100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 08, 1921 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-11-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHICAN DAILY

_ . _____

OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY
OF.MICHIGAN
Pulished every morning except Monday during the Univer-
sity year by the Board in Control of Student Publications.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated'Piress is exclusively entitled :to the-use -for
republication of all news dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
credited in this paper and the local news published therein.
Entered at the postollice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
class matter.
_ Suuscription by carrier or mail, $3.50.
Oflics: Ann Arbor Press building, Maynard Street,
Phones: Business, 960; Editorial, 2414.
Communications not to exceed Soo words, if signed, the sig-
nature not necessarily to appear in print, bht as an evidence. of
faith, and notices of events will be published in The Daily at the
discretion of the Editor, if left at or mailed to The Daily office.
Unsigned communications will receive no consideration. No man*
uscript will be returned unless the writer incloses postage.
The Daily does not necessarily endorse the sentiments ex-
pressed in the communications.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
MANAGING EDITOR........... BREWSTER P. CAMPBELL
Assistant Managing Editor..................Hugh W. Hitchcock
City Editor................................. E. P. Lovejoy, Jr.
Night Editors-
R. E. Adams G. P. Overton
Edward Lambrecht M. B. Stahl
Hugnston McBain Paul Watzel
Editorial Board Chairman.......................T. J. Whinery
Assistants-
5. T. Beach E. R. Meiss
L. A. Kern Leo Hershdorfer
Sunday Magazine Editor................Thornton W. Sargent, Jr.
Exchange Editor..............................George L. Sloan
Music Editor.................................Sidney B. Coates
Sporting Editor................................ George Reindel
Women's Editor ............................Elizabeth Vickery
Humor Editor ....................................E R. Meiss
Assistants
R. N. Byers L. L. Fenwick B. H. Lee
W. B. Butler H. B. Grundy . E. Mack
A. D. Clark Agnes Homquist Kathrine Montgomery
Harry C. Clark H. E;. Howlett R. C. Moriarity
t.hP. C omstock Marion Kerr R. B. Tarr
n P. Dawson L. S. Kerr Virginia Tryon
. A. Donahue M. A. Klaver Doroth yWhipple
W. F. Elliott Marion Koch L. L. Yost

.J. B. Young

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
BUSINESS MANAGER..............VERNON F. HILLERY
Advertising........................F. M. Heath, A. J. Parker
Publication .............................. Nathan W. Robertson
Accounts ..................................John J. Hamels, Jr.
Circulation...................................Herold C. Hunt
Assistants
Burr L. Robbins Richard Cutting H. Willis Heidbreder
W. Cooley James Prentiss W. Kenneth Galbraith
L. Beaumont Parks Maurice Moule JA. Dryer
Walter Scherer ~iii tin Goldring ichard Heideman
Fdw. Murane Tyler Stevens T. H. Wolfe
DavidParkPaul Blun
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 1921
Night Editor-. P. DAWSON, JR.
Assistant-Ben H. Lee; Prootreades-
R. M. Loeb, F. N. Brown.
There will be a meeting of the entire Daily edi-
torialstaff and tryouts at 5 o'clock this afternoon.
AN ATTRACTIVE INVESTMENT
Today, or within the next two days, every Uni-
versity man not now a life-member of the Michigan
Union will be given an opportunity to become one.
The Union does not have to beg for aid, for it
offers advantages and opportunities in return worth
far in excess of what the life-member pays. With
its wonderful building, its fine appointments, its
various entertainments, and its hotel accommoda-
tions it represents an investment of some million
and a quarter dollars. It provides a suitable place
for the entertainment of guests. It is the nerve
center of all student activities. It is a permanent
home, to which a life-member is welcome at any
time in the years to come.
All this the life-member secures for the sum of
fifty dollars, and is given four years in which to
pay it.
Any man who fails to take advantage of this op-
portunity to become a life member in the finest col-
lege club in the United States is not only showing
a deplorable lack of true Michigan spirit, but is
also missing a very good investment which will
bring greater and greater returns as the years
pass by.
GUILDS OF STUDENTS
Just as the first university of which we have any
record - the University of Bologna - was a guild
of students who managed their own affairs so our
modern universities are in the main guilds of stu-
dents adequately organized for campus and social
functions. This is the central idea expressed by
Wilbur Abbot of the history department of Dart-
mouth university and formerly an instructor at
Michigan, in an article in the November issue of the
"Atlantic Monthly". Throughout the article Pro-
fessor Abbot lauds vigorously college activities, so-
cieties, and everything which tends to make the
modern university a guild of students instead of a
collection of individuals. But in his opinion there
are two things needed for the betterment of the or-
ganization.
I. To connect this vigorous, undisciplined,
loosely organized development with the saner
standards and the worthier ends of mature minds on
the principle of old men for counsel and young men
for war.
2. Recognition by the students themselves of the
duties and the responsibilities their system has
brought with it. The idea of doing something for
the university rather than for oneself.
It is hard to agree with the professor's first prop-
osition. Though the ardor and foolhardiness of
youth may be in evidence in everything that is done
by undergraduates on the college campus, strange
as it may seem, the various enterprises are as a rule
unusually successful. This success might be height-
ened by the wisdom of older heads, -but it is likely
that instead of proving a steadying influence such
advice would serve only to check the youthful en-

thusiasm of students. At least it would be a damper
on the development of initiative. It is better for
campus workers to find out for themselves where
.the rocks are than to have each pebble pointed out
to them by members of the faculty.
.In his second point, Professor Abbot has unde-
niably touched on the chief source of danger to
- student- activities. In them the aim of the individ-
ual must at all times be toward doing something
constructive for the university rather than toward
self-aggrandizement. Professor Abbot's suggestion,
if fully carried out, would not hinder efficiency but
could only heighten the spirit which at present per-
meates our activities and makes for greater insti-
tutions.
It is right that our undergraduate life should be
organized to such an extent that our universities re-
semble the ancient guilds. But if back of it
should prevail the strictly selfish motives which
were to often found in these medieval corporations,
instead of the one big idea of organizing primarily
for the promotion of our institutions, it is doubtful
if the resemblance is worth accentuating.
GOOD SPORTSMANSHIP
In the "Sport Snaps" column of the Ohio State
Lantern for Nov. I appears the following: "Rich-
ards, of Wisconsin will be there to get a line on the
Maroons, while Yost of Michigan will in all prob-
ability be there to see how good football should be
played."
Leaving out of consideration the effect such an
uncalled-for statement might have upon the student
body of a sister University, we only wish to re-
mind Ohio that the difference between being a good
loser and a poor winner is good sportsmanship.
Athletic relations between Ohio State and Michi-
gan have in the past been friendly and satisfac-
ory. We hope they continue so.
THE IMITATOR
It seems inevitable that a certain percentage of
mortals should be imitators, just as statistics show
a certain percentage of the population has blue eyes
or live in cities.
The imitators part their hair in the middle-be-
cause Doug Fairbanks does, wear English clothes
with baggy pants of the 1890 vintage, imitate South-
erners by saying, "we all", and rush certain co-eds
because others do.
In short the imitator lacks individuality.
He is like a sheep, never leading, content to al-
ways follow, content to remain a second-rater.
And so he continues to be one of the innumerable
multitude who never rises above mediocrity. He
becomes a rubber stamp.
Don't be an imitator - or a ruber stamp.
Guess Marshal Foch ought to know what a real,
peppy Michigan mass meeting looks like, sounds
like, and feels like.
T he Telescope
It Should Not Apply
The other day
We saw an expression of opinion
In a metropolitan newspaper
Which seems appropriate at this time
When we are wondering
Whether classes will be called off
On Armistice day.
The clipping said
That it's a poor war
Which doesn't give us a few
National holidays.
Isn't it the truth?
There Must Be Some Reason for This
Editor of the Telescope -
Dear Sir: Why call them "Freshmen" when any
girl knows that they are not half so fresh as the
Sophomores? Geraldine.
Esteemed Lady: Not being a girl ourself, we hes-
itate to answer this weighty question. Perhaps one
of your own fair sex will take it upon herself to

send us a short but satisfactory response.
Yours for individual ideas and a show of some in-
tellect. Erm.
Quoth EPpie Taff:
Here lies our friend
Poor Frelerick Roth,
He found some chicken
In his broth.

P---___________________________________)

DETROIT UNITED LINES
Ann Arbor and Jackson
TIME TABLE
(Eastern Standard Time)
Detroit. Limited and Express Cars-6.o5 a.
M., 7:05 a. m., 8:io a. m. and hourly to 9:20
P. Mn.
Jackson Express Cars (local stops of Ann
Arbor), 9:48 a. in. and every two hours to
9:48 p. in.
Local Cars East Bound-5:55 a.m., 7:oo a.
Im and every two hours to 9 :oo p. m., ii :oo
p. i. To Ypsilanti only-ii:4o p. m., 22.25
a. in., : 15 a. mn.
o Saline, change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars West Bound-7 :5o a. in., 2:40 p.
m.
To Jackson and Kalamazoo-Limited cars:
8 :48, o0A& a. mn., 12 :48, 2:48, 4:48.
To Jackson and Lansing-Limited: 8:48
p. M.

i
t

they please
they soothe
they delight
they make content
they gratify
because they are
In-com-para-bly fine!
~ -4
8lended in the Good Old En&qsh

1921

6
13
20
27

7
14
21
28

NOVEMBER
1 2 3
8 ~9 10
15 16 17
22 23 24
29 80

4
11
1s
25

1921
5
12
19
26

/or J

NOTICE TO ME
We do all kinds of high-class Hat
work at pre-war prices. Hats turned
anside out, with ial new trimmings,
are as good as new.
FACTORY HAT STORE
617 PACKARD STREET
Telephone 1792

Wa

Log Log Slide Rules
PAT
GRAHAM Ii
B/oth ends of the diagonal Ivalk

'i1

-.I%-

From our olvn lexicon of
familiar terms and phrases
~f
The Michigan Cafeteria--Ann
Arbor's newest, largest
Syn. Purity, Service, Variety,
Low Prices, Convenience
On Fast Liberty betiveen
laynard and State Streets

TEl
1
4

DO SUITS
TAILORED TO YOUR INDIVIDUAL

"Where
"Search

The Rock of Ages
do bugs go in the winter time ?"
me." -Nemo.

MEASUREMENTS BY
KAHN OF INDIANAPOLIS
$68 to $95
-OR-
Ready-to-Wear
$45 to $70

Our Latest Song Entitled:
"If the Bell Wouldn't Work, Would the Key-
ring?"
Stolen Thunder
(Touching)
At first she touches up her hair
To see if it's in place,
And then with manner debonair,
She touches up her face,
A touch of curls behind her ear,
A touch of cuffs and collars,
And then she's off to Daddy dear
To touch him for ten dollars.
-Punch Bowl.
Famous Closing Lines
"De-pressed spirits," muttered the hobo as he
saw the wine run from the grape press.
ERM.

Tinker &Company
SO. STATE ST. AT WILLIAM ST.
DRESS SUITS FOR RENTAL

_ _ _ __ _ _ __ _ _ -

;

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan