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September 30, 1921 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-09-30

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5. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 1921

N EWBERRY
ST REPORTS
By SENATE

RANKS SPLIT
Y AND MINORITY
COUNTS

BYI

ASSITANT CHEER
LEADERS WANTED,
Tryouts for assistant cheer leaders
are wanted. A team of eight or ten
men will be picked after the first two
games by A. 0. Cuthbert, '22E, official
cheer leader.
Tryouts should report at the club
house on Ferry field in white uniforms
at 2:30 o'clock Saturday afternoon.
There is plenty of room for live wires
this year and the men who can deliv-
er the goods will be given an oppor-
tunity. A. 0. Cuthbert, '22E, says that
he is looking for men with ability to
create some new Michigan yells.
DEAN1ATESOUTLINES-
LAW. WORK TO NEW MEN!
FRESHMEN TOLD OF REQUIRE-
MENTS FOR SUCCESS IN
LEGAL INSTITUTION

ONS COMMITTEE
)R T COMMODORE

gresslves Said to Be Numbered
Among Those Opposed to
Seating Senator
'ashlngton, Sept. 29. - The Ford-
berry contest, over the 1918 sen-
ial election in Michigan, was sub-.
ed for decision today to the sen-
in majority and minority reports
1 the privileges and elections
mittees, which heard the contest.
Majority Favor Newberry
he majority report absolved Sen-
.Newberry from charges of hav-
violated the corrupt practices act
)ugh undue expenditures in the
paign, while the minority report
sted thatthe expendituerstcould
have been miade without his
wledge. It remains for the senate
rote on the question of whether
ator Newberry will be seated,
z the prospect that several weeks
elapse before the final decision.
he majority report was presented
Senator Spencer, Republican, Mis-
ri, on behalf of the Republicans
;he committee. Several Republi-
senators, however, have indicat-
n intention to vote agaist seating
ator Newberry.
bout a half dozen of the so-call-
'Progressive" Republicans were
to be numbered among the op-
tion, but party leaders have stated
rs convictions that the contest'
Id end with adoption of the ma-
ty recommendation.
SHOWS TOTAL 'F 3,340

BALLOTS SHOW ME-N
FAVOR RAIL STRIKE
TIT
Fifty-seven General Chairmen of
Brotherhood Ieave Chicago
on Walkout
NINETY PER CENT OPPOSE
ACCEPTANCE OF WAGE CUT
Chicago, Sept. 29.-Fifty-seven gen-
eral chairmen of the Brotherhood of
Railway Trainmen will leave Chicago
tonight, carrying instructions from
President W. G." Lee to call their
grievance ,commfttees, immediately
obtain their sanction or disapproval
of the strike vote of the organization
a~d report back to the. president here
next week.
Chicago, Sept. 29. - While count-'
ing of the strike ballots of 186,000
members of the Brotherhood of Rail-,
way Trainmen, will npt be completed
until late today, there seemed no
doubt in the minds of union officials-
today as to how the men stood.
Unofficial reports were that 90
,per cent of those voting were oppos-
ed to acceptance of the wage cut of
July 1. Notwithstanding this attitude
on the part of the men, it was stated
a strike was in no wise certain. The
general committees will decide' on a
strike and they are not bound to
abide by the vote of the members.
,E.
TEACHERS OUTLINE NEW DIVIS-
ION OF ORGANIZATION INTO
FIVE DISTRICTS

STUDENTS SWAMP
BUREAU FOR WORK
"Requests for jobs of all kinds have
far surpassed the demand," said Mrs.
Mary L. Stewart, in charge of the stu-
dent employment bureau at the Uni-
versity. In order to help alleviate this
demand, which Mrs. Stewart thinks is
caused by many students not making
as much during the past summer as
usual, it is asked that everyone hav-
ing work of any description please
call University and ask for student
employment.
VARSITY BND TRYOUTS
COMPETE FOR POSITIONS
MUSICIANS FAVOR TRIP TO MAD.
ISON INSTEAD OF URBANA
VAUNT

CALL SATURDAY GAME
AT 9:00 LOCAL TIME
Football games will start
promptly at 2 o'clock, Central
standard time, throughout the
year, according to officials in
charge of the contests.
Because of the daylight saving
plan, which will be in effect until
the last of October, the game
Saturday with Mt. Union college,
and the other games throughout
the month will begin at g o'clock,
local time.
The'games are started by Stan-
dard time dine to the fact that
train schedules are arranged by
it and less confusioi Is caused
those who come from other
cities.

"COME EARLY" WARN
TEE IN EXPECTA
OVERFLOW AUD
ANGUS G. GOET2
CHOSEN TO

Prof. R. M. Wenley
Faculty; Alum
* sed on 1

FOURTH ANNUAL TRADITIONSIAS
WILL LEARN MlCHIGAN Cl

Dean Henry M. Bates, of' the Law,
school, gave his annual talk to the
first year men in the Law school yes-
terday afternoon, speaking of the va-
rious new problems that they would
meet and ways to solve them.
He explained the rules for attend-
ance in the Law school as being nec-
essary, due to the requirement of most
state laws governing admission to the
bar which require that the candizate'
be certified as having attended "reg-
ularly" a recognized law school.
He also explained the efforts of:
the school to finid a fair plan of
gauging legal ability, resulting in the
present system, which was only put
into use after exhaustive tests ex-
tending over a period of three years.
Dean Bates explained carefully
that he was not "against" athletics or
outside activities but that the first
duty of the law student is toward his
work andthat his law studies should
occupy first place in his efforts.
In conclusion he briefly mentioned
the prominent pllace occupied by the
University of Michigan Law school in
the legal profession, sayin that it
was t he ambition of the faculty not
to turn out mechanical lawyerz who
culd slip into the shoes of older
men, but m'dn and women able to take
up the work where the older genera-
tion left off and to improve and adapt!
'our laws to present day conditions
and demands. f

With many more men responding to
the call for try-outs than can be fit-
ted with uniforms, the Varsity band
inaugurated its year with a rehearsal
in University'Hall Wednesday night.

However, the try-outs have not com-
pletely filled the vacant places and
there are still opportunities for good
musicians.
During the evening plans were dis-
cussed for making the band a social
as well at a musical organization.
Tentative arrangements are being
made for smokers and get together
meetings during the coming winter.
The majority of the band men vot-
-ed in favor of accompanying the foot-
ball team to Madison, Wis., on Nov.
12, instead of going to Urbana, Ill.,
on Oct. 29. As yet nothing definite
is known either way but one of the
two trips is assured. The Band
Bounce will be given in Hill audi-
torium a week before the game decid-
ed upon. The. band will be on hand
for the Traditions meeting at Hill
auditorium tonight as well as for the'
Mt. Union-Michigan game Saturday
afternoon.
S20 ENGINEERS GT 'S"

istrations ., for membership in
ichigan Union last night reach-
total of 3,340, after the receipt
3 applications during the day.
filce of the registration cosmit-
n the lobby of the Union, has
open morning and afternoon
the opening of the fall term,,
he figures are more than 500 be-
hose at this time last year.
students securing membership
are requested by the Union to
it blanks stating any special
in dramatics, music, or other
nt activities, to be used in the
of the recording secretary for
reference. All members, -in-
ag upperclassmen, are urged to
their index cards as complete.
issible, because of their impor-
in aiding many activities to line
nmpus talent.
nbers of the registration con-
e will be in the Union lobby at
ar -hours: from 2 to 5 o'clock
afternoon, from 10 to 12 o'clock
'row morning, and from 2 to 5
k every afternon next week.
0 Students in Redical Sebool
h figures practically complete
Medical school enrollment
nts to more than 550 students.,
y 225 are freshmen.

Plans for the extension -6f the work
of the Michigan State Teachers' asso-
ciation were laid at a meeting of the
committee on reorganization of the
association which was held at-2 o'clock
yesterday afternoon in room 302 of
the Union.
"The organization is at present too
large to carry on its work effectively,
due to the difficulty of getting in touch
with the educators in the different
parts of the state," according to E. L.
Miller of Detroit, chairman of the com-
mittee.. Mr. Miller explained how it
was planned to divide the association
up into five divisions each of which
would be complete in itself and would
elect officers to represent it at a cen-
tral convention where' all business-
would be transacted. This plan has
been tried with great success in Cal-
ifornia, Nebrask, Illinois, and several
other states, it was §tated.
ALPHA BETA PHI AFFILIATES
WITH NATIONAL 'FRATERNITy

HARLAND CHOSEN I
AS SUCCESSOR TO-
GREEK PROFESSOR
Dr. James Penrose Harland has
been appointed to the faculty of the
Greek department to succeed Prof.:
Frank Egleston Robbins, who is the
new assistant to President Marion L.
Burton.
Dr. Harland is a graduate of Prince-
ton of the claps of 1913. After spend-
ing some time traveling in Europe, he
returned to Princeton, receiving his
Ph.D. degree there in 1920. The fol-
lowing year he held a fellowship in
the American School of Classical
Studies in Athens. While connected
with this school he took part in the
important excavations being conduct-
ed in the neighborhood of the ancient
Mycenae.
During the war Dr. Harland served
for two years in the navy with the
rank of ensign. Dr. Harland's train-
ing has been broadly classical, and
he has also devoted much attention to
archaeology and ancient history. He
comes to Michigan warmly recom-
mended by the Princeton authoritie.
R. 0. T. C. ENROLLMENT SHOWS
INCREASE OF 30 PER CENT
Although the enrollment in the R.
0. T. C. is not yet complete, an ad-
vance of 30 per cent is noted over last
year's enrollment at the correspond-
ing time. It is expected that enroll-
ment will continue for the next two

New Dormitory
For Grls Opened
Adelia Cheever house, 516 Madison,
the newest dormitory for University
women, was opened this semester.
This home is the culmination of years
of hospitality offered .tudents by
Judge Cheever and Mrs. Adela Cheev-
er, who had occupied the residence
since' 1879.
After the death of Judge Cheever
the property was given to Miss Pame-
la Noble, a sister of Mrs. Cheever.
Miss Noble gave the house to the
University last year to be used as a
home for girls. During the summer
it was remodeled and refurnished at-
tractively to suit the needs of its 20
occupants. The houseis run on a co-
operative plan similar to the one used
at Alumnae house.
Miss Henrietta Scranton, a Vassar
graduate, is the social director.o

LET'S GO MICHIGA
Michigan's fourth annual '
day will be celebrated at 7:
tonight in Hill auditorium,
freshmen will assemble to 1
ed on Michigancustoms.
Angus G. Goetz, '22M, pre
the Student council and for.
tain of the Varsity football
two years, will preside over
ing. George 0. Brophy, '22
tary of the Union, will ex
only freshman traditions
those Michigan traditions
followed by upperclassmen.
Prof. Wenley to Se
Prof. Robert M. Wenley
philosophy departmentawill
the faculty, and an alumni
is also on the program P
every phase of University
everythiing that Michigan
the students, the alumni, any
ulty will be explained to the
1925. Michiganv traditions
toms will be the principal
the speakers; their origin
told and reasons'for thei\o
explained.
The Varsity band and A
bert, .22E, official cheer lea
add the final touch of finess
Michigan gathering. An add
will. be a quartette compose
Mills, '23, H. C. Walser, '2
Kemp, '23M, and H. P. Wagn
Songs on Progran
Freshmen will be given
tunity to hear and sing
cherished songs. George O
director of music in A
schools, will lead the songs
The doors of the auditori
open at 7 o'clock and th
will begin promptly at 7:3
men are asked to come earl
seats on the first floor. A
classmen or others will b
in the balcony.
It Is promised that the
will last only about one
that everything will be b
snappy. Members of th
council state that this is
ly not a time for hazing a
there to enforce their ord
. LET'S GO MICHIGA

Sophs Get Most Men In Honor Circle
of Students Last Semester
Twenty students n the Engineering
college received all "A" grades last
semester, 6 Seniors, 3 Juniors, r7
Sophomores, and 4 Freshmen. This is
9 more than for the last semester of
the school year 1919-20.
The men were: C. H. Chen, '21, A.
M. Courtright, '23, Neil Crane, '23, A.
B. Curtis, '22, W. L. Fink, '21, T. R.
Halman, '21, B.' F. Hausman, '24, R.
M. Hazen, '22, J. N. Landis, '21, C. C.
McArthur, '24, E. F. Moore, '21, L.-K.
Mower, '23, W. J. Piper, '23, D. C.
Seitz, '23, A. H. Stuart, '23, T. C.
Thompson, '24, I. B. Whinery, '21, G.
W. Whitney, '23, H. L. Wilcox, '24,
and J. T. Woolfenden, '22.
There have been only a. few times
When the number, of all "A" men in
the college was as large as this.
YEARLING'S ENROLLMENT
FOR GYM CLASSES URGED

At the close of last semester anew
national fraternity was formally in-
stalled on the campus, the members
of the Alpha Beta Phi, a local frater-
nity, being initiated into the nationa
fraternity, Alpha Chi, Rho. The in-
stitution of the chapter was conduct-
ed by the national officers and repre-
sentatives from other chapters of the
fraternity. '
The Michigan chapter has been'des-
ignated as the Phi Xi and forms the
eighteenth chapter of the fraternity.
Alpha Chi Rho is now located at 1001
E. Huron street.
FIRST ALPHA NU MEETING
SCHEDULED AT 7:30 TONIGHT

weeks.
The infantry and ordinance corps.
have the lowest number of members.
These two departments are new this
year. Forty-six more men are needed
to fill the required minimum enroll-
ment for the infantry and ordinance
corps. The total enrollment for all
four departments Is 388. s
This year the regulation R. 0. T.
C. uniform will be worn during drill
and instruction periods.

FRESHMAN BIBLES
STILL AVAIL
If the first year students
campus who have not as y
ceived their copies of the "
man Bible" will kindly c
Lane hall, -they may receil
same,

"All freshmen who have not enroll-
ed for (gymnasium classes should do
so at once," said Dr. George A. May,
director of Waterman gymnasium.
He urges that both lits snd engineers
arrange, their classes as quickly as
possible.
Attention is also called to the mem-
bers of the freshman class that the
entire course of hygiene lectures
should be attended this month.
"WHISIES" HOUSED WITH
UNIVERSITY PUBLICATIONS

BURTON EMPHASIZES THE IMPORTANCE
UPPERCLASS ADVISORY WORK A T MEE'

JSTRIAL DEPRESSION RESPONSIBLE
FORTREND IN ENROLLMENT THIS YEAR

iustrial depression during the
summer is responsible for the
ected change in the trend of en-
ent," said Registrar Arthur G.
in commenting on the enroll-
situation yesterday afternoon.
nparing the present year with
ear at the same time, Registrar
states that in the College of Lit-
re, Science, and the Arts, the
er of' upperclassmen shows an
ase, the number of first-year
shows an increase, but the num-
f first-year men shows a slight

number of freshmen has fallen off,2
while the number 'entering the Medi-{
cal school is remarkably higher than
last year.
In time of prosperity, according to
Registrar Hall, there is always an in-
crease in the number of entering men
and a falling off' of upperclassmen
'who are ttracted by big money out-
side. In times of stress, just the op-
posite is the case as men contemplat-
ing entering cannot do so for finan-
cial reasons, and upperclassmen de-
tide they can put their time in to1
better advantage by- continuing inl
school. This rule does not seem to
influence the women to such a mark-

Alpha Nu, campus oratorical socie-
ty, will hold its first yearly meeting
at 7:30 o'clock tonight in their rooms
on the third. flor of University Hall.
Tha .program will be informal. The
older men will give impromptu talks:
All freshmen interested in public
debating are invited to attend.
BURTON HOLDS CONFERENCES1
WITH REGENTS' CO MITTEES
Members of the various committees
of the Board of Regents were in con-t
ference with President Marion L. Bur-
ton throughout the day Thursday in
preparation for the monthly meeting
of the board today. The meeting will.
be in the Regents' room in the Law.

"Whimsies," the latest literary ex-
pansion of the campus, is to have of-
ce space in the Publications office. It
will not be a part of the Student
Publications, will have 'no connection
with them, and will not be under the
supervision of the Board of Control.
UNION'REOPENS ALLEYS
FOLLOWING AITERATION
Bowling alleys in the basement of
the Union have been reopened after
alterations and will be ready for use
the rest of the year.' A total of
$250 has been expended in replaning

"You menare dealing with the most
precious asset which the University
has. Upon your handling of that asset
depends to no small extent, the future
college life 16f the freshmen in your
charge, and in your skill in getting
from them the best that is in them,
for their benefit of course, 'bft just as
much for the University, rests the
future of the University," said Presi-
dent Marion L. Burton when he sound-
ed the keynote of the upperclass ad-
visory work for this year at the meet-
ing at the Uniou last night.
Speaking before an overcrowded'
reading room, President Burton
brought out in. succession, the four
leading essentials of such work as
th* advisors 'will have to do. Giving'
"Over the Top" as a slogan for the
work, he showed how it must, as the
same time, be' over certain obstacles,
with certain purposes against certain

Burton emphasized the fact
value of the work of the a
the University was such th
this year is impossible, th
purpose and consistent w
to sacrifice and work is the
which can be possible this
Following President Burl
dress, W. W. Gower, '22, chi
the Upperclass Advisory c
explained! the details of the
tion, the way in which the
tion of names would be ha
how the men should go at it
their results. Each advisor
four freshmen, it was expl
after four meetings, includli
four divisions into which
men will be dibided, each m
,get into personal 'and freqi
with his charges. Booklets
in detail the work of the ad.
fmc'intr 'Anr7 h --mann

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