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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 08, 1921 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-11-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE WEATHER
N0W xAYA VQLDRE
TODAY

fiRtr t IWAPV*Wrn

Dfl4t

PRAS
DALY A"D NIGHT
s~a ICE

VOL. XXXIL No. $8. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 191 PRICIVE C

UNION LIFE 1DRIE
FOR 160MEN
SET FOR. TODAY1
COMMITTEES .ALLOWED THREE
DAYS FOR FILLINGE
QUOTA
200 PICKED SOLICITORS '
TO SEE NON-MEMBERS
Silver Loving Cup Offered Salesman
Most Successful in Securing
Aplications
More than 200 picked salesmen, who
will open a campaign this morning to
increase the Union's life membership
role by 1600 new names, met last
night in the assembly hall of the
Union for final instructions. The men
were addressed by Emerson Swart,
'22E, president of the Union, who em-
phasized the importance of the cam-
paign to the forward progress of the
Union. Maynard A. Newton, '22, gen-
eral chairman of the committee for the
drive, explained the system which
will be used in approaching pros-
pective members.
Listed by Districts
Lists of non-members who will be
solicited, which will be used by the
drive workers, are made out accord-
ing to geographically divided dis-
tricts. By concentrating on his dis-
trict alone, which will be confined to
a small area, the solicitor will be able
to attain acertain degree of efilcienc,
with the least possible expenditure of
time and effort.
According, to committee members,
failure to convince the non-member
upon first meeting him will not be ac-
cepted as defeat. In former campaigns
it has been noted that failure to ob-
tain the student's signature on the
first visit, or being met with positive
refusal, was in almost every case due
to the fact that either the solicitor
unintentionally mis-stated a point in
his argument or failed to make him-
self clear to his' listener. When a
second interview is considered neces-
sary, the "flying squadron," a team
composed of the best available solic-
itors on the campus, will be called into
service.
Large Proportion Freshmen
The goal for this year's drive has
been set at 1,600, over 1,400 of whom
are freshmen. The report of the pro-
gress of each team in the race to com-
plete this quota will be submitted at
the Union desk not later than 10
o'clock on each night. According to
the chairman, competition on the com-
mittee will be even keener than last
year, for it has been decided to offer
a silver loving cup to the committee-
man who turns in the largest number
of new applicatiods for membership.
Also the team which -has the highest
standing in the final returns will be
properly recognizede The campaign
will continue three days and will close
with the final reports at 10 o'clock
Thursday ni ht.
Life me ership in the Union, ac-
cording to the, committee chairman,
constitutes.the permanent possession
by the member of all privileges which
he enjoyed while a student, in addition
to any further advantages which may
be added later. The fee is $50, of
which the first annual $10 payment
must be made before or during the
last year of residence at the Univer-
city or in the year succeeding gradu-
ation. If the first payment is made

before Dec. 1 of the last year credit
will be given for the yearly Union fee
paid to the University. Students not
in their last year of residence may
begin payments on a life membership,
but no credit will be given for the
annual fee except that paid in their
last year in the University.
For former students and alumni
wishing to take out life membership
during the year succeeding their grad-
uation the fee is $50 payable in one
bulk sum.

THURSDAY LAST.
DAY TO SECURE
WISCONSIN SEATS
Tickets for the Wisconsin game at
Madison Saturday will be sold at the
athletic office -until Thursday, after
which time there will be no place in
this city where they can be secured.
At theiresent time the 1,000 tick-
ets, which were received here the lat
ter part of last week and placed on
sale Saturday, are being disposed of
fast, and there is every indication that
the entire lot will be sold. Those that
are not disposed of in this city be-
fore Thursday night will be sent back
to Madison and will be placed on sale
there.
Attention is also called to the fact
that Thursday is the last day when
orders for student tickets for the Min-
nesota game will be received and fil-
ed according to the class preference
rule.
CONCERT DATE SET
Nov. 29 Named as Day for Annual Fall
Show of Varsity Musical
Clubs
POSTER ON EXHIBITION
AT GRAHAM'S THIS WEE
Announcement of the sixty-third an-
nual fall concert of the Varsity Glee
and Mandolin club, to be held Nov. 29
at Hill auditorium, was made last
night at the meeting of the committee
heads of the club.
The program for the concert, al-
though not yet fully arranged, will in
clude feature and novelty numbers as
well as strictly musical numbers.
These, according to Gordon F. God-
ley, '22E, manager of the club, will
put spice into the concert without de-
tracting from the musical numbers,
which will remain as the main attrac-
tion. The recently formed banjo sex-
tette from the Mandolin club will
probably make its appearance. Com-
plete announcement of the program
will be made within a short time.
The poster of Clayton B. Seager's,
'23, who is the winner of the poster
contest, will be put in the window of
Graham's book store this morning.
The poster design will remain there
for the next few days, prior to its be-
ing mailed to the engraver.
Freshmen Asked to See Advisers
Freshmen whose advisers have not
seen them or who have changed their
addresses since registration are asked
to see a member of the upperclass
advisers' cotmittee at the office on
the third floor of the Union between
2 and 4 o'clock Wednesday afternoon.
Technic Appears Today
In new size and with a distinctive
cover the Michigan Technic will ap-
pear on the campus today. The new
size permits a better class of adver-
tising than many college magazines
carry.
Lecture Course Ticket Sale Off
On account of the cancellation of
the Spargo lecture the campus sale of
tickets to the Oratorical association
lecture course has been postponed
from today to next Tuesday, Novem-
ber 15.

Plan New Informal Band
All men who are interested in the
formation of an informal band are re-
quested to meet in the auditorium of
Newberry hall at 7 o'clock Tuesday
evening, Nov. 8.
In 1892, Michigan won the first con-
test of- the Western Intercollegiate
Athletic association from Wsiconsin,
by a score of 10 to 6.

MARSHAL FOCH, COMMANDER-IN- A "CHIEF
OF ALLIED ARMIES, SENDS MESSAGl
TO MICHIGAN FACULTY AND STUDENi
FAMOUS LEADER OF VICTORIOUS FORCES IN WORLD WAR GIVE
SPECIAL GREETING ON WAY THROUGH ANN ARBOR
AS GUEST OF AMERICAN LEGION
DECLARES THOROUGH EDUCATION AND HIGH
-MORALITY ARE NECESSARY TO GREAT NATIO
Welcomed by Governor Groesbeck at Camp Custer Memorial Ceremoni4
Marks of Long Study and Labor Belied by Energy and
Dissatisfaction with Inactivity
(Editor's Note - The following article, released at the request of
writer, is the first personal interview granted by Marshal Foch on
American tour.)
(William H. Riley, Jr.)
Marshal Foch, who passed through Ann Arbor yester'day in his tour
the United States as the special guest of the American Legion, sent the
lowing message to the members of the UniversIty:
"In passing by the great University of Michigan, which unhappily I
not able to visit, I desire to send my greetings to its faculty and stud
body.
"I am a great believer in education - in a thorough one - and I
proud of the fact that I have never ceased to be a student.
"During my journey I have been much impressed at finding that. y
people believe not only in high intellectual standards but also in equ
high moral standards, for out of a long life I am convinced that both
these qualities are equally essential to the making of a great nation."
Legion Gives Out News
This message is especially significant because it is the first time tha
statement has been given out for publication by the Marshal during his s

MARSHAL FERDINAND FOCH, ALLIED COMMANDER-IN-CHIEF, WHO
SENT MESSAGE TO ANN ARBO R RESIDENTS AND STUDENTS
WHILE PASSING THROUGH THE CITY YESTERDAY.

CONCERT SERIES
STAR-TS TONIGHT

Program in Hill Auditorium
Greatest Musical Ylear
Yet Held

Starts]

ESTELLE LIEBLING, SOPRANO,
WILL ASSIST WITH SOLOS
When the Detroit Symphony orches-1
tra, Ossip Gabrilowitsch, conductor,
and Estelle Liebling, soprano soloist,
begin their concert at 8 o'clock to-
night in Hill auditorium, they will
have started the Extra concert series
on the greatest season in its history.
Never before has Ann Arbor had op-
portunity to hear an orchestra of the
high rank of the Detroit organization
throughout an entire concert course.
The orchestra and soprano have
prepared the following program:
Overture, "Der Freischutz"....Weber
Eighth Symphony, Opus 93, in F
major .................Beethoven
Allegro vivace e con brio
Allegretto scherzando
Tempo di menuetto
Allegro vivace
Overture, "Phedre"........Massenet
Intermission
Aria from "Etienne Marcel"....
....................Saint-Saens
Aria from "Conchita" ......Zandonai
Estelle Liebling
Hungarian Dances..........Brahms

MADISON TIKES.
Coupon Receipts Must Be Turned in
Between 2 and 8 O'clock This
Afternoon
SPECIAL LAST TRAIN FOR
CHICAGO SATURDAY NIGHT
Coupon receipts for the special to
Madison next Saturday will be ex-
changed for regular railroad tickets
from 2 to 8 o'clock this afternoon and
evening in the lobby of the Union by
a representative of the Michigan Cen-
tral railroad. Reservations for Pull-
mans can also be made at the same
time and all those who intend to make
the trip are urged to turn in their re-
quests by Union authoirties, in order
that full accommodations can be pro-
vided by the railroad companies in ad-
vance.
A change in time has been made ne-
cessary by the requirements of the
Chicago and Northwestern railroad.
The last regular train that can be
taken out of Madison on Saturday
night, according to present regula-
tions, is at 6:30, arriving in Chicago
at 10:30 o'clock. Students who wish
to stay over till later on Saturday
night can leave on the special at 10
o'clock. They can leave Chicago at
any time up to midnight, on the train
that Will arrive in Ann Arbor at 7
o'clock Monday morning.
A special car will be provided for
University women.
BARRISTERS HOLD
INITIATION TODAY
Prof. E. N. Durfee, of the Law
school, will be initiated this afternoon
as an honorary member of Barristers,
honorary senior law society. The fol-
lowing seniors have been elected to
membership: C. J. Smith, F. D. Car-
rol, C. E. Turner, W. C. Palmer, G.
D. Anderson, P. 0. Strawhecker, E. C.
Davis, C. H. Daley, Harry Sunley, and
G. S. Hollenbeck.-

CROWD OF 10,000
CHEERS WAR HERO
Huge Gathering Greets Foclh as Train
Stops at Michigan Central
Station
EX-PRES. HUTCHINS GIVES
MESSAGE FOR UNIVERSITY
Lining the hills, covering every
available box car and roof, clinging
to telephone poles, a crowd of more
than 10,000 greeted Marshal Foch dur-
ing, his short stay here. Before 10
o'clock the mob began to gather and
shortly after 11 o'clock, when the Mar-
shal's special train pulled in, every
point of vantage had been siezed. A
sprinkling of uniforms was reminis-
cent of war time gatherings. As
Marshal Foch's car slipped through
the crowd, the mob greeted him with
a "Marshal Foch locomotive."
A committee headed by President-
emeritus Harry B. Hutchins greeted
the great French soldier and escorted
him to the platform on the hillside.
Standing between the tri-color of
France and the Stars and Stripes of
the United States, President-emeritus
Hutchins introduced the Marshal, pre-
sented him with a testimonial from the
University and spoke as follows:
Marshal Foch: "In the necessary
absence of our President, which we all
keenly regret, I have been asked to
convey to you greetings and welcome
from the city of Ann Arbor and the
University of Michigan. It is an hon-
or, sir, to have you with us even for a
few moments. This will always be a
red-letter day in our calendar. You
will realize this when I say to you'
that more than 12,000 alumni and
graduates of the University served in
the World war for liberty and dem-
ocracy under your distinguished lead-
ership and that more than 200 made
the supreme sacrifices. On behalf of
the Regents of the University, the
faculties, and the students, I present
to you this testimonial of greeting and
appreciation."
Marshall Expresses Thanks
The Marshal accepted the envelope
tied with a yellow and blue streamer
and expressed his thanks, bowing to
the surrounding crowd. The testimon
lal was prepared under the direction
of Prof. Rene Talamon, of the French
department, and was executed in 11
(Continued on Page Eight)

in America. The American Legio:
has desired that no statements b
sought for by newspaper men so a
to save the Marshal as much effor
as possible, and in accordance witl
this it has a special publicity depari
ment from which all stories concern
ing him come. However, through th
courtesy of Francis Drake, who wa
born in Detroit and who is at presen
a resident of Paris, the above mes
sage was allowed to be made publiE
Mr. Drake is making this trip at th
special request of Marshal Foch. Dur
ing the war he was a lieutenant-col
onel of the Engineering corps of th
U. S. A., serving as chief of staff t
General Charles G. Dawes and a
chairman of the Technical board c
the A. E. F. He is a commander c
the Legion of Honor and an office
of the Belgian Order of the Crown.
Marshal Foch and his company ar
rived at' Camp Custer at 8 o'cloc
yesterday morning, where he unveil
ed a memorial tablet in the dedical
ing exercises of the Roosevelt Me
morial hospital. This hospital, whic
will be finished some time in Decen
ber, will take care of 350 patients. I
is to be used by ex-soldiers who ar
in a, tubercular condition.
Groesbeck Gives Welcome
The Marshal was ,welcomed by Go
Alexander Groesbeck, who spoke fo
the people of the state. In his repl
the Marshal said:
"I thank the governor of Michigan
I thank the people of Michigan, fc
the wonderful care they are givin
OUR soldiers."
He then unveiled the tablet an
Lieut. Paul Martin, deputy commani
er of the American Legion of Mich
gan, made-a speech of thanks. Whe
the train of the Marshal first reaclh
Camp Custer, a salute was- fired i
his honor, and the General George,
Custer Post 54 of the American L
* gion of Battle Creek, fife and dru
corps, which won first place at t
recent national convention of tl
American Legion at Kansas Cit
played while he went to make a tot
of inspection of the hospital.
Marshal Reserved
Throughout the ceremonies tl
Marshal was very unpretentious ay
reserved, answering the many gree
ings with a quiet smile and an occ
sional salute. His face was lin
with deep furrows and his %arge ey
balls were set in deep hollows, F
- suggesting his 40 years of hard stu
and labor, which were to finally e
i able him to conquer the greatest w
- machine the world has ever produc(
(Continued on Page Eight)

Blletin

At a late hour last night no an-
nouncement could be made by Uni-
versity authorities as to whether Arm-
istice day will be considered a whole
holiday by the University. Announce-
ment regarding this matter will be
made in tomorrow's Daily.
Aero Club Meets Tonight
Members of the Aero club will meet
at 7:15 o'clock tonight in room 325 of
the Union. E. A. Starker, formerly
witi. the Stout Aeornautical Labora-
tories of Detroit, will deliver an ad-
dress on "Aeroplane Stability."

b

Lecture

Course

Tickets

i

At Booths on
the Campus,

T

0

on sale

A

V

Prices $2.50 and $3.00 for
Series of Ten Numbers

I'__________

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