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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 27, 1921 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-10-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

MICHIGAN DAI

t c

tly

OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY
OF MICHIGAN
PuMished every morning except Monday during the Univer-
year by the Board in Control of Student Publications.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS"
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use for
lication of all news dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
ited in this paper and the local news published therein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
matter.
Subscription by carrier or mail, $3.5o.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press building, Maynard Street..
Phones: Business, 96o; Editorial, 2414.
Communications not to exceed 30o words, if signed, the sig-
re not necessarily to appear in print,but as an evidence of
,and notices of events will be published in The Daily at the
etion of the Editor, if left at or mailed to The Daily office.
igned communications will receive no consideration.No man
pt will be returned unless the writer incloses postage.
The Daily does not necessarily endorse the sentiments ex-
ed in the communications.
"What's Going On" notices will not be received after 6 o'clock
he evening preceding insertion.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
NAGING EDITOR ..........BREWSTER P. CAMPBELL
stant Managing Editor...............Hugh W. Hitchcock
Editor ..........-...........--.--.-+-..--.:. P. Lovejoy, jr.
ht Editors-
M. B. Stahl G. P. Overton
R. ZiAdams Hughston McBain
Paul'Watzel Edward Lambrecht ,
F. H. McPike
Sorials. .T.3 kWhinery, L. A. Kern, S. T. Beach, E. R. Meiss
day Magazine Editor......................T. S. Sargent
ting Editor ..... ...... ..............George Reindel
ren's Editor ............................E1;lizabeth Vickery
nor Editor.................................. E R. Meiiss
Assistants
Iarry B. Grundy John Dawson Ben H. Lee, Jr.
Wallace F. Elliott Sidney B. Coates Julian Mack
M. A. Klaver Lowell S. Kerr Howard Donahue
Dorothy Whipple H. 1;. Howlett Arnold Fleig
Marion Koch - Katherine Montgomery
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
SINESS MANAGER .........VERNON F. HILI)ERY

rtising......................F. M. Heath, A. J. Parker
ication.... .........N... athan W. Robertson
bunts............... ............. John J. i->amels, Jr.
slation ................................. Herold C. Hunt
. Assistants
r Robbins. Richard Cutting H. Willis Heidbreder
Cooley James Prentiss W. Kenneth Galbraith
Beaumont Parks Maurice Moule J. A. Dryer
ter Scherer sIMai tin Goldring Richard Heidemann
. Murane Tyler Stevens T. H. Wolfe

Cr
alt
,

Persons wishing to secure information concerning news for
any issue of The Daily should see the night editor, who has full
charge of all news to be printed that night.
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 27, 1921
Night Editor-HUGHSTON McBAIN
Meeting of entire Daily Upper Staff at 4:30
o'clock this afternoon.
FOOTBALL BLUES
Once upon a time there was a football coach. For
years he drilled championship teams, built up stone
walls of brawn and offensives against which the best
squads in the country could not stand for a mo-
ment. He had a "hurry-up" record, and his name
was lauded to the skies.
But, after that coach had been putting his fol-
lowers, through the victor's paces for some fifteen
or twenty years, his success began to decrease sud-
denly for a few seasons. He began- to lose games.
Consequently, the old-time cheers and. applause
gave way to groaning and complaint. Many said
the coach was stale; many wanted to throw him
out and to get a new man in his place. And the
worst of it was that, although people talked for the
most part among themselves and not openly, their
muffled cries of "get the hook" usually reached a
height at about the middle of the football season,
just when the team most needed their support.'
Finally, one student, more courageous than the
rest and perhaps harboring more deep-seated con-
victions that the day of the coach was done, aired
his views in the columns of the college daily. There-
upon did the reputed campus sentiment bid fair to
find full expression and to bring disunion and con-
sequent loss to the power behind the team, just at a
time when the force of that power was most needed.
The House of 'the University was being divided
against itself.
Such is the story of Coach Yost, past and pres-
ent. In yesterday's issue of The Daily appeared a
communication, purporting to voice a growing stu-
dent sentiment, and announcing to the world that
Coach Yost's time to retire from the gridiron has
come.
We do not pretend to claim that such an attitude
may not have been gaining in power within the past
few years. We do insist, however, that this is de-
cidedly a most inopportune time to re-open the sub-
ject. We are in the midst of a particularly worri-
some season. With admittedly one of the hardest
schedules on hand of any Conference university, we
need all our energies to be exerted as a help, not a
hindrance. Now is no time for grumbling and
wearing of crape. It is a-time to boost as we have
never boosted before in the history of Michigan
football. We yet have a chance to finish high in this
year's schedule, jf we will only keep our heads and
push.
Michigan has been known in the past for frequent
come-backs against apparently insurmountable odds,
and it is not inconceivable that she should finish this
season with far more for which to credit than to
blame her. Let us wait until the end of the sea-
son. Then, when it is all over and done and when
we can look back to it with some perspective
through which to form real opinions, we will have
planty of time to talk the thing over, pro and con.
Meanwhile, some Michigan special trains will be
leaving for Urbana at io o'clock tomorrow night. It
is up to every Michigan man and woman who can
spare the time and the money to raid the Corn Belt
and holler his head off if necessary - for Michigan.

MAKING IT EASIER FOR SANTA
Santa Claus is perhaps the most stirring example
of efficiency that has ever been known. Each year,
on the night before Christmas, he sets out in his jin-
gling sleigh, and before morning dawns he has en-
compassed the world, depositing his gifts in the
stockings of dreaming youngsters in every corner
of the sphere. And with it all Santa maintains his
good humor, and the last little urchin on the trip is
as faithfully cared for as is the youthful inhabitant
of the first chimney which Santa encounters.
But imagine the fatigue of Santa's reindeer as he
returns to the snowy lands after his mission of joy;
imagine the strain that they are under, stopping and
standing and starting in mid-air, not a hundred,
but millions of times in one night. Have you ever
thought of the handicap under which Santa must
carry on after the first few hours? Being an ordi-
nary human being, you have not. And neither have
we. But it is otherwise with the officials of the
state of Michigan. They have not forgotten their
childhood - perhaps they still hang out their
stockings - and they have lent their wits towards
aiding that jolly old soul named St. Nicholas in
any way which they might.
Knowing that Santa absolutely refused some
years ago to discard his reindeer sleigh for an au-
tomobile, these Michigan officials have provided a
herd of reindeer to be brought over from Norway
and kept in the Lower Peninsula so that he can at
least supply himself with a new team of steeds as
he makes the strenuous round of the world. Ten
bucks and fifty does, according to contract, will be
here to greet Santa the Christmas after next, with
a promise of more in the future.
The state officials claim that they have taken the
step in order to produce reindeer;meat in this coun-
try, - a very diplomatic thing to say, - and we
refuse to censure them for thus veiling their admir-
able philanthropy. But we are sure that Santa
Claus will not let such a praiseworthy action go un-
rewarded, and are willing to wager 'a stick of bar-
ber-pole candy that on the Christmas eves to come
he will drop an extra bon bon into the stockings
of the children of Michigan, and into the socks of
the state officials.
Said the Purdue Exponent editorially, "The Daily
Iowan set a record for college publications when
they put an extra on the streets, less than ten min-
utes after the close of the game with Illinois last
Saturday. The record will be hard to equal."
We would respectfully call the attention of the
Exponent to the fact that The Michigan Daily had
an extra at the gates of Ferry field three minues
after the Ohio State game last Saturday. The rec-
ord will be hard to equal.
Williams has awarded a varsity letter for golf.
It looks like unjust discrimination against bridge
players.
Don't fail to be on hand to see the team off for
Urbana!
The Telescope
Ode to a Boarding House Steak
You look delicious on a platter,
Large and juicy, sizzling too.
But what do all your good looks matter -
A hacksaw'd bust its teeth on you.
I whet my knife, and start to stab,
I work, and sweat, and try enough,
I thwack, and hack, and whack, and jab, -
'Tis highest praise to call you tough.
I try to chew you, but in vain,
My heart like lead, my mouth so full,
I try to dent you once, - again, -
But you're hard-boiled, Oh Sitting Bull.
Aye, let the enraptured poets sing,
Yet, yet my faith in you abides,
Who says the battleship's the thing? -

Why, you're the real Old Ironsides!
-Vee Dee.
Michigan is down-hearted! There's no doubt
about it. Just for example, since last Saturday our
contributors haven't come across with anything, not
even a snappy story for our private enjoyment. Snap
out -of it, Contribs, and don't let one football game
take all the fun out of life. Besides, we're going to
win next Saturday.
Quoth Eppie Taff:
The boy stood on the burning deck,
The flames were leaping 'round his neck,
The boy stood there too long, by heck,
And now the boy's a total wreck.
Our Latest Song Entitled:
"It's a Long Worm That Hath No Turning."
Songs of the Immortals
Joy of the house
Is Daniel Doane,
He doesn't play
The saxaphone.
Jay Bee.

1'

DETROIT UNITED LINES
Ann Arbor and Jackson
TIME TABLE
(Eactern Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars-6.o5 a.
M., 7:05 a. i., s:io a. m. and hourly to q:o
p. M.
Jackson Express Cars (local stops of Ann
Arbor), 9:48 a. m. and every two hours to
9:48 p. M.
Local Cars East Bound-5 :55 a.m., 7:oo a.
m. and every two hours to 9:oo p. m.. x':o
p. m. To Ypsilanti only-i:4o p. in., 12.25
a. M., x::5 a. m.
To Saline, change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars West Bound-7 so a. m., 2:40 p.
Mn.
To Jackson and Kalamazoo-Limited cars:
8:48, io:4& a. mn., 12:48, 2:48,-4:48.
To Jackson and Lansing-Limited: 8:48
p. m.

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1921

OCTOBER

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Phone 9SR spotless

Phone 937R

I

NOTICE TO MEN
We do all kinds of high-class Hat
work at pre-war prices. Hats turned
inside out, with all new trimmings,
are as good as new.
FACTORY HAT STORE
617--PACKARD STREET
Telephone 1792

Cleaning Pressing. Altering
Shoe Repairing and Laundry Agency
We Call For and Deliver
CORNER STATE AND JEFFERSON

9

WHITE SWAN LAUNDRY CO. Ltd.

Log Log Slide Rules

AT

GRAHAM'I $
Both ends of the diagonal baulk

U:

,11

I

I

Our Work and

Service

are

the best.

We wash in -soft

Water,

sew

on but tons,

A

darn socks, all reasonable

U_

mending

free

of charge

One Day Service on Request

I A

Phone 165

11

"When You Buy, Buy Quality"

Wool

Mufflers

Prices much loiver than last year

If it is
shouldn't

customary to call a fat man a tank, why
we say that a pugilist is a Man of War?
Ges Who.

WAGNER
For Men
STATE STRE

& COMP

Famous Closing Lines
"My life work," said the convict as he pounded
big ones into little ones. ERM.

ET

A;

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