gan's battle cry, and the Badgers,
strive as they would, could not negoti-
ate those few sacred yards of Michigan
territory which time and again inter-
vened between Wisconsin and victory.
Let it not be said that the Badgers did
not fight. They storve miglitly but
ever as they renewed the assault
Michigan's spirit would match them at
the crucial moment."

UNVEIL MEMORIAL TABLET SATURDAY
IN' HONOR OF, DEAD HERO ATHLETES

Ceremonies in Commemoration to
Conducted by President
of "M" Club

Be

5,

ife ?Iembers hip
lien-Dine Tuesday
Workers on the recent Union cam-
paign for life memberswill be enter-
tained next Tuesday night in the Union
assembly hall instead of tonight as an-
nounced last week, the date being
changed yesterday by. the campaign
committee. A special program of
speeches and music will follow the
banquet and the winning team for the
drive, captained by C. A. Campbell,
124E, will be given special recogni-
tion. E. C. Stark, Sch. of M., the sales-
man who had the highest individual
total of sales, will also be presented
with a silver loving cup.
A final tabulation of the figures for
the drive, completed at the Union yes-
terday, shows that 1,625 new life mem-
bers were added to the roster of the
Union as a result of the drive, this be-
ing 25 in excess of the quota.
CHOOSE MEMORIAL
DANCE CHAPERONS
Chaperons for the Veterans' Me-
morial dance Friday night in Barbour
gymnasium are Dr. Hugh M. Beebe
and Mrs. Beebe, Dr. Dean W. Myers
and Mrs. Myers, and Dr. Louis-P. Hall
and Mrs. Hall.
The chaperons for the dance Satur-
day night are Dr. John Sundwall and
Mrs. Sundwall, Maj. Robert Arthur
and Mrs. Arthur, and Prof. F. H. Stev-
ens and Mrs. Stevens.
In an interview late Wednesday aft-
ernoon Harry H. Archer, '22, chair-
man of the memorial committee ar-
ranging the dance, stated that his
committee was well satisfied with the
sale of the tickets. About 50 tickets
remain unsold for Saturday and about
75 for Friday night.
The features of both dances will be
a moonlight scenic dance, the Dar-
ling quartette, ard novelty dances
with favors for both women and men.
Band to lead Sophs to Games
In order to organize a band to lead
the sophomore class to the games Sat-
urday at Ferry field, all sophomores
who were members of last year's
freshman band are urged to be pres-
ent at a rehearsal at 7:30 o'clock to-
night in room 205 Mason hall.

MICHIGAN LETTER MEN GIVE
FUNDS FOR FITTING PLAQUE
Four. Michigan athletes who gave
their lives for their country during
the late war will be honored at the
unveiling of the memorial tablet at
Ferry field Saturday. Maj. James K.
Watkins, president of the "M" club,
will have charge of the ceremonies
which will be held before the opening
of the Minnesota game.
The tablet is of bronze, and fully in
keeping with its purpose as a per-
manent memorial to the four "M" men
who made the supreme sacrifice for
their country. On it appears an ea-
UNION N9ffLISTING
ROOMS FOR WEEKEND
LANDLADIES ASKED TO NOTIFY
COMMITTEE OF AVAILABLE
SPACE
Rooms for the accommodation of
visitors in Ann Arbor over the week-
end of the Minnesota game are be-
ing listed this week by'the Union
housing committee in the lobby of the
Union.' Anyone having rooms availa-
ble for use either Friday or Saturday
night is requested by the committee
to notify it as soon as possible, as re-
quests for accommodations have been
coming in for the past three weeks
and must be tabulated as soon as pos-
sible.
Office hours during which the in-
formation will be received at the
Union are from 1 to 5 o'clock every
afternoon this week. Landladies 'can
phone in the necessary information or
can write to the committee in care
of Philip J. Schneider, '24.
Students can secure rooms for vis-
itors over the week-end by applying
this afternoon at the Union desk, Aft-
er today all accommodations will be
reserved for visiting alumni direct, as
it is the aim of the Union to provide
for all those that apply before game
time Saturday.
Teacher Registration Shows Gain
Three hundred and ten prospective
teachers registered at the bureau of
appointments before it closed Monday
evening. The figure represents an in-
crease of 50 over that of last year,
while 100 more are expected to regis-
ter before the end of the year. Appli-
cations for teachers' positions will not
come in until the beginning of next
semester.
Lindsay Reaches Swedish University
Prof. George A. Lindsay, of the phys-
ics department, who was granted a
leave of absence for the year 1921-1922
for special research work in the Uni-
versity of Lund, Sweden, has sent word
of his arrival at his destination. Pro-
fessor Lindsay is expected to continue
his work at Michigan next year.

gle, mounted on a block "M" and bear-
ing in its talons a furled American
flag. Under the eagle is the inscrip-
tion, "In Honor of the 'M' Men of the
University of Michigan Who Gave
Their Lives for Their Country in the
World War." Then follow the names
of the hero athletes: Curtis G. Red-
den, '04, Howard R. Smith,. '12, Otto
Carpell, '13, and Efton James, '15.
Beneath the names are the words of
eulogy, "Not Dead; But Living in
Deeds. Such Lives Inspire."
Redden was a member of the Var-
sity football and baseball teams dur-
ing the time he was in school. During
the war he was a lieutenant colonel
of the 149th field artillery. He died
in Germany after a brilliant career
and a recommendation for promotion
to the rank of brigadier general.
Smith, while at the University, was a
brilliant pitcher on the Varsity nine.
After becoming a lieutenant in the
aviation corps, he was killed in an
aeroplane accident in England. Car-
pell, one of Yost's halfbacks during
1911 and 1912, was also an aviator. He
died of heart failure following influ-
enza while in the South. James, first
lieutenant of infantry, was killed in
action in the Verdun sectorkOct. 14,
1918. He was a football man, playing
end during the season of 1914.
The plaque, bought from funds sub-
scribed by the "M" club, will be plac-
ed temporarily in front of the club
house at Ferry field, where it will
remain, until Michigan's new stadium
and club house are built, at which
time it will be permanently located in
the wall of the trophy room.
"M" men present at the game Sat-
urday are requested to meet at the
ffag pole at 1:30 o'clock in order to
participate in the unveiling.-
Journalist Tells
Of Feature Work
V. V. McNitt, ex-'02, addressed Prof.
John L. Brumm's journalism classes
yesterday ;morning, presefting vari-
ous phases of the newspaper profes-
sion, with which he is intimately fa-
miliar, having advanced in a few
years from printer's "devil" to his
presen capacity as head of two large
news feature services in New York.
"Don't be discouraged when you
write something good and no one
seems to notice it," said Mr. McNitt
to the class in feature writing.
"Sooner or later some of the 'pow-
ers' will see your work and your re-
ward will be forthcoming."
After relating the stories of the ca-
reers of several noted writers, Mr.
McNitt concluded, "Aim high, but
don't be afraid to start at the bottom.
Brilliancy and a knack for writing
will get one nowhere without consht-
ent hard work."
Paris Professor to Lecture Here
Charles Cestre, professor of Amer-
ican Literature and Civilization at the
University of Paris, will deliver six
lectures at the University during the
week beginning April 24, 1922, on the
general subject, "The Contribution
of France to the Universal Ideals of
Mankind."

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 1921
RECITAL BEGINS
LECTURE COURSE
Charles Rann Kennedy with Edith
Wynhe Matthlson (Kennedy)
Artists on Program
BOTH STAND HIGH IN STAGE
AND INTERPRETATIVE WORLD
With a joint recital of scenes from
standard dramas, Charles Rann Ken-
nedy, author of "The Servant in the
House", and Edith Wynne Matthison
(Kennedy) will open the course of en-
tertainments given under the auspices
of the University Oratorical associa-
tion at 8 o'clock tomorrow night in
Hill auditorium.
Mr. Kennedy, according to Prof. R.
D. Hollister, of the public speaking
department, has given us some of our
finest modern plays. "His 'Servant in
the House' and 'The Terrible Meek'
have made a profound impression up-
on both the reading and the play-go-
ing public."
Mrs. Kennedy, who played the lead
opposite Sir Henry Irving, was
the creator of "Everyman", a morali-
ty play, and played the title role in
University Hall some years ago. She
also appeared in Ann Arbor in 1908,
playing the role of "Auntie" in "The
Servant in the House.
Romance Tin ges
Air OIf Players
Club Production
(By Lillian Scher)
Romance was in the air at the per-
formance of the Players club last eve-
ning at Sarah Caswell Angell hall.
The "caller" of the "Lost Silk Hat"
regained his romance with his hat -
albeit at the sacrifice of his beauti-
ful doom, and the girl "Maud" in the
"Florist Shop" created her own ro-
mance and that of the two long-en-
gaged lovers, Miss Wells, an Mr.
Jackson.
The honors of the evening belong to
Amy Loomis, '22, who was decidedly
the kind sentimental maid of the
"Flower Shop,' and whose clever
portrayal of the role was keenly ap-
preciated by the audience. Devera
Steinberg, '22, as Miss Wells, and
Ralph Johnson, '23, as Mr. Jackson
were decidedly pleasing, and William
Randall, grad., played the temper-
mental poet of the "Lost Silk Hat"
with clever interpretation.
RED CROSS STARTS FIRST DAY
ACTIVE DRIVE FOR MEMBERS
With the opening of its house to
house canvas yesterday the local
chapter of the Red Cross began the
first day of its active drive for mem-
bers. The campus drive began yester-
day and will continue for the rest of
the week. The membership fee is the
usual annual fee of $4 Half the pro-
ceeds from the local campaign go to
the national organization for its work
and the other half is kept for work in
Ann Arbor.
GARGOYLE SMASHES PREVIOUS
SALES RECORDS; SELLS 4,000
All previous sales records were
smashed by 1,000 when the November
issue of the Gargoyle totalling 4,000
copies was practically disposed of on

Tuesday. The remaining copies of the
Football Number, with the exception
of a few copies which will be sold for
the benefit of the returning alumni on
the campus Saturday, have been
placed on sale at various book stores
and news stands in the city.
Graduates to Meet Every Monday
Blue Monday is a thing of the past
for graduate women. At 4 o'clock
every Monday afternoon in Barbour
gymnasium the Graduate Women's
club serves tea to its members and
friends. Plans for contributing to the
women's building are now under con-
sideration and the club is planning a
booth for the bazaar.
Brazilian Expedition Leaves Dec. 15
R. B. Williamson, one of the honor-
ary curators of the museum, has or-
ganized an expedition for the purpose
of searching the interior of Brazil for
specimens of dragon flies, both for his
own collection and for the museum.
The expedition will sail Dec. 15, and
it will not return until satisfactory dis-
coveries are made.

MICHIGAN ENSIAN
DRIVE TOTAL 75

PRICE FIVE CE
WHAT WOULD YOU LIKE
TO READ IN THE DAILY?
What would you like to read
In The Daily?. The length of
the grotto at the ave of thennA

At End of Third Day Last Year 1,194
Subscriptions Were
Signed
SEGALL, '24, SECURES MOST
ORDERS; FORSYTHE '23, NEXT
Three days of campaigning for sub-
scriptions to the 1922 Michiganensian
have netted a total of 751 orders. Yes-
terday's sales, amounting to 302, ex-
ceeded those made on either of the.
other two days.
During the first three days of last
year's drive 1,194 subscriptions were
obtained as compared with the 751
this. year. The third day alone last
year brought in 393 orders.
The salespeople getting the largest
number of subscriptions yesterday
were Bernard Segall, '24, with 40;
Elizabeth Forsythe, '23, with 31, and
Barbara Wagner, '22, with 24.
The book will be worked out in
a sympony of browns this year,
according to the editors. The color
of the paper will be changed from
white to an ivory tinted sepia, while
the pages will be the 'same color
throughout 'with the exception of light;
brown insert sheets used to head the,
sections. The editors declare that
they intend to harmonize the book so;
that there will not be any foreign
colors to jar the reader.
"I believe that the book has pre-
viously reached perfection in almost
every line but art of colors, and we
are going to try and work that out
this year," said James Frey, '22,
managing editor.
A statement was issued by the
Michiganensian office yesterday aft-
ernoon that there would be absolute-
ly no extension of time on the sen-
for pictures. The statement declares
that 90 per cent of the seniors have
already had theirdpictures taken and
that it is not deemed necessary to
make any time extension as has been
given in past years.
YoW1 DIVE TOTAL $110
End of First Day Sees White Team in
Lead with $577
At the end of the Y. W. -C. A. cam-
paign's first day, the white team led
with a pledge of $577. The red team's
efforts netted them $340.50, and the
blue's $293.20, giving a total of $1,-
210.70.
These team reports were announc-
ed last night at the finish of the wed-
ding ceremony uniting Miss Y. W. C. A.
and Mr. Budget, which was solemnized
at 7:30 o'clock at Newberry hall. The
members of the wedding party were as
follows: Minister, Martha Dodd, '23;
bride, Constance Smith, '24; groom,
Katherine Riggs, '24; mother, Helen
Schermerhorn, '23; vesper service,
Thelma Smith, '25; girl reserve, Sarah
Randal, '24; Lake Geneva, Margaret
Ann Keegan, '24; hospital service,
Joana Holbrook, '25; social service,
Catherine Livingstone, '25.
Architects Hold Meetings
Sophomore and freshman architec-
tural clases held short business
meetings yesterday afternoon.

WindsT What a silk worm lives
on? Or what becomes of the
empty paste pots in a newspaper
office?
Does The Daily contain news,
of a constant variety, or features,
or departments to which you turn
with especial anxiety?
Seriously, though,- the critical
minds of a college world are In.
genously diversified. It is some.
thing of a problem to cater to
such an imposing clentele.
Which brings the proposition of
immediate concern to the front?
What would you like to read in
The Dally? Mail your sugges-
tions to: The City Desk. Mich-
igan Daily, Ann Arbor, Michigan.

run PALL bRMI

SC.

H. DALY, '22L, IN CHARGE
MEETING; WILL INSTRUCT
OFFICERS

1

KIPKE, '24, ANNOUNCES
CAPTAINS, LIEUTENANTS
Flag Rush and Cane Spree to B
Chief Contests; Rules Are
Explained
Sophomores will appear in force a
7 o'clock tonight in the Natural Soi.
ence auditorium, where they will b
addressed by their captains and lieu-
tenants and plans drawn up for the
Fall games Saturday. C. H. Daly
'22L, of the Student council, will be
in charge of the meeting and will n-
struct the officers of the games
Archie MacDonald, '22L, will speak
and cheerleaders will be present t
bring out the spirit of the class of '24
Captains and lieutenants of the
sophomore class for the games were
appointed today by Harry G. Kipke
president of the class, as follows: 01
the engineers, M. B. Parsons, captain
and C. R. Webb, F. S. Kratz, C. A
Ross, C. L. Hulswit, and J. P. Sutter
lieutenants; of the lits, E. E. Murane
captain, and W. Weeks, A. B. Mc-
Wood, L. B. Lawton, H. McGraph, and
C. o. Creal, lieutenants.
As yet the freshman class has not
appointed its captains and lieutenants
but they will be named before the
freshman pep meeting which will be
held at 7 o'clock tomorrow night in
Natural Science auditorium.
The games this year will consist
of the Flag Rush and the Cane spree
They will be held at 10 o'clock shar
Saturday morning at Ferry field. The
Cane Spree will be the first event
and will be fought by 20 picked me
from each class. At the close of the
event, which will count one point, the
class having the most canes in its pos-
session wins. This will be followed
by the Falg Rush. The freshman
class will surround the poles and the
sophomores will endeavor to take
down the flags. Three minute periods
with five minute intermissions will be
allowed for this event, and at the
close all flags remainng on the poles
will count two for the freshmen and
all taken off count two for the sopho-
mores.
DRUID INITIATION
SCHEDULED TODAY
Druids, senior literary honorary so-
ciety, will hold its fall initiation at 4
o'clock this afternoon. Following
ceremonies in the sacred oak grove,
the secrets of the society will be ex-
plained to the new men at the Druid
room in the Union tower. Members
and neophytes will then attend a ban-
quet at the Union.
LIFE MEMBERS NOW
HAVE PRECEDENCE
FOR OPERA TICKETS
Full paid life members of the
Unionwere mailed application blanks
for tickets for "Make It for Two'
yesterday. They now have prece-
dence for seats, cast, chorus and com-
mittee members having been give:
the customary two days in which tc
file their preferenees. Full paid life
members will give way to participat-
ing life members tomorrow, when the
latter will be sent application blanks
No night of the week of Dec. 5
when the show plays in Ann Arbo
has been set aside for an "evening
clothes" affair. The Union has neve
officially authorized such a proced.
ure. However, if the custom of for
mer years is followed by students
Friday night, Dec. 9, will become for.
mal night.

Officials are encouraging groups o'
students to attend the opera in bod
les. Although each student can or
der only four tickets, the return en-
velopes of a number of students can
be enclosed in one larger envelope
and a block of seats will be issued
accordingly.
Subscriptions from alumni and Ani
Arbor merchants largely supported
the Athletic association in '99.

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