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November 03, 1921 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-11-03

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THE WEATHER ASSOCIATED
. FAIM N SOMWA A RC A U , BPRESS
WARWERTOAYu ,DAY ANDNIGHT WIRE
TODAY -SERVICE
VOL. XXXII: No. 34. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 1921 PRICE FIVE CENTS

I,

ft

FAGAN'S STORY IS
BRANDED ENTIRELY
LACKING IN TRUTH
GOV. GROESBECK AND PRES. BUR.
TON DISCLAIM PRESS
REPORT
NO INTIMATION MADE
ABOUT "INVESTIGATION"
"University Thoroughly Democratic,"
Declares President in
Statement
Lansing, Kich., 4:45 p. m.,
Nov. 2, 1921.
B. P. CampbelA
Managing Editor, Michigan Daily,
Ann Arbor, Mich.
Nothing to newspaper story. Con.
sider that University affairs are in
the hands of Board of Regents.
ALEX. J. GROESBECK,
Governor.
Social favoritism, snobbery, and
class distinction are potent factors in
determining the personnel of Michi-
gan's football team, and permeate all
branches of University activity, ac-
cording to Peter F. Fagan, in the Do-
wagiac Daily News of Oct. 31.
He further states that Gov. Alex J.
Groesbeck expressed himself after the
O. S. U. game as being thoroughlyl

.Five Landlubbers
Mlake Quarterdeck
Five shivering landlubbers,-clad in
sea-going togs, and with life-belts
strapped around their waists,-demon-
strated their nautical ability and
gained their way -to the Quarterdeck
at 4 o'clock yesterday afternoon un-
der the Engineering arch.
The men initiated are Edgar Brink-
man, '22E, Stephen Johnson, Jr., '23E,
C. K. Watrous, '22E, Edward C. Dav-
idson, '22E, and D. D. Atkinson, Jr.,
'23E.
A banquet for the initiates was held
in the Union at 6 o'clock'following the
ceremonies. The principal speakers
were Profs. H. C. Sadler and E. M.
Bragg, of- the marine engineering de-
partment.

SITE CHOSEN FOR ,
CLEMENTS, LIBRARYI

I t

WORK ON MEMORIAL BEGINS
FORE COMING OF
WINTER

BE. {

Hold Tryouts For
Fall Band Bounce
Michigan's annual fall Band Bounce
under the auspices of the University
of Michigan Band association will be
given Wednesday, Nov. 9, in Hill aud-
itorium.. Tryouts for the several acts
are being held this week, according
to S. R. Bidwell, '24L, manager of the
band.
The proceeds of the entertainment
will be used in sending the Varsity
band to the Wisconsin game.
The following committees have been
named: entertainment, G. E. Korten,
'22E, J. F. Sander, '23M; program, W.
H. Lightbody, '23E; tickets, R. V.
Libonati, '24L, and posters, J. C.
House, '24L.
COUNCIL RULES ON
TCE C

DEANS' CONFERENCE PRlEPARES FOR
WA R AAINST HIGH LIVING COST;
PRICES FOUND FAS ABOVE NORMAL

TWO STORY STRUCTUREI
WILL COST $175,000I

Building and Collection of
Worth Half Million Gift
of Regent

BooksI

PROF., VAN TYNE
GOING TO1 INDIA

Will Gather Material
Legislature of
Country

for Book on
That

disgusted with Michigan's
it was a disgrace to the
that he was going to make

team, that
state, and
a personal

investigation of general conditions at
the University.
"Banish Society Bug"
The article closes with the follow-
ing statement: "He (the governor)
and the rest of the state officers have
indicated, without reservation or di-
plomacy, that the University is go-
ing to find a way to be democratic, to
eliminate a deal of class and style
and to banish utterly the society bug
or it is going to live on bread and
water until it is too poor to be
proud." The same article was print-
ed in Monday's Grand Rapids News.
President Marion L. Burton, in a
statement toThe Daily,gavean un-
qualified denial of the assertions re-
garding what the governor is alleged
to have said after the Ohio State
game.
Diselaims Conversation
"No such conversation took place,"
said the President. "The governor,
like the rest of us, was sorely disap-
pointed at the result of the game,
and wished it might have been other-
wise, but he certainly did not say to
me, as the article claims, that the
team washa, disgrace to the state, and
he said nothing during all our conver-
sation which could possibly be con-
strued to mean that the University
was laying itself open to the charge
of snobbery and favoritism.
"Nothing was said to indicate that
he contemplated any investigation of
'conditions' such as Is referred to in
the article. This has been a rather
dull fall for news, and as long as
news must be available, the University
probaby will have to come. in for its
share.
"While the cost of living is high at
Ann Arbor and must be reduced, any-
one who knows the University realiz-
es without qualification that It is
thoroughly democratic, and a place
where every student gets a real
chance. 'Ability and personality, not
money and social position, determine
a man's opportunity at Michigan. Any
person who knows American universi-
ties knows that real democracy pre-
vails here."
EVANS TO GIVE
FIFTH RECITAL
. Harry Russell Evans will give the
fifth twilight organ recital at 4:15
o'clock this afternoon in Hill auditor-
ium. This is the second time Mr.
Evans has appeared in the recital se-
ries this year.
His program is as follows:
Sonata in the Style of Handel....
............... Wolstenholme
Largo-Allegro
Berceuse in D fiat .........Dickinson
Caprice in A .................Kinder
Grand Fugue on Bach ......Bach
Little Haakon (by request......
................. Skinner-Evans
Lamnputation (by request)..Guilmant

LEAVES NOV. 15 FOR STAY
OF THREE MONTHS ABROAD
Prof. C. H. Van Tyne, of the his-
tory department, will leave Ann Ar-
bor on Nov. 15 to spend the winter
in India for the purpose of writing a
book on the legislative assembly of
the country. The trip is the result of
the visit which Alexander F. Whyte
made to the University two years ago
while on a speaking tour through the
universities of the country. At the
time Mr. Whyte was a member of par-
liament and while here was enter-
tained by Professor Van Tyne. Since
the visit he has been appointed presi-
dent of the legislative assembly which
Professor Van Tyne is going to study.
It was at his request that Professor
Yan Tyne planned the trip.
The assembly is a governmental
experiment by England and one which
she is anxious to perfect. It is com-
posed of native men. Through the as-
sembly it is hoped the country can be
made self-governing in the future.
During his three months' stay in
the country Professor Van Tyne will
make his headquartersain Delhi. Oth-
er books which he has written are
"The Loyalists in the American Rev-
olution", "The American Revolu-
tion", and "A School History of the
United States". He was also the edi-
tor of the letters of Daniel Webster
and has contributed to several ency-
clopedias.
CAMPAIGN WOULD MEAN
NEW ENGINEER SYSTEM
A plan for a campaign, which, if
carried out, would revolutionize engi-
neering education at Michigan was
discussed at an informal luncheon at
the Hudson Motor Car. company, in
Detroit, Monday, at which the honor
guests were President Marion L.
Burton and Prof. A. E. White,, of the
chemical engineering department.
The purpose of the meeting was to
discuss a revision of the engineering
courses that engineers may be more
directly prepared for industrial work.
It is not intended in this plan to elim-
inate the theoretical courses, but to
modify them to a certain extent.
Among the prominent manufactur-
ers who attended the meeting were:
Edsel B. Ford, Herbert H. Rice, vice-
president of the General Motors cor-
poration; Howard E. Coffin, vice-pres-
ident of the Hudson Motor Car com-
pany; Fred J. Haynes, president of
Dodge Bros.; M. W. Neal, treasurer of
the Acme Lead works.

Definite plans for the Clements Me-
morial library have been formulated
with the selection of the building site
and the drawing up of specifications,
and it is expected that the actual con-
struction will begin in the course of
a few weeks.
The cost of the building will be
approximately $175,000. It will be a
two story structure, 95 feet by 80 feet,
facing South University avenue to the
east of the President's home and di-
rectly- opposite Martha Cook dormi-
tory. One large reading room will
extend across the entire front of the
structure and back of this main room
there will be smaller reading rooms
and book stacks.
The exterior of the building will
present a stone finish somewhat sim-
ilar to Alumni Memorial hall. There
will be a basement under the entire
building.
Part of the old engineering building
will be-torn down in order to make
room for the new structure, and ac-
cording to present plans this work
will be commenced before the ground
begins to freeze.
The library, together with the col-
lection of books, is the gift of Wil-
liam L. Clements, regent of the Uni-
versity. The collection is said to be
the third finest Americana in the
world today and is valued at $500,000.
VAN EVERY, 124 WINS
OPERA POSTER CONTEST
CHOICE MADE AFTER COMMITTEE
CONSIDERS FOURTEEN
DESIGNS
Marion M. Van Every, '24, is the win-
ner of the poster contest for the 1922
Union opera, "Make It for Two," ac-
cording to the final decision of the
committee in charge as announced yes-
terday. The choice was made after
considering more than 14 designs sub-
mitted by students Monday. It will be
used for all the large billboard post-
ers, for the regular advertising and
newspaper display, and for the designs
on the cover of the opera program.
Because of the high quality of the
work done this year and the large
number of interesting designs that
were submitted, Mimes has decided to
place 10 of the posters on display at
Graham's State street book store for
three days. The winning poster will
only be there today, however, as it
must be sent to the electrotypers in
Cincinnati, O., as soon as possible.
The poster that was given first place
in the competition is done in a yellow
background, with red lettering. It
represents a ball room scene, with a
number of vari-colored lanterns plac-
ed over its face.
The design submitted by Elwood C.
Fayfield, '25, was given second place.
The lettering is red and black, with
the figure of an oriental dancer in the
center done in the same colors. The
third choice was turned in by Harry
E. Yost, '22.
THREE ADDED TO
'THOUSAND GREAT'
Three members of the geology de-
partment were omitted from the list
of University faculty men taken from
Cattell's "American Men of Science",
and published in Tuesday's Daily.
Prof. William H. Hobbs, director of
-the geological laboratory and geologi-
cal museum, now on a trip around the
world, is listed one of the leading
authorities in his field. Prof. Ermine
C. Case, of the geology and paleon-
tology departments, is given as one

of the foremost paleontologists of the
world. The third man mentioned is
Frank Leverett, lecturer on glaciall
geology.I

Misstatement of Class Will
Applicant Last in
Preference

INVESTIGATION SHOWS MANY
STUDENTS ARE AT FAULT

Applications for tickets to the foot-'
ball games on which the class of the
applicant is misstated -will receive
last preference, according to a ruling
of the Student council at a meetingj
held last evening at the Union. Com-]
plaints of poor ticket distribution for
the Ohio ' State game led to an . in-'
vestigation of student applications by
a committee appointed by thg Student
council with the result that many stu-
dents were found to be giving the
wrong classes.
A committee was appointed to meet
the officers of all classes and help
with plans for collecting class dues.t
This committee, which consists of
Thornton W. Sargent Jr., '22, chair-
man, Preston H. Scott, '22, and Thom-
as Lynch, '23E, will also instruct the
new officers in their duties and as-
sist in organizing the class functions.
Another committee, consisting of R-.
F. Wieneke, '22, chairman, Ralph Ry-
chener, '22, and Thomas Lynch, '23E,
was directed to find a means of rais-
ing money to send the freshman foot-
ball squad to the Wisconsin game.
Thomas Lynch, '23E, was elected re-
cording secretary of the council and
will assume his duties at once. I
DEAN CABOT OUTLINES
FACTS9ABOUTC CACE
SPEAKS FIRST OF PHYSICIANS'
TENDENCY TO OVERSTATE F
CASES
All of the important facts concern-
ing the cause and prevention of can-
qer which the National Cancer week
campaign is expected to get before
the public this week were embodied
in a lecture given by Dr. Hugh Cabot,
dean of the Medical school, last night
in Natural Science auditorium.
Dr. Cabot spoke first of the tenden-
cy upop the part of physicians to
alarm people unduly by overstating
the case, in an overenthusiastic at-t
tempt to induce people to face facts.I
"The steady increase, during recent'
years, of the number of those re-
ported dying of cancer," said Dean
Cabot "is due to two things which
are not always taken into considera-
tion. People live longer lives tha
they did formerly; consequently a'
larger number are in the 'cancer
zone' between 40 and 60. Moreover,
.during recent years there have been
great strides In the increase of accur-
ate diagnosis and more efficient oper-
ative surgery, so that cases of cancerj
do not pass as other diseases, as was
the case in former years."
Dr. Cabot continued with a discus-
sion of the lack of accurate scien-
tific knowledge of the disease, which
means that little can be done in the
way of' preventative measures, the
only hope being to instruct the peo-
ple to consult competent physicians
upon the slightest symptoms, so that
the cancerous growth may be re-
moved while it is still local and has
not spread to the vital parts.
Torgerson Withdraws
W. R. Torgerson, '22M, has announc-
ed his withdrawal as nominee for
president of the new unlergraduate
medical society now lbin orranied

SENIOR NOTICE
O&ly 27 days are left in which
to have senior pictures taken.
Because of engraving contract
it is impossible to give any ex-
tension of time on these pictures.
Work Is Sought
By 400 Students
More than 1,000 students have thus
far applied for work at the Univer-
sity Employment bureau, with five or
six a day still making application.
Of the 1,000 applicants it is esti-
mated by Mrs. Mary L. Stewart, in
charge of the bureau, that nearly 400
have not secured work. Mrs. Stewart
states that the majority of the appli-
cants are willing to do any kind of
work, though a great many are skilled
workers.
Accurate information is tabulated
in regard to each applicant so that
persons or business concerns in Ann

COMMITTEE MAKES REPORT ON
COMPARATIVE CHARGES
ELSEWHERE
DRASTIC ACTION IS
DEEMED IMPERATIVE,

Co-operative Stores Discussed as
sible Solution of
Situation

Place

l

High cost of living in Ann Arbor
was the foremost topic of discussion
at the Deans' conference yesterday
morning. The consensus of opinion
was that living conditions are entirely
abnormal and prices in general are'
unwarrantably high. Steps were tak-
en to discover the most effective
means of coping with the situation.
Dean Henry M. Bates, of the Law
school, appointed at a previous meet-
ing to investigate conditions, assert-
ed that as compared with prices in
other Michigan cities, Ann Arbor
prices were far above normal. His
opinion was that 'enrollment in the
University has been and will continue
to be seriously affected by the situa-
tion, and that vigorous steps should
be taken to improve conditions.
Stand for Action
The deans are on record as strong-
ly in favor of any action which will
reduce the cost of living in Ann Ar-
bor.
Dean J. A. Bursley, Dean Henry M.
Bates, and Dean M. E. Cooley were
appointed as a committee to investi-
gate the cost of living as it affects
the University, and to make a report
of their investigations. It is the firm
conviction of the deans that drastic
action of some sort is imperative.
Discuss Solution
Co-operative stores were discussed
as a possible solution to the prob-

Arbor can get immediate
when in need of any sort of

service)
help.

r

LITTLE CAUSE TO FEAR
DIPHTHERIA EPIDEMIC

Pos.

ONLY

TWO CASES REPORTED
AMONG UNIVERSITY
STUDENTS

There is now little cause for fear

over what at first appeared to be a lem, and the opinion was expressed

local diphtheria epidemic, according
to Dr. Warren E. Forsythe, director
of the University Health service.
While there have been several cases
among the elementary school chil-
dren of the city, only two cases have
been reported among University stu-
dents.
It is important, Dr. Forsythe em-
phasized, that students be aware that
diphtheria is contagious, and that they
report to the Health service for
treatment as soon as they notice any
symptoms of the disease. He point-
ed out, however, that it was rare for
a winter to pass without at least half
a dozen cases of diphtheria being re-
ported, and no abnormal condition
calling for any unusual measures ex-
ists at this time.
PASAGEON AQUITANI

London, Nov. 2. -
George has definitely

Premier Lloyd
dacelled his

MICHIGAN ALUMNUS
OFF PRESS TODAY
How Michigan rooters journeyed to
Urbana to watch the Varsity squelch
Illinois and a full account of the con-
test will be given in the third num-
ber of the Michigan Alumnus which
comes off the press today.
In addition the issue will contain
the first installment of the report
of Paul W. Eaton, '21, on Union activ-
ities for last year. A story about,
Michigan's oldest living grad reprinted
from the Chimes will also appear and
there will be an article on the 'Mich-'
igan fresh air camp on Lake Huron.

passage on the steamer Aquitania on
which lie was to have proceeded to
the United States Nov. 5 to attend the
Washingon conference Nov. 30. This
fact was officially announced here to-
night.
It had been known here for twol
days that the critical stage the Irish
negotiations had reached probably.
would prevent Mr. Lloyd George from
sailing on Saturday. Owing to the
grave turn of Irish affairs it is not
even possible to fix a provisional -date
for the premier's sailing, but he still
intends to go to Washington at the
earliest moment possible.
FRESHMAN LITERARY CLASS
CHOOSES YEAR'S OFFICERS
The freshman literary class chose
officers for the year at an election
held yesterday in University hall.
Richard Laurence was chosen presi-
dent; Alice Powell, vice-president;
Jeane Briggs, secretary; D. E. John-
son, treasurer.
Dean Effinger Back at Work Today
Dean John R. Effinger, who has been
confined to his home for the past two
days with a cold, expects to be in his
nfficeniay

that co-operative business enterpris-
es for the benefit of the students
might become inevitable, if living
costs continued relatively as high as
at present.
The deans approved the new method
of preparing the budget submitted by
the President. By the provisions of
the new plan the Board of Regents
will have the advice of the deans as
to expenditures more than in the past
and a greater degree of co-ordination
is expected.
The afternoon of Friday, Nov. 11,
was declared a half holiday for Armis-
tice day ceremonies in consideration
of a request from former service men
of the University.
DELA STRIKE SPREAD
OF SOFT COAL MIES;
OFFICIALS ANTICIPATE CLOSE OF
TWO HUNDRED INDIANA
Indianapolis, Nov. 2.--elay in the
spread of the "protest" strike.of soft
coal iiners started today by walk-
outs of 25,000 union workers, closing
more than 200 mines in Indiana was
anticipated tonight by the officials of
the United Mine Workrs of America,
who said developments awaited the
discontinuance by operators of the un-
ion's "check off" of dues from miners
wages as directed by a federal court
injunction.
Indications were that union officials
would not call out the men scattered
throughout the soft coal fields of the
country until collection of the "check
off" was actually seized by the oper-
ators. First official reports of oper-
ators elsewhere than in Indiana reach-
ed the union headquarters here to-
night coming from the Pennsylvania
bituminous district, centering around
Pittsburgh. The message said - the
"check off" would be stopped with the
next pay day, the date of which was
not given, but which indicated a prob-
able delay in any. strike order effect-
ing 40,000 workers in that field.
Indiana 'workers, however, did not
withhold their strike to await a formal
notice from the operators. Reports to
both headquarters of operators and the
unions said that only 16 mines were in
.nn oation.

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