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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 13, 1921 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-11-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAIL Y

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tA I
w- ;:T , MANE

kv

There

is a

QUALITY ATMOSPHERE
Students like to come to us because we make suits

of true quality at moderate prices.

They appreciate

the fact that we Jo not dictate style but rather fol-
low the wishes of our patrons.

W e makte every sui
we sell
31 5Tate Sty

Tailors

Haberdashers

Hatters

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,.
r, r \
.
4
4
J
«'
.....+ "
f
l!

r \
r
rr
r netted Kittens!

With claws!

Lolling in

"There are many reasons justifying
the existence of the second eleven. It
offers players any opportunity to con-
tinue in active daily practice who for
various reasons, are not able to con-
tinue on the Varsity. The Varsity
coaches- can give intensive training to
only a limited number of men and that
group of men must be selected at an
early date in the fall campaign. With-
out the second eleven, the men not
thus retained would have to give up
footballs or play it spasmodically and
thus curtail any natural ability which
they possessed. If the originally se-
lected university group met with un-
usual accidents or the original selec-
tions failed, as they sometimes do, to
live up to erly season promises, there
would be no reserve force in active
trainingto call up for replacements.
These two factors alone give ample
reason for the existence of the second
eleven, and make it in reality an m-
tegral part of the/university team al-
though, largely for practical reasons,
it is given a separate entity and title.
"The work of the second eleven auto-
matically falls into two classes-what
the men do for themselves, and what
they do for some one else. The very
help which they give some one else,
namely the Varsity, retards their own
personal exploitation. It comes about
in this way. Each week, a part of the
work of the second team is to demon-
strate for the Varsity the play of the
Varsity's opponents for that week. If
only 20 plays are used from each team
on the schedule, this means some 190
plays per-season for the second team
to learn and execute as well as pos-
sible. As 40 plays are enough for any
team, it follows that the second team
men can concentrate to only one fourth
the extent which they should to per-
feet their own attack. With the ab-
sence of that high state df perfection,
it is by no means surprising that the
team attack is not 1000 per cent perfect
and the individual is not able to show
his true worth.
"The work of the second eleven un-
fortunately must be done with little
chance for public recognition. Most
of the work is done behind the closed
gates of the Varsity field with no blast
of trumpets or applause. It is a de-
serving bunch of men who toil day
after day on the Reserves. As such
they ask no favors from any one, but
if a victory goes on the records when
you most desire it don't forget that
the men behind the guns have done
their share in silence."
Coach Knox, Harvard.

pleasure and purring thru an
idle life.
A story of those who would
rather be "ladies" than wo-

L

STARTING TODA Y

tL

Is

men.

The life-they
things they do.
they pay.

lead.
The

The
price

SThe Story of the

p I --- - = -- .

I

"Lilies"

of Society

.. ,;

ALL THE Sides of mod-
ern woman's life! Her
glory, hers foibles, her
ways witl the world and
men! In a gorgeous, in-
timate picture of things
not everybody knows.

s

r6

GEORG LOAN
PRODUCTION

d1/
-I

wLQ:&3IfY Co NiPSOt4

BG COMEDY ATTRACTION

I''

A picture that only George Loane Tucker could
make. Brilliant, beautiful, real. The last in his
life and his only one since "The Miracle Man."

T OR C HY 'S
PROMOTI ON"

With

SCHOOL
OF DANCING
All the latest steps in mod-
ern ballroom dancing taught
in private lessons.
Private and class lessons in
ballet, national, interpreta-
tive, aesthetic and toe dapc-
ing (Ruissjan and Italian
method.)
JEANETTE KRUSZKA
jOmNSO
Studio: 721 N. University Ave.
(Above Lyndon'Kodak Shop)
PHONE 788-J

:;,,
:

A -

TOPICS

JOHNNY HINES
From the famous Sewell Ford Stories

i

ORCHESTRA

COMING

__

I... 'k,
\:, -L. - i

iiS

j7L

"The Child
Thou
Gavest Me"

SOON

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z e,' w . -5

i

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