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November 03, 1921 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-11-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

ican University Union In
iris, Founded For War Needs,
Is flade Strong Peace Agency

(By Delbert Clark)
unded to fill a war-time-need, the
ican University Union in Europe,
nued in time of peace, is strong-
trenched in Paris as a potent
-time agency. From a modest
.ning, the Union has grown to
size proportions, till it is a fact-
be reckoned with in all rela-
between American and Euirope-
niversities.
e general object of the Union is
rve as a bond between the uni-
tiese of the United States jand,'
of European nations. In par.-
ir it seeks to encourage the at-
nce of American students at the
rsities of France, Great Britain,
and other European countries,
to facilitate the attendance of
pean students at American insti-
ns of higher learning.
Supported by Colleges
e Union is largely supported by
are known as college member-
These memberships are held
olleges and universities of the
d States, on payment of an an-
fee, varying in proportion to the

size of the institution. Other revenue
producing memberships also exist.
Under the auspices of the Union
are administered a number of the fel-
lowships for American students in
European universities, notably--the
American Field Service fellowships
for French universities. This sys-
tem of fellowships is planned as a
memorial to the 127 members of the
American Field service who lost their
lives during the war. The plan is to
found one fellowship for each of these
rmen. Some.30 have already been es-
tablished
Serves as Clearing-house
The Union serves as a clearing-
house for all relations between
European ani American universities,
social as well as- academic. A build-
ing is maintained which cares for
every phase of the life of the Ameri-
can student in Europe, especially in
France. A library is in operation,
student dances are regular events,
smokers are held for men students,
and in general a line of activity is
pursued nol unlike, on a smaller scale,
that of the Michigan Union.
The municipality of Paris has "of-

earn New York's Latest Craze-
The Frisco FoX Trot
at
WUERT -ARCADE

If you
or

are hungry,
are thirsty,

If

you
Or

fared the organization the sum of
600,000 francs for the purpose of a
site for a new building. A drive is
to be initiated soon for $70000, half
of % hich will be used in the construc-
tion of an adequate building, and the
other half for a permanent endow-
ment. This will enable the Union to
widen the scope of its activities, and
in ease its usefulness to American
students in Europe, as well as to the
institutions of learning in the United
States which in large measure sus-
tain it.
HESTON SUED_11 LAWYER
Detroiter Charges Slander on Forced
Return of Fee To Client
Judge William M. Heston, of the
recorder's court of Detroit, former
football star, captain of the champion
1904 Varisty, and halfback on Camp's
all-time all-American team, has been
made defendant in a $200,000 slander
suit filed last week by Carl M. Weide-
man, of Detroit.
The charge is that Heston "has on
occasions too numerous to mention
held this plaintiff (Weideman) up to
public ridicule and disgrace, and
caused this plaintiff great mental
anguish and embarrassment by un-
judicial, illegal, unlawful, uncivil, dis-
courteous, and indecent acts in the
presence and hearing of divers good
and worthy citizens of said city-"
The principal cause for the action
see"s to be the circumstances that
center around the return of $500 of
a fee that Judge Heston compelled
Weideman to return to a client who
had been tried and acquitted by
Ieston.
TESTS UNDER WAY
TO STOP COMING
SHORTAGE IN 'GAS'
With the gasoline shortage coming
nearer the acute state every day, men
all over the world are trying to im-
prove the present gasoline motor in
efficiency.
"It will not be many years before
the gasoline refining problem will be
much more serious than it is now,"
says Prof. Eugene H. Leslie, of the
chemical engineering department.
Prof. Walter E. Lay, of the mechani-
cal engineloring department, is co-
operating with Prof. Leslie in experi-
mental work on internal combustion
engifies. To study this phenomenon
a special one-cylinder motor has been
constructed in such a way that pic-
tures can be taken of the action in
the cylinder, spectroscope observa-
tions can be made, and various pres-
sure time cards be worked out.
With this motor a high compression
of 105 pounds is obtained and it is
hoped that a pressus of 180 pounds
will be secured in the future by use
of a variable compression device.
INCREASE SHOWN
IN MEXICAN TRADE
Mexico iCty, Oct. 15.-(By Mail.)-
The American Chamber of Commerce
here is authority for the statement
that the United States sold to Mexico
in the past 12 months more by $40,-
000,000 than the whole trade of Mexico
was just before the revolution.
The upward trend of silver has also
had its good effect in Mexico and the
transportation problem is said to be
gradually growing better, !although
there is still room for vast improve-
ment.
As an indication of the ilI-effects
of poor transportation is the fact that

SUnitedStates lumbermen last year
sold to Mexico almost $14,000,000
worth of wood products, half of which
was pure lumber despite the presence
in -he republic pf huge tracts of
forests.
ALUMNI OFFICE WORKING
ON WAR SERVICE RECORDS
An effort is being made by the
Alumni catalogue office to secure the
name and service record of every
Michigan man or woman who served
in the World war. Not only graduates
of the University but students as well
are to be included in the military rost-
er which is now being compiled. At
present the list of former Michigan
students and alumni who died in the
seivice totals 237.

Purloined Signs
Now Adorn Rooms
"Is this a concentrated plan of Ann
Arbor?" somebody asked, taking a
peep into the upper half of a league
house Tuesday.
"Oh no, we're being kittenish," was
the answer. It was a geographical
'kitten' to say the least. Every door
was boasting a new door plate, large,
enameled signs plucked from the city
thoroughfare. "Cambridge Rd." stood
next door to "Division St." In this
little system of thoroughfares, and
"State St." competed with "Cheever
Court."
If there had been more doors there
would have been more streets on view.
All that was lacking was the traffic
cop, and Tuesday being the 'morning
after' the Hallowe'en acquisitions the
traffic problem did not prove serious.
The inquisitive one from the foot
of the stairs asked, "Where did you
get them?"
"Oh, we got them,,you see it was
dark." And nothing more was said.
FORMER FACULTY MEMBER
GETS PARIS APPOINTMENT
Dr. W. D. Johnston, instructor in
the history department of the Uni-
versity from 1894 to 1897, has been
appointed as librarian of the Ameri-
can Library in Paris and European
representative of the American Li-
brary association. Following his
service at Michigan Dr. Johnston was
connected with Brown University, the
Library of Congres, Columbia Uni-
versity, and the St. Paul public li-
brar.
The American Library in Paris is
an outgrowth of the war activities of
the American Library association and
has for its object the establishment of
an authorative source of information
for all people in France who are in-
terested i. America.
OH, BOYS! WOULDN'T YOU
GIVE A LOT TO BE THERE,

THE "Y" IN
AT
LANE HALL
BEST QUALITY OF FOOD
Few extra places, due to fraternity
moving into their own house.
Open to men and women.

11

I I

k _ w

If you just need a friend-
Drop in at that friendly place.
TUTTLE'S LUNCH ROOM

r

;{

Coblenz, Oct. 16.-(By Mail.)-
Champagne at 60 cents a bottle in
Coblenz is one of the Joys of the
American occupation as the result of
the continued depreciation of the
mark.
"What will you have, Chartreuse or
Benedictine?" asked a buck private
who was entertaining a party of five
at dinner, the other night. "I want
to finish this thing royally," he added.
They all hid Chartreuse. It cost
the buck 35 cents.

, .

PICTURES OF FOOTBALL MEN

WE'VE GOT 'EM ALL

STUD ENTS
We carry a general line of supplies to meet your requirements.
PRICE, QUALITY and SERVICE
STUDENTS SUPPLY STORE
1111 So. UNIVERSITY AVE.

Individual or Group

Pictures

719 N. UNIVERSITY

F

Touching upon the
points of superiority

They'r
-a go
-not
-sort
--Viv
-Inec

e Vivacious!
)od smoke
dried out, you know
of 'fresh, lively,
-acous, is the word
om-pv-r-bly fine!
8L

The- convenient location of the
Arcade cafeteria is only one
of its many features !J

M orE5I

N

4-j

GH LS
83ended in the Good Old English Way

It's upstairs in
Nickels' Arcade

1Hill 111111111111111[Jill III[Jill II111111Hill HIM111111111111111111IIIt1lNttilUH111t11U

DANCES FRIDAY AND SATURDAY
Tickets at Graham's, Slater's and Wahr's uptown
Fischer Drug Co. and Coodyear Drug Co. downtown

a j t ot u eu tM ru uru E i i r E m utu u u i utEit

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