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September 30, 1921 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-09-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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>FFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY
i OF MICHIGAN
lished every morning except Monday during the Univer-
r by th4 Board in Control of Student Publications.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS'
YAssoiated Press is exclusively entitled to the use for
Ation of'all news dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
in this paper and the local news published therein.
etred at the postoffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
after. ,
tscription by carrier or mail, $3.5.
tcats:Ann Arbor Press building, Maynard Street.
mnes: Business, 960; Editorial, 2414.
amnunications not to exceed 300 words, if signed, the sig-
1t necessarily to appear in print, but as an evidencetof
id notices of events will be published in The Daily at the,
i of the 'Editor, if left at or mnailed to The Daily office.
4 comun ications will receive no consideration. No an
wil "be returned unless the writer incloss postage.
s Daily 'does not"necessarily endorse the sentiments ex-
hat's Ging O " notices will not be received after 6 o'clock
evening preceding insertion.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414:
tING EDITOR.BREWSTER P. CAMPBELL
itMaaging Editor................Hugh w. Hitchcock
itr ,+"............................. . P. Lovejoy, Jr.
E tors-
. Stahl - G. P. Overton
R .Adams Hughsto McBain
'Paul Watzel lEwr abeh
P. H. McPike E
.ls..T. J. Whinery, L. A. Kern, S. T. Beach, E. R. Meiss
ent Editors.................T. S. Sargent, T. H. Adams
w Editor............ .................George Reindel
's Editor............................Elizabeth Vickery
Ed tor ............ ........................E R. Meiss
Assistants
ry B. Grundy John Dawson Ben H. Lee, Jr.
lace F. Elliott Sidney B. Coates Julian Mack
A. Klaver Lowell S. Kerr Howard Donahue
Iter Donnelly H. E. Howlett Arnold Fleig
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
ESS MANAGER ............. VERNON F. HILLERY
ing............. ......F. M. Heath, A. J. Parker
o... . .....Nathan W. Robertson
ks..................John . Hamels, Jr.
on ................................Herold C. Hunt
Assistants
H. Willis HeidbredesrstTsler Stevens
Walter K. Scherer Martin Goldring
W. Cooley L. B Parks
sons 'wishing. to secure information concerning news for
e of The Daily should see the night editor, who has full
>f all news to be printed that night.
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 1921
Night Editor-H. M. McBAIN
'rM will be a meeting of all try-outs for The
Editorial staff at 4:15 o'clock this afternoon.
THE GRQWING PAINS CEASE
iough first reports indicated the possibility of
rrmous increase in the enrollment at Michigan
ar, the predictions proved to be ungrounded,
dly 7,931 students had signed on the Univer-
egiste' when classes opened Tuesday.
those who hanker -after mere numbers, to
whom nothing sounds forth the name of
fan so loudly and beautifully as an over-
ing enrollment, the actual decrease in our
Ris past year may be somewhat of a disap-
lent. We had expected a total yearly student
twelve thousand, whereas it will probably be
>ver ten.
:hose, however, who have the real good of the
rsity at heart and who seek quality first and
:rs la t, the change undoubtedly will come as
r pleasureable shock. Michigan has been
ag with such enormous strides during the
ew years that many have felt in the not-far-
t past that she was running away with her-
It has been feared, openly and otherwise, that
as gaining students.faster than she could take
f them, faster than she could give them the
mnefits of a fully adequate university equip-
and on the whole so rapidly that the students
lves were fast Alosing something of what we
o long enjoyed calling by the old name of
igan spirit."
year, however, our facilities are being much
sed,'through the addition of several members
faculty and through plans for a large num-
new and highly-niodern buildings. In the
re have been threatned by "sizetis," but now,
slight return to something of a more normal

nent and with marked changes for the better
made in our teaching staff and University
nent, we perhaps stand a chance of avoiding
ind for all the old bug-bear of overgrowth
getting down on our old foundation of ex-
,e.
fact that Michigan in 1921-1922 may not
s many students as she did the year preceding
no sense a reflection upon her. It merely
that she is finally coming down to earth after
usual conditions brought on by the war. After
at we most want and need is quality - not
ty.
TRADITIONS
le all universities have a common airm -
ional advancement - still there exists :an
.t in each which differentiates one such in-
n from another as pointedly perhaps as the
sity may be distinguished from the humdrum
es of outside life. Little ceremonies, insig-
t in themselves, which were originally in-
ted by our ancestral colleagues, and perpet-
by their successors, have come down to the
: day with a force and color so intensified by
years of observance that their life bids fair
>lve the heart of University spirit, and their
lance to mark the interest of the student body
niversity which is uniquely Michigan.
iout these ceremonies, landmarks, and cus-
n alumnus might experience an equal pleas-

ure in Visiting another university as in returning to
his own Alma Mater, provided that he cares to see
one at all. Spirit is the core of University alle-
giance; and spirit is engendered not merely through
four years of residence at Ann Arbor, but through
a full knowledge of and a wholehearted respect for
the traditions which have come down to us from
preceding generations of college men.
Tonight the Student council has arranged for an
assembly of the student body, the fourth annual
one of its kind, in Hill auditorium, where newcom-
ers to the University will be told and the old-tim-
ers refreshed upon the traditions of our campus.
Traditions are vital to Michigan. If it is the will
of the present student body to preserve Michigan
as distinctly herself, a university of character, Hill
auditorium should be packed to the doors this
evening.
FRESHMAN FIZZLES
Above this University hangs a cloud, full of
warning. To the unitiated and non-observant it
lacks meaning. Partially they may sense it, but
they have no acute consciousness of its being. It
evolves in a definite shape, and with a pointed mean-
ing - similar to the handwriting on the wall - to
those who will observe. It says - Freshman!
Don't Fizzle.
Don't fizzle out, by being a non-entity. If you
must be stupid, be so bad that you're noticeable.
Don't start a cross-draft by bolting and cutting to
play golf - even of the intriguing foreign variety.
You'll go out. Don't blow yourself out by trying to
do everything too hard. Be as natural and easy
as you can, too much oxygen is as bad for a deli-
cate flame as a lack of it. And though you shrink
from the admission, you are all pretty delicate
flames.-
Don't be spineless, get up and reserve sufficient
pressure to keep going against the little puffs of
wind that come along, such as mere initiations, fool
upper classmen, young and arrogant instructors and
the like.
Try to keep going steadily, no dragon-eyed hob-
goblin is going to arise from the earth and sud-
denly extinguish you.
'They All Fizzle Before They Go Out." -
Ergo - Don't Fizzle, Freshman!
? REGULATION OF LABOR SUPPLY
? With the normal average number of unemployed
workers in the United States placed 'at approxi-
mately one million, the latest official estimate of
5,700,000 ablebodied persons out of work is a
matter of grave concern to all thoughtful citizens.
The situation is more damaging than even the start-
ling comparison of figures would suggest, for the
normal million includes a large number of the
shiftless and unfit, whereas the present condition
includes experienced labor existing in an unprodiic-
tive state. This labor situation, suddenly becoming
serious enough to permit such demonstrations as
the "auction block" scenes in Boston, has become
the subject of special treatment by municipal, state,.
and federal authorities, but it was the last resort
when President Harding was appealed to and he in
turn appointed a special commission to investi-
gate.
It is the aim of this special commission to inaug-
urate an emergency program for immediate re-
lief, which might even include a federal employ-
ment bureau to work in conjunction with state and
local agencies. But in addition the work of the
commission should be to devise ,means for pre-
venting such an extreme situation to exist in the
future. The present opportunity to take steps in .
that direction should not be overlooked.
The Telescope
A Colorful Rhyme
She sure would be a pippin,
Now these are solid facts,
But she's pail from workin a paint-shop,

And paint is what shellacs.
It sounds paradoxical, but it's an absolute fact
that nowadays to get in with one of the opposite sex.
you have to take her out.
Quoth Eppie Taf:
Here lie the bones
Of Peter Klaut,
He didn't die,
Just petered out.
How to Find West Hall
Advice to Freshman series.
Go up to each building on the campus and give
it a shove; and the one that wiggles, -- that's West
hall.
Where, Oh Where!
Vacation time is o'er, and of
This weary college term a
Half a week has passed, still Erm
Has not yet heard from Erma.
Dear Erm:-
A friend of mine claims he can always see both
sides of a thing. Don't you think him broad-
tminded? Baron Top.
Dear Baron:-- Perhaps, but look and see if he
isn't a bit cross-eyed.
Famous Closing Lines
"What terrible cloth," said she as it ripped be-
tween her fingers. ERM.

'I..

A complete line of textbooks and supplies

for all colleges at both stores

GRAHAM
ith ends of the diagonal bsalk

,I,

DETROIT UNITED LINES
Ann Arbor and Jackson
TIME TABLE
(Eastern Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars--6.o5 a.
in., 7:05 a. i., 8:roa. m. and hourly to 9:10
P. M.
Jackson Express Cars (local stops of Ann
Arbor), 9:48 a. m. and every two hours to
9: 48 p. m.
Local'Cars East Bound-s.:55 a.m., 7:00 a.
m. and every two hours, to 9:oo p. m., xi:oo
p. m. To Ypsilanti only-x :40 p. m., 12.25
a. m., 1:1i5 a. M.
To Saline, change at Ypsilanti. .
Local Cars West Baund-7 :5o a. in., z :40 p.
m.
To Jackson and Kalamazoo-Limited cars:
8:48, xo:49 a. m., 12:48, 2:48, 4:48.
T. Jackson and Lansing-Limited: 8:48
p. m.

Im

Black Scotch

Grain

Walk-Over is sponsor for
the current vogue of black
shoes for well-dressed men.
Claridge
10 TO $12
:.. .:*

s 'I
A

1921
S

4
11
18
25

SEPTEMBER
M T W T
1
5 9 7 8
12 18 14 15
19 20 21 22
26 27 28 29

F
2
9
16
23
30

1921
S
3
10
17
24

$1

I

NOTICE TO MEN
We do all kinds of high-class Hat
work at pro-war prices. Hats turned
inside out, with all new trmings,'
are as good as new.
FACTORY HAT STORE
617 PACKARD STREET
Telephone 1792

i
TRAOC #40M
alMU16
wR.ors

R. J. HOFFSTETTER'
115 South Main Street

,
y, , . r ,

- C
!
I Wl
S
I M
Y!.C
!
!Y
5O

MORROW

Is the Day the City

. W

"C

A

AFETERI'A ,
Open Its Doors to Both
n -and Women

A. superior Home Cooking
i. C. A. Low Prices

8-510 EAST WILLIAM STREET

.

Y of r
QQ'

Casting some light
on the subject---

_:
- r

200 E. Washington
Telephone 273

HE student lamps you buy
T here are designed for that
one purpose - of giving you the
right kind of light for your work.
Everyone agrees that they are
marked at prices students like
to pay.

Need any of these: Double arxd triple
sockets, extension cords and fixtures?

Washtenaw Electric Shop
calvert Il. Wardwell, Manager

0.

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