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November 09, 1921 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-11-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

_ _R . 10__ _THE MICHIGAN DAILY

. v

The Christmas Cards-

o.
r
_ q t
Vote

and Stationery
are Roady!!
Orders for engraved cards are
being received daily. Engrav-
ing and Embossing orders left
with us are executed by the best
engravers in the country.

)

0. D. MORRILL
17 NICKELS ARCADE
OPEN EVENINGS

Technic Makes
Bob To Campus
In Novel Form
(By W. B. Butler)
The best Journal of any technical
school in the country," is the general
concensus of opinion on the Michigan
Technic which makes its debut to the
campus at large in new size and quali-
ty today. The distinctive cover is
something unique in technical publi-
cations, in attrative appearance por-
traying the familiar diagonal walk!
thru the Engineering arch. The new
size permits a better class of adver-
tising than many college magazines
carry, for among the advertisers are
to be found the Otis Elevator Co.,
Westinghouse Koehering Co, Western
Electric Co., and others of national
prominence.
Matter of Popular Interets
The magazine should be widely read
by the campus in general because its
slogan "A Journal of a Technical Col-
lege" is well carried out in its series
of articles of popular interest. J. T.
N. Hoyt, chief structural engineer for
Albert Kahn, has written an article
called "The Nescience of Engineering"
in which he points out in an inter-
esting manner that engineering is an
art, not a science. "Lake Superior as
a Mill Pod," written by L. C. Sabin,
'90E, presents in non-technical ver-
nacular the story of how Lake Su-
peritr water has been harnessed in
the St. Mary's River. Mr. Sabin is
recognized as one of the foremost en-
gineers in America. Prof. Walter E.
Lay, of the mechanical engineering
department, tells of the new automo-
tive laboratory.
Articles by Undergraduates
"The Engineering Society" is the
title of an article written by G. E.
Gregory, president of that organiza-
tion. Other innovations are the ar-
ticles written by engineering under-
graduates, "The Detroit-Windsor Sus-
pension Bridge" by William A. Cot-
ton, Jr., '23E, and "Engineering Op-
portunities in South America" by
Bernard L. Beckwith, '21E. An ar-J
ticle entitled "The Immediate Needs
of Chemistry in America" by William
J. Hale of the Dow Chemical Co., Mid-
land, takes up the important factors!
for progress in chemistry and the re-
lation of the college man to the chemi-
cal industry. "College Notes" tell of
the activities of the engineering col-
lege in general, while "Alumni Notes"
should attract graduates.
SUNDWVAL WANTS EVERY-
STUDENT IN ATHLETICS
FAVORS MORE GYMNASIUM SPACE
AND A GLASS COVERED
OUTDOOR POOL

departments more eMclent. It hopes
to bring up the standard of physique
among the students and to turn out
more and better athletes.
When questioned regarding plans for
the immediate future, Dr. Sundwall
mentioned that he has been here le ss
than:three months, and could not an-
nounce a definite program as yet. lHe
expressed extensive plans for the
future, however. Among other things,
he believes that the University needs
more gymnasium space, and an out-
door swimming pool enclosed in glass.
He favored the acquisition of a gym-
nasium with a natural ground floor,
similar to the one at Illinois, where
baseball and football can be played .l
the year.
In 1897 money raised by sub scrip-
Lion to buy uniforms for the band had
to be used to pay expenses; hence no
uniforms.

Ann Arbor Water

I'

A1 cake of our

HARD, WATER SOAP

Is the Best argument

EBERBA CH & SON CO.
200-204 East Liberty Street

A

I

Ar

The state legislature in 1897 ap- Amovement to organize a studen
propriated $20,000 to provide an eiec- golf club and lay out links along th
tric lighting plant for the University. Huron River was started in 1897.

I

11

~-z-.
rr

NEW NECKTIE
often redeems an old suit.
Cheney Cravats offer col-
ourful novelties, conser-
vative patterns for formal
wear, and harmonious
effects that express one's
personality or mood. See
them today at the dealers
listed below.
CRAVAT -

And Still Becomingne svis
Allinery 's- Leading Charm
The lines of beauty were never more alluring--whether the shape
be large or small.
Fur, metallic gold and silver cloths and duvetyn bestow the rich
background, and beads, embroidery, ribbons or plumes furnish
the adornment.

d

Variety today is plentiful; but it must grow less now, day by
The time of gratifying selection cannot be longer postponed.
our superb collection of most recent dress hats.

day.
See

Mack & Co., Main St.
F. W. Gross, Main St.
N. F. Allen, 211 S. Main St.
Wadhams & Co., 201 S. Main $t.
S. 0i. Davis, Toggery Shop, 1195. Main St.
Liiidenschmitt, Apiel Co., 209 MaIn St.
Reule, Conlin, Fiegel Co., 200-2 S. Main St.
Wadlhams & Co., Nickels Arcade
J. F. Wuertih Co., 222-224 S. Main St.

______ _______________t

"We expect eventually to have every
student in the University engaged in
some form of physical exercise, games,
or sport," was the expression of Dr.
John Sundwall, newly appointed dir-
ector of the department of hygiene
and public health, when questioned as
to the plans of the new department.
"A student tends to becomes neglect-
ful of exercise as the years at college
pass," the doctor explained, and point-
ed out that it was with this problem-
they wire contending.
Dr. Sundwall explained that the
work of the new department was that
of co-operation, to make the work of
the Health service, and the athletic

Fashion decrees that the small off the face is the leading model to be worn
for dress occasions this season and with the coming of the colder weather
fur will will be the most popular fabric, Hudson Seal, Caracul; Krimer.
Squirrel: Nutria and Scotch Mole are to be found among our best models.
The exceptional beauty 'and style of our Dress Hats
warrants your' inspection.

1

c t+
_aThe,"Macne"
-A Fyfe Shoe at
$10
SPLENDID example of the new broad toe
A last; well constructed of domestic grain calf-
skin with heavy weight single sole, soft tip, and dis-
tinctive punch woix.. Medium shade tan or black.
A Complete Display Over
Calkii :s' Drug Store
Tom Lally, Representative

lb
_;:,
- N.
.. - ri--= __
/ 4~// //

THE TURKISH CIGARETTE

AAE.ACEPĀ£ M ~ lN
{1SgO NfH$ RD.

{ rst I I i 'll

E VERY day MURADS
are held higher in the
estimation of the men
who smoke them.
They are the standard of
Taste.
They are 100% pure Turk-
ish tobacco -of the finest
varieties grown.
They never disappoint -

never fail-never change-w
You are proud to smoke
them in any company-on
any occasion.
They are the largest sell-
ing high-grade cigarette in
the world.
The cigarette smokers of
America DO prefer Quality
to Quantity.

On Grand Circus Park
DETROIT

2 0AdkE

Makers o tho i&9hest rt, 'Turkish
and E yption Ciyarlles in the World

'Judge for Yourself-'-!"

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