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November 04, 1921 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-11-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY FRIDAY, NOVEMBE.R 4, 1s

OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY
OF MICHIGAN
Pulished every morning exc pIGMonday during the Univer-
sity year by the Roard in Control 4f Student Pubiations
MEMBER OF THE AS3OCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the tise for
republication of all news dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
credited in this paper and the local news published therein.
Entered at the postoffice at Anin Arbor, Michigan, as second
class matter.
Suoscription by carrier or mail, $3.5y.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press building, Maynard Street.
Phones: Business, 960 Editorial. 2414.
Communications not to exceed 3oo words, if signed, the sig-
nature not necessarily to appear in print, but as an evidence of
faith, and notices of events will be pub~lished in The Daily at the
discretion 'f the Editor, if left at or mailed to 'he Daily office.
Unsigned communications will receive no consideration o man-
uscript will be returned unless the writer incloses postage.
The Daily does not necessarily endorse the sentiments ex-
pressed in the communications.
What's Going On" notices will not be received after 6 o'clock
on the evening preceding insertion.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
MANAGING EDITOR........... BREWSTER P. CAMPBELL
Assistant Managing EditorH..................H h W. Hitchcock
City Editor...............................f P. Lovejoy, Jr.
Night Editors-
M. B. Stahl G. P. Overton
R. E. Adams Hughston McBain
Paul Watzel Edward Lambrecht
P. H. McPike
Editorials .T. J Whinery, L. A. Kern, S. T. Beach. E. R. Meiss
Sunday Magazine. Editor..........................T. S. Sargent
Sporting Editor ................................. George Reindel
Women's Editor ............................. Elizabeth Vickery
Humor Editor.................................... E R. Meiss
Assistants
Harry B. Grundy John Dawson Ben H. Lee, Jr.
Wallace F. Elliott Sidney B. Coates Julian Mack
M. A. Klaver Lowell S. Kerr Howard Donahue
Dorothy Whipple H. E. Howlett Art~old Fleig
Marion Koch Katherine Montgomery
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
BUSINESS MANAGER.............. VERNON F. HILLERY
Advertising.........................F. M. Heath, A. J. Parker
Publication .............................Nathan W. Robertson
Accounts................................. John J. Hamels, Jr.
Circulation................................... Herold C. Hunt
Assistants
Burr L. Robbins Richard Cutting H. Willis Heidbreder
W. Cooley James Prentiss W. Kenneth Galbraith
L. Beaumont Parks Maurice Moule J. A. Dryer
Walter Scherer ar in Goldring Richard Heidemann
Edw. Murane Tyler Stevens T. H. Wolfe

Figures and sentiment are available to show that
Michigan is a real University. The two combina-
tions are unfortunate, but not irreconcilable. The
fact that it does cost considerable to live here makes
more difficult the problem of earning that living.
The fact that this is Michigan means that the men
and women who come here, willing to work that
they may study, are above and superior to the aver-
age.
Many students who merit the positions they
hold, in being above the average in their class-
rooms, in their campus life, and in their general
service to the world at large, are unable to continue
their studies here because of the lack of jobs. Some
students ask for and take positions, when not really
needing them. That is unfortunate. Some people
fail to foresee the necessity of help until the very
hour wh n it is needed, and this does not lead to
the best man for the right place. But these two
items are, considering the whole dilemma, a small
part. The big feature is, that there has not been
sufficient demand for student help, and yet, in prac-
tically every case, the work and spirit of the stu-
dents has been adequate and fine.
Michigan will lose men and women because of
the lack of work for these men and women. That
loss will be a great one, and it is one both deplor-
able and needless.
Have you not some way, in which students may
work, that they may study? And will you not tell
those who have these positions available, that those
who wish to fill them are able, willing, and worth
while?
JUGGLING TOO MANY ACTIVITIES
Once upon' a time two desirable seats presented
themselves to an ambitious youth with a yearning
for "sittin' pretty". Undecided as to which one to
choose, he tried to take both at once. As a result
he landed between them on the floor.
Isn't it true that a similar fate awaits most stu-
dents who try to succeed in a number of activi-
ties? The ones who are not content with sticking
to dramatics try their hand at athletics or publica-
tions. Time passes rapidly. Soon these students
become sophomores, then juniors, and when grad-
uation comes they have nothing to show for their
efforts but a flurry here and there which has re-
sulted in their accomplishing practically nothing.
Trying to succeed in many lines, they have met with
scarcely more than partial success in any.
On the other hand, most of the men and women
on the campus who have arrived some place have
done so by concentrating their energy in one field
until they have mastered it. Then success has
crowned their efforts; and as a result they have
often found themselves installed in important posi-
tions on the campus aside from their particular
specialty.
Written in the archives of the University are the
names of a few persons, who have met success in
practically every field of endeavor on the campus.
But these persons are the exceptions and their cases
do not prove anything. By far the majority who
have attempted it have landed on the floor in one
way or another. It is a logical and profitable plan
to stick to one activity.

II,

Log Log Slide Rules

AT
GRAHAM' S
B~oth ends of the diagonal Ipalk

iI

:

j

DETROIT UNITED LINES
Ann Arbor and Jack.,on
T!E TABLE
(E4agtern Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars-6.os a.
I., 7:05 a. m.. 8:io a. in. and hourly to 9 :o
Jackson Express Cars (local stops of Ann
-rlmr. 9:48 'a. m, and every two hours to
9:48 p. In.
:ocal Cars East Bound-5 :55.a.m., 7 :oo a.
n and every two hours to 9:oo p. mn.. ii :oo
Sn. To Ypsilanti only-r r :4o p. M., 12.25
a. in., r : r5 a. mn.
o Salize, change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars West Bound-7:50 a. m., 2:40 p.
To Jackson and Kalamazoo-Limited cars:
:48, 10 :4S a. in., 12 :48. 2:48. 4 :48.
To Jackson and Lansing-Limited: 8:48
Daily Want Ads Pay.-Adv.
Patronize our Advertisers.-Adv.

1921
6
13
20
27

NOVEMBER
1 2 3
7 8 9 10
14 15 16 17
21 22 23 24
28 29 30

1921
4 5;
11 12
18 19
25 26

Calkins Fletcher Drug Co. and the Cushing
Drug Co. invite the inspection o
TREBOPRICE
$6.00
PIPE

rL

NOTICE TO MEN
We do all kinds of high-class Hat
work at pre-war prices. Hats turned
inside out, with all new trimings,
are as good as new.
FACTORY HAT STORE
617 PACKARD STREET
Telephone 1792
Patronize Daily Advertisers.-Adv.
Try a Daily Want Ad. It pays.-Adv.

Ivory
stopper
in the stemn
stops all
moisture

Agents forthe United States and Canada
GROSVENOR NICHOLAS & CO., Inc.
12 East 48th Street New York City

I

_

KIRSCHBAUM

CLOTHES

- FALL AND WINTER

192,

--------

Persons wishing to secure information concerning news for
any issue of The Daily should see the night editor, who has full
charge of all news to be printed that night.
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 1921

Night Editor-R. E. ADAMS, JR.
JOURNALISM'S BLACK SHEEP
Newspaper journalism has during the last decade
made admirable strides towards the lofty position
of an acknowledged profession. From year to
year the percentage of college men entering jour-
nalistic offices has materially increased.' The daily
articles have evolved to a4-place where they can
boast to a certain extent of literary as well as news
value. And finally, editors and reporters have set
up a -code of standards whereby they publish not
merely "what the public wants", as they used to
term it, but both ."what the public wants" and
"what is best for the public". Such has been the
progress of journalism.
But just as medicine has its quacks and law has
its shysters, so the profession of journalism is often
discredited by unworthy members in its ranks. A de-
plorable example of this black sheep of journalism
appeared as a result of Michigan's loss to Ohio
State in football recently. Shortly after the game a
state newspaper printed an article containing sweep-
ing and denunciatory accusations concerning the
University of Michigan, statements attributed to
and since utterly denied by the governor of this
state. To refute such groundless and undeliber-
ated accusations as this article sets forth would be
a waste of time. Its effect upon the democratic
reputation of Michigan can be only negligible. But
the story furnishes an eloquent example of yellow
sensationalism and unscrupulous mis-quoting of the
sort which for so many years has prevented jour-
nalism from taking its proper place in the esteem of
the public alongside of the other professions.
Such distorting of facts and misrepresenting of
authorities ip one instance does more damage to
journalism than a hundred well-written articles can
hope to repair. If the publishing of false statements
affected only the newspaper in which the state-
ments appeared the matter would be less serius, but
under present conditions the whole personnel of the
newspaper profession must suffer condemnation for
inefficiency and unscrupulousness because of the
fact that one individual, misplaced in modern jour-
nalism, went out in the spirit of thirty years ago to
dig up news, and came back witha sensational yarn.
at the expense of veracity, honesty, and the jour-
nalistic profession.
HEI.P THEM STAY
The proper co-ordination between positions, or
jobs, and students, or workers, has ceased to be a
mere problem. It may no longer be referred to as
an important situation. It is a dilemma. There are
more students financially short this year than ever
before.
These men and women have come to Michigan
for the fundamentals of an education. They must
want this rather strongly, for they are willing to
work in order to study.
Almost any class of worker can be obtained, in
varying degrees of experience, among the student
body who want and can work. Facilities for unit-
ing the students with the jobs are at hand - Dean
Bursley's. office is taking care of that end. More
than i,ooo applications are now on file. Have those
who could and might use student labor come
through ?
Figures have been quoted to show that Ann Ar-
bor ranks foremost in the highest living costs.

here's a right way in clothes-
buying-and another way.
Our way and the Kirschbaum
way is this: qualty, honest price,
full value, guaranteed satisfac-

tion.

Suits, topcoats, overcoats

the Telescope

I

$30 to $45

The Father's Dilemma
The father thought the matter o'er,
He'd sent his son to school,
He had worked and slaved in his fresh fish-store
Just to spoil the boy like a gilded fool.
A husky youth his son had been,
And a massive man he returned,
But the germ of knowledge could find no way in
To a head where genius had never burned.
The fish store helped this youngster too
In football competition,
For at the start he wriggled through
And won a team position.
But, thought the father, "What a fool
I've been to slave and spend my jack
To send an only son to school,
And all I get's a quarter-back."
We may lose our faith in boarding houses, but,
thank Heaven, we still believe in Santa.
-Afra Dighty.
Quoth Eppie Taff:
They're playing taps
O'er Teddy Jones,
They caught him rolling
Loaded bones. - Ichabod.
Our Freshman Friend
Was going to give the right of way to some upper-
classmen but he saw that none of the other fresh-
men did it, so he decided not to.
Songs of the Immortals
(And those who are a little more vulnerable.)
Betty V. is
Full of joy,
Since she's been
To Illinois.
Hugo Awn.
Speaking of song hits Waldo says he learned to
play the catarrh at the nasal academy.
- Gus Tow.
Famous Closing Lines
"Here's some inside dope," said the doctor as he
hande his patient a pill. ERM.

FRED

W. GROSS

ANN ARBOR

lB __ _.. _ _. __ -..._ _. ___ A l-. _

1

"When You iuy, lu2 Quality
Regarding prices--we
always haveinvited comparison
with any house in the country
providing the factor "quality"
is given due consideration.

WAGNER
For Men
STATE STR

& COMPANY
Since 1848
ET A T LIBERTY

E

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