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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 09, 1921 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-11-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

. ...

OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER JF TE UNIVERSITY
OPPIIAL OF MIC1-IIGAN
Puhlished cve ry mor .1 exc Monday during the Univer-
sity year by thr to,.rd ai n ntrol If Student Publications.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associatmd Press is exclusively entitled to the use for
republication of all news dspatches credited to it or not otherwise
credited in this jpaper and thi, loyal news published therein.
&ntered at the poswice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
class matter.
Suoscription. by carrier or mail, $3.50.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press building, Maynard Street,
Phones: Business, 960; Editorial, 2414.
Cominiunications not to exceed 3oo words, if signed, the sig-
nature not necessarily to appear it print, but as an evidence of
faith, and notices of events will be published in The Daily at the
discretion of the Lditor, if left at or mailed to The Daily office.
Unsigned commnufications will receive no consideration. N~o man-
uscript will be retarned unless the writer incloses postage.
The Daily does not necessarily endorse the sentiments ex-
pressed in the communications.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
MANAGING EDITOR .......... BREWSTER P. CAMPBELL
Assistant Managing Editor...................Hugh W. Hitchcock
City Editor .................... . ..........E. P. Lovejoy, Jr.
Night Editors-
R .FAdams G. P. Overton
Edward Lambhrecbt M. B. Stahl
Hugnston McIam Paul Watzel
Iditorial Board Chairman........................T. J. Whinery
Assistants-
S.T. Beach E. R. Meiss
L. A. Kern Leo Hershdorfer
Sunday Magazine Editor................Thornton W. Sargent, Jr.
Qxchange Editor............................George E. Sloan
Music Editor......... . .....................Sidney B. Coates
Sporting Editor ................................ George Reindel
Women's Editor.............................Elizabeth Vickery
Humor Editor ....................................E R. Meiss
Assistants
R. N. Byers L. L. Fenwick B. H. Lee
W. °B. Butler H. B. Grundy E. . Mack
A. D. Clark Agncs I lolmuist athrine Montgomery
Harry C. Clark H. E. Howlett R. C. Moriarity
SP. Comstock Marion Kerr R. B. Tarr
hn PDason . S. Kerr Virginia Ton
i.A. Donahue M. A. Klaver Dorothy Whipple
W.F. Eliott Marion Koch L. L. Yost

- .-

When the freshman subscribes for a campus maga-
zine, or contributes to some sort of fund or other,
he is not commended by the upperclassmen in his
house. On the contrary his elders look at him de-
risively and ask he has bought his campus ticket
so +far. When the team loses a game the cry is im-
mediately poor coaching, or favoritism, and "I told
you so."
The need today is for a healthier interest and a
less superficial analysis of causes, and the one
should lead to the other, The great evil is, after
all, our disinclination to think, and our tendency to
jump at a solution which may be totally wrong, but
which will give us credit for actual knowledge
through our seeming sophistication. Once we are
interested in something outside ourselves we are
likely to be willing to analyze it carefully enough
so as to reach something somewhere near the real
solution. Let's discard this fruitless pose - let's
become interested !
MURDERING THE KING'S ENGLISH
Last week a foreigner prominent in diplomatic
affairs, had occasion to remark that even those
Americans who profess the most intelligence fail to
speak the English language with any marked degree
of correctness. One's first thought is to pass by the
remark as being hypercritical. But on reflection
and consideration of the statement in view of con-
ditions at the University, it can be seen that there
is much truth in what he said.
It is beyond the scope of this article to discuss the
prevalence of slang on the campus. Instead of de-
serving the severe "panning" that some of our eld-
ers think, this can be upheld because it lends a-
*touch of local color to the collegian's vocabulary.
But anyone who frequents a few of the favorite
student haunts is -a witness to a murder of the Eng-
lish language. Grammatical errors are made in
abundance by people who profess to be educated
and who are attempting seriously to convey impres-
sions. Scarcely less offensive and much in evidence
is the use or over-use of expressions such as "aw-
fully nice", "have got", and similar phrases many
of which are no longer actually considered poor
grammar, butall of which are either trite, meaning-
less, or bad form. The offense in both instances
is probably due to habit rather than a lack of knowl-
edge as to what is correct and what is not.
This is not intended to be a homily on grammar.
But, in the language of the bible, what profit it a
man if upon leaving the University he takes with
him a complete knowledge of foreign languages,
anatomy, poker, football, and fussing, if he cannot
speak the English language correctly?
Michigan is proud of the number of her sons
that fought in the World war. Every one of them
who is here now should see that he performs his
duty to the men who didn't come back - by pay-
ing a living tribute in the Armistice day parade.
Only two days left to get that uniform ready !
When the committee-man solicits you for the life
membership drive, don't hesitate but sign up. Make
every man a member. -

Log Log Slide Rules

i

AT

Both ends of uhe diagonal ivalk

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-''I

DETROIT UNITED LINES
Ann Arbor and Jackson
TIME TABLE
(Eastern Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars-6.os a.
r, 7:05 a. m., 8:io a. m. and hourly to 9:10
P. M.
Jackson Express Cars (local stops of Ann
\rbor), 9:48 a. mn. and every two hours to
g:48 p. in.
Local Cars East Bound-5:55 a.m., 7:00 a.
,n, and every two hours to 9:oo p. in. i :0o
". . To Ypsilanti only-it:40 p.i., 12.25
a. in., 1:15 a. m.
To Saline, change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars West Bound-7:so a. m., 2:40 p.
To Jackson and Kalamazoo-Limited cars:
x:8, roxn8~ a. 111.. 12:48. 2:48. 4:48.
To Jackson and Lansing-Limited:8:48
P. mn.
1921 NOVEMBER 1921
1 2 3 4 5
6 7 8 9 10 11 12
13 14 15 16 17 18 19
20 21 22 23 24 25 26
27 28 29 80
NOTICE TO MEN
We do all kinds of ligh-class Hat
work at pre-war prices. Hats turned
'nslde out, with all new trimmings.
are as good as new.
FACTORY HAT STORE
617 PA CKA RD STREET
Telephone 1792
TYPWRS E

rwni i uAn . nee

.

TAXI

PHONE

DODGE CABS

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.,_. ..._......_A,.

....

.

IF THE FOLKS FROM HOME
Were all here to see you, and you wanted to celebrate,
you. couldn't do better than to take them to the
CHAMBER OF COMMERCE INN
BECAUSE THEY SERVE GOOD THINGS TO EAT THERE

1I 1 f 1yi L34r14 rru +v++ + +

J. B. Young

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
BUSINESS MANAGER..............VERNON F. HILLERY
Advertising......................'F. M. Heath, A. J. Parker
Publication ..............................Nathan W. Robertson
Accunts...............................John J. Hamels, Jr.
Circulation....................-.........Herold C. Hunt
Assistants
Burr L. Robbin Richard Cutting H. Willis Heidbreder
W. Cooley James Prentiss W. Kenneth Galbraith
LI BeaumontParks Maurice Moule J. A. Dryer
Walter Scheer k i i i Godring Richard Heidemana
Edw. MuranDe Tyler Stevens PTaulH Wolfe
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 1921
Night Editor-R. E. ADAMS, JR.
Assistant-Harold - Howlett. - Proof-
readers-Robert Tarr, Leland Yost,
THE SPICE OF VARIETY
It is with a heave of relief that many of us greet
the announcement of a Band Bounce to relieve for
one night the monotony of a continuous round of
equally good movies which make up the seven to
eight-thirty's of our college education. It means
that there will be a different type.of entertainment
in store, a unique collection of carefully prepared
musical acts to be presented by members of the
student body.
The primary reason for the giving of a Band
Bounce, however, is not to compete with the screen
emporiums or boulevard strolls of the campus at
large, but to raise funds to send the University
band in support of Michigan's team o a foreign
field. The inspiring tones of the "Victors" resound-
ing in the ears of our players instils an invincible
spirit of "conquer" which months of physical train-
ing cannot hope to accomplish.
Tonight a Band Bounce is being staged at Hill
auditorium to send our music makers to Madison,
where the Michigan eleven meets the powerful
squad of Wisconsin. The Band Bounce combines a
loyal duty with an enjoyable entertainment. For this
reason it should not fail in its purpose. Be there!
THE POSE OF SOPHISTICATION
The revolt of present day youth against estab-
lished conventions has provided themes for a num-
ber of novels, some poetry, and a great deal of dis-
cussion. Originally described as merely disrespect-
ful and unthinking, the rising generation is now
credited with the distinction of being in rebellion-a
rebellion partially spontaneous, partially deliberate.
It is certainly a fact that we, the youth of the
present, have achieved a freedom far greater than
the liberty gained by many a previous generation -
whether by our own efforts or not does not mat-
ter. It is enough that we have a wider latitude for
our actions.
But with this disrespect for hoary conventions
and established traditions has come an accompany-
ing cynical regard for even the highest ideals and
principles the race has formerly held dear. The
ideal'of fair play has been replaced in many cases
by the practical theory of gaining success at any
cost. We seem to be thinking more and more in
terms of self and less and less in terms of others.
And with it all we are not merely unashamed - we
sneer at such noble ideals without a blush. We
laugh at honor, and service, and self-sacrifice, and
we do it unpleasantly.
The worst of it is that this cynical, unbelieving
view, once merely a pose, has become a habit with
us. Very rarely, these days, do we enter into any
proposition whole-heartedly and without fear of re-
sults. Honest conviction is unusual, and support of
a worthy cause to one's own inconvenience or hard-
ship is just as uncommon.
Even in campus affairs we feel this new attitude.
The freshman, coming up from his preparatory
school with a realization of the privilege he is to en-
F joy and a determination to make tjie most out of
college life, feels it instantly. In the rooming house
or the fraternity house the atmosphere is the same.

'

$5 0buys a brand
new Corona
portable type-
writer. Other makes
at attractive prices.
See us before you buy.:
0. D. MORRILL
Ann Arbor. Mich.

MOVED TO OUR NEW LOCATION
320 East Liberty Street
F LANDER
LOWER

17 Nickels Arcade

I I

t

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The Telescope

Some More Snow
Snow, snow, beautiful snow,
Do be more careful where you go,
You float down pure, white and unstained
And hit our pavements so well drained.
Then my aesthetic hopes you crush
By turning into melting mush.
It's not your own demise I fret,
But more the sopping feet I get;
Life would be dry, but simply grand,
If on the walks you'd cease to land.
Speaking of snow, it is an element which used to
be romantically attractive until the time came when
its advent signaled the appearance of a hundred fe-
male galoshes on the campus.
Quoth Eppie Taff
They're praying now
For Buddy Frosh,
He kept on his toque
When he saw Marshal Foch.
- Helen General.

"They
Strong."

Our Latest Song Entitled:
Cave the Baby Onions to Make Him
-- Cora Nett.

Ann Arbor Daze:
The hopeless swain finds out that the poor cheese
who monopolizes Gwendolyn's time is really a rare
biJL

t.

Modern Efficiency
Of all the foolish things to do
This one sure takes the berry,
They had the depot roof removed
To make the stationery.

''When You Buy, Buy Quality "

Stolen Thunder
The young man walked down the street with one
shoe off and his coat turned inside out. A police-
man stopped him.
"What's the idea?" he demanded.
"Well, you see, it's this way," replied the young
fellow, "I'm taking a course at a correspondence
school, and yesterday those darned sophomores
wrote me and told me to haze myself.
--Owl.
Famous Closing Lines
"You're docked," said the boss as he shoved his
ferry boat up on the shore. ERM.

z
_
A 6. T4h:H isMw

W AGNER & COMPANY
For Men Since 1848
STATE STREET A T LIBERTY

I

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