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October 27, 1921 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-10-27

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DAY AND NIG
SEEVI!

XXXII. No. 28.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 27, 1921

PRICE F

STISFACTION is
ONLY POWER THAT
CAN AVERT STRIKE
INJUNCTIONS MAY BE SERVED ON
UNIONS BY UNITED.
STATES
QUESTIONS SUBMITTED
TO UNION PRESIDENTS
Carter Declares Settlement Should
Reimburse Men For Loss Due
to Wage Cut
(By Associated Press)
Chicago, Oct. 26.-Executives of the
Big Four brotherhood and the switch-
men's union of North America, after a
day of verbal jockeying with the Unit-
ed States railroad labor board de-
clared late toay that no power on
earth save a "satisfactory settlement"
can prevent their men from walking
out beginning at 6 o'clock next Sun-
day morning.
Submit Questions
Their declaration came at the close
of a. day of questioning when Judge R
N. Barton, chairman of the labor
board, called upon each uion presi-
dent in turn and asked him four pre-
pared questions, the third of which
was: "If the board shall declare a
strike It not justified, and should not
occur, and direct that the employees
not strike, will that order be obeyed?"
W. S. Carter declared a settlement
should also reimburse the men for
' the pay lost snce July as a result of
the wage cut.
The other three questions asked the
union leaders were: "Who, or what
authority in your labor organization
can withdraw the order to strike or
atop a strike?"
Can Strike Be Prevented
"Suppose you, the chief executive
of your organation, or your execu-
tive committee, issued an order or a
statement that a strike should not oc-
cur, do you not believe the strike
would be prevented?"
"Will you, as chief executive, use
your power and influence to see that
the order of the board on the matter
be obeyed?"
That the government contemplates
injunction proceedings against the un-
ions for violation of the transporta-
tion act was indicated by the trend of
questioning conducted by Ben W.
Hooper, representative of the public
on the board.
JUNIOR LITS PETITION
DEAN BURILEY FOR HOP
Junior lits manifested a desire to
bring back the Junior hop when they
passed a resolution at ;their class
meeting yesterday in Mason hall re-
questing Prof. Joseph A. Bursley,
Dean of Students, to consider a re-
instatement of the hop. Theodore P.
Bank, class president, with a commit-
tee consisting of J. M. Burge, J. C.
Stevens, and L. B. Torrey, will'present
the dean with a petition asking that
the dance be allowed this year.
R. E. Adams was elected student
councilman from the class. W. H.
Velde was eleced athletic managr.
The president of the class an-
nounced the appointment of the fol-
lowing committees: social-R. D.

Gibson, chairman, Paul Watzel, R. G.
Burchell, J. J. Hamels, N. W. Rob-
ertson, Ruth Southerton, Esther Wel-
ty, Mary Read; auditing - S. M.
Brown, chairman, R. V. Rice, T. E.
Dewey; athletic -- W. H. Velde, chair-
man, G. F. Perrin, B. F. Dunlop, H. j.
Liverance; finance - Charles Hum-
mer, T. L. Rice; publicity -- M. B.
Stahl.
Work of Alumni Shown In Detroit
Work of the two former Michigan
students were shown in connection
with the architectural exhibit at the
Detroit Institute of Arts last week-end.
A cathedral design by A. I. Bogg, which
was awarded a gold medal at the Pan-
American exposition at Montevideo,
'Uraguay, and a study for an architec-
tiral college by L. L. Rhod, were the

MICHIGAN ROOTERS
SAFE FROM STRIKE
Students who follow the team to
Illinois next Saturday will not be left
in Champaign with no means of re-
turn due to the threatening railroad
strike. This assurance was given yes-
terday, by C. W. Mercer, travelling
passenger agent of the Michigan Cen-
tral railroad.
The proposed nation-wide tie-u
will not take effect in all parts of the
country simultaneously, it was point-
ed out. The strike will be called into
being at different times in the vari-
ous "zones." The zone in which the
Michigan Central and Illinois Central
operate will not be left without rail-
road facilities until Nov. 5.
WOMEN WILL'BEGIN

SEE THE TEAM OFF TONIGHT

Tonight, at io o'clock, Michigan's fighting football team,
together with Coach Yost and his assistants, will leave for
Urbana, with but one thought in the minds of all, one goal
which they have all set themselves to reach, no matter what
the odds to be overcome - and that goal is victory over Illi-
nois. Last Saturday Michigan tasted bitter defeat at the
hands of Ohio State, a defeat which came unexpectedly, send-
ing a temporary wave of gloom over the campus, affecting
all loyal Michigan supporters as much as it did the men who
fought so valiantly in the face of odds and handicaps.
But instead of permitting themselves to be downhearted
and spending the week in bemoaning their fate, every man on
that team from the captain to the last reserve on the scrubs,
from Coach Yost down through his staff, has been out on
Ferry field until late every evening, working, working, work-
ing to beat the Illini next Saturday, giving unsparingly of
their time and energy that this result may be achieved.
Every Michigan man, every Michigan woman should be
behind the team, and when the train leaves, the Ann Arbor
depot 'tonight the cheers of eight thousand voices should
drown out the locomotive of the engine; cheers that will re-
sound in Urbana and warn the Illini that the Wolverine is
on the warpath, victory-bent. Everybody out at 10 o'clock
tonight and help make that team so fightin' mad that they'll
come back to Ann Arbor with Ii Indian scalps tucked se-
curely under their belts. Up and at 'em, gang, see the team
off to Urbana and victory !
UNION ANNOUNCES REGULATIONS-FOR
SPECAL RAI TO LLI~iSGAM

COUNCIL FOSTERS GNT SEND-OF
FOR TEAM TNIGHT; ADVOCATES
FRESHMEN SIRING IN WEST So

Increased

Membershi p Step
Building Like
Union

Toward

PRESIDENT BURTON IS TO
GIVE PRINCIPAL ADDRESS
President Marion L. Burton will
address the members of the Women's
league on "The Women's Building"
at the formal opening of the drive for
life membership in the University of
Michigan league at 4 o'clock tomor-
row afternoon in Hill auditorium.
The University of Michigan league
is the corporation formed of the alum-
nae and the women students which
aims to erect a building and perfect
an organization which will play the
same part in the life of the women
students as the Union plays in the
life of the Michigan men.'
Edna Groff; '22, president of the
league, will introduce the speakers:
Neva Lovell, '22, who will speak on,
"The Campaign Fund", and Susan
Fitch, '23, who will explain the basis
of membership in the league.
The following amendment to the
constitution of the Women's league
will be voted on: "A vacancy in the
board of directors of the 'Women's
league may be filled in the following
manner - the class directors of the
league board shall act as a nominat-
ing committee and present three can-
didates to the board' of direcors; the
nominee receiving a unanimous vote
shall Pe elected to fill the office."
Following the meeting there will be
a reception in Barbour gymnasium.
FRESHMEN L E A R N
CAMPUS WORKINGS
Speakers at the meeting of upper-
class advisers and the. charges last
night at the Union gave advice con-
cerning the attitude which every first
year man shouldaassume toward his
academic work and concerning the
campus activities which he may elect.
John Lawton, '24, as chairman of the
mieeting, introduced Prof. W. R. Hum-
phreys, assistant dean of students, who
spoke against the use of "short cuts"
to success, especially in University
life. "You are now in an atmosphere
of complete freedom and no longer un-
der the watchfill eye of high school
teachers and home influence," said
Professor Humphreys. "It devolves
upon you to adjust yourself to cir-
cumstances which have hitherto been
unknown to you."
Emerson Swart, '22E, president of
the Union, explained the origin, growth
and purposes of that institution, and
Walter B. Rea, '22, captainsof the Var-
sity basketball team, stressed the im-
portance of every frpshman turning
out for some branch'of athletics. By-
ron Field, of the rhetoric department,
the third speaker, explained student
publications and their possibility as
an alternative activity to the student
not athletically inclined. Field placed
The Daily as first and foremost among
student publications and asserted that
it is without doubt unsurpassed by any
other college daily in the country.
The meeting was entertained with
saxaphone and piano music by Karl
S. Schoen, '22, and Edward McCallum,
'24D.
Dr. Carl Huber in Phildelphia
W Dr. Carl Huber, of the Medical
school, is in Philadelphia this week
attending a meeting of the American
congress of surgeons.

Students

May Exchange Coupon Re-
ceipts for Tickets
Today

LAST TRAIN FROM CHICAGO
LEAVES CITY AT 11 O'CLOCK
Final regulations for the special
train that will carry students over the
Michigan Central railroad to the Il-
linois football game next Saturday
were issued yesterday by Union offi-
cials in charge of the plans.
Exchange Coupons Today
An opportunity for both men and
women students to exchange coupon
receipts for railroad -tickets will be
given from 2 to 8 o'clock today, when
a representative of the Michigan Cen-
tral will be at the desk in the Union
lobby to give out tickets and receive
reservations for Pullman accommo-
dations on both trips. Those who can-
not reach the Union before 8 o'clock
tonight will be able to purchase tick-
ets at the 'Michigan Central station
Friday, but, as it is essential to pre-
pare sufficient equipment to handle the
hundreds of students that will make
the trip, everyone is asked to notify
the management before 8 o'clock to-
night, when the office in the Union
will be closed.
It is absolutely necesasry, accord-
ing to railroad officials, to leave Ann
Arbor on the special train at 10
o'clock Friday night in order to make
use of the $12.14 round trip rate that
has been secured from the railroad
company. The special will reach Ur-
bana at 7 o'clock Saturday morning
and hold over until 10 o'clock Satur-
day night, when it will start on the
return trip.
May Stp Over in Chicago t
Students who wish to stay . over
Sunday in Chicago can leave the spe-
cial at 1 o'clock Sunday morning,
when it passes through the city, or'
can avail themselves of the special
rate on the Illinois Central by leav-t
ing Urbana on the regular 6:30 o'clock
train. The special, leaving at 101
o'clock Saturday night, is the last
train from Urbana on which the spe-
cial tickets will be honored. The last
train that can be taken out of Chi-
cago on rthe Michigan Central leaves
at 10 o'clock railroad time or 11
o'clock city time Sunday night, ar-
riving in Ann Arbor at 6:30 o'clock,
city time, on Monday morning.
The Pullman rates that were an-
nounced in yesterday's Daily have.
been raised by the railroad office. Low--
er berths at the present rate will cost
$4.46, upper berths $3.56, and draw-
ing, rooms $16.20, with the option al-
lowed to studetns of doubling up on
accommodations. It is essential, Union
officials say, to make reservations for.
Pullmans on the return trip, as the
be notified of the number of Pullman
cars that will be needed for the re-
turning section.
WIN FROM ILLINOIS!
BUY A "SPECIAL" TICKET NOWl

WOMEN, BUY URBANA
TICKETS FROM DEAN
All women who intend to go to.
Illinois game leaving on the
special train -must buy their
ticket applications today at Dean
Myra B. Jordan's offie. These
applieations will then be ex-
changed for railroad tickets from
2 to 8 o'clock this afternoon in
.the main lobby of the Union.
Pullman reservations may be
tmade at that time.
Tickets sold. at the . special
rate are good only on the spec.
ial train leaving Ann Arbor, but
the return trip may be made on
other trains.
Provision for the entertain.
meat of women Saturday evening
is being made by the Illinois
Women's league. Dean Jordan
has requested that all women
who intend to stop over in Chi-
cago see her. , Cheeks will not
be accepted in payment for the
ticket applications at her office.
'ENSIAN STAFF WANTS
SENIOR PHOTOS TAEN
Seniors' pictures are wanted for the
Michiganensian. The present trou-
ble, according to members of the 'En-
sian staff, is that only a few of the
seniors are sitting for their photo-
graphs. There are yet more than 900
sittings to be made and it is impera-
tive that these be attended to at once
in order that there may be time for
everyone.
The period set for these pictures
was Oct. 18 to Nov. 18. Half the time
is gone and less than one-fourth of
the work is completed. Sittings may
be arranged by telephone at any of
the authorized photographers.

TURN YOUR CLOCK BACK
I HOUR SATURDAY NIGHT
Those who are afflcted with a
desire to sleep long and late, ex-
pecially on these cold mornings,
will be graced with an extra hour
of sleep next Sunday morning.
2 o'clock in the morning, all city
and campus clocks will be turn.
ed back one hour to Central
Standard time.'
I '
IHS YOST SEEN HIS DA?"
STUDENT BRANDS STATEMENTS
OF TUBBS AS RIDICULOUS AND
UNFOUNDEDj
Editor, The Michigan Daily:
The stateemnts of Mr. Tubbs con-
cerning Coach Yost in a communica-
tion to The Daily are so absurdly di-+
diculous and .unfounded upon fact
that they should not be given even
passing consideration, except that
they unjustly criticize the Michigan
coach at a time when the backing of+
every Michigan man should be given
him and the team in an effort to win
the remaining games. For this rea-
son and the fact that such fallacious'
charges may influence numerous oth-
er ephemeral thinkers who are grand-
stand students of football, I am an-
swering his absurdities-.
Questions Reason for Charges
For the sake of argument, let us
admit that every one of Mr. Tubb's
accusations are true - which is not
so. Would that be any reason for,
making charges against Coach Yost's-1
abiity at this time? Does he think
that his untimely remarks will bring
a change in coaches at this point of
the season. If so, he is sadly misled.
For the presetn season Coach Yost-
will direct the Michigan football.
team. The team must have confidencea
in their coach; they have it now, but
if from all sides this insidious propa-
ganda against the coach is allowed to
creep in, the men cannot have the
unity of front and the confidence
against coming teams that they
should. What is needed now is some
real enthusiasm and strong hearty
backing of the team and coach.
Mr. Tubbs' Ignorance
Now for Mr. Tubbs' exhibition of
utter ignorance concerning what real-
ly happened at the football game. His
criticism of Frank Steketee is un-
warranted. If Mr. Tubbs realized that
Steketee is one of the greatest play-
ers of the day and up to the Ohio
game had played as wonderful football
as any man in this country, he might
excuse one "off day". But even so, did
Stpketee play as poorly as is charg-
ed? It is admitted that he made two
poor punts, but counting out these,
he averaged for the rest of the game
at least 35 yards, which is better kick-
ing than is seen on 75 per cent of
modern football teams. The trouble
with this charge is that Mr. Tubbs,
and others, fal to realize that Stek-
etee was giving his best, which was
j below the best that he has done be-
fore. His critics can't see that they
expected too much.
Coach Yost was not responsible for
Stuart's returning the punt for a
\touchdown. The team is coached to
start immediately for a kick, and they
had gone a number of yards beyond
the ball, before it was evident that
the punt was short and to the side.

They immediately started back, but -it
was too late. It was one of those
"breaks of the game". Nothing more
or less. In the Chicago Tribune Wal-,
ter Eckersall says, "While the Wol-
verines' defeat by the Buckeyes was
bitter to the thousands of alumni who
attended the game, the Michigan play-
ers dtd not play the brand of foot-
ball taught by the veteran mentor.
Stuart's touchdown after picking up
Steketee's punt should never have
happened. Errors of this kind cannot
be blamed on the coach."
(Continued on Page Four)

BAND TO LEAD STUDENT
FROM HILL AUDITORIU1.
AT 8:15
PLAYERS LEAVE FRODI
ANN ARBOR STAT
Student Body Also Goes on Re"c
Favoring Reinstatement o
Junior Hp
Arrangements were made f
giant send off for the team wi
leaves tonight for Illinois, at a
ing of the Student council hl
night at the Union. The players
at 10 o'clock from the Ann
railroad station. The council
made provision for the location
Block "M", which will be compo
freshmen, in the West stand a
future football games.
Band Forms at :15 O'clocl
Tonight the band will be in
of Hill auditorium at 8:15 o'clc
lead the student body in sendi
team to Urbana. This send-of
give the students a splendid (
tunity to display their come
spirit and a huge crowd is ex
to be .out. At the station chee
ers will be present to lead the
gan cheers and songs and OC
Dunne of the football team will
The committee in charge of the
onstrations, consisting of E
Harbeck, '22, and G. W. McC
'22E, 'strongly urge that all
dents be out tonight as much <
success of the team at 111ino
pends on the showing made a
time. Owing to the fact thsat
football men must be in bed a
o'clock the crowd will disperse e
time.
Hereafter all freshmen will be
ed in a body in Athe West
where they will compose the
"M" and form a solid cheerIn
tion.
Freshmen Honored
This honor has been awarde
freshman class in order that i
have an opportunity of getting
together and helping the Univ
In this way a whole section w
set aside as a cheering sectio
thus better co-operation wi
brought about between the
leaders and the men in the s
New cheers may be tried out t
ter advantage in this way als<
Student council expects to mali
custom traditional and no fre
will be allowed to sit in any
place than in the West stand a
football game in the future.
The council, in considering
matters- of student interest, alsc
on record as favorig the reistat
of the "J" Hop.
Moore Headline
Fourth Reci
Earl V Moore will give the
concert in the Twilight Organ
at 4:15 this afternoon in Hill
torium. He will give the usi
miutes of music and it is req
in order to keep the atmosphi
these recitals as planned, that
in their seats promptly.
His program will be:
Breton Rhapsody .......Saint
Largo, "New World" Sympho
. ....... .... .... .,. .. D
Scherzo ........... .....
Campus Chimes (request).
Toccta ...................ra
'25 ENGINEERS HEAR BRUMI
SPEAK ON "MERE EFFICII

Prof. John L. Brumm, of the r1
and journalism dpartment, add
the freshman engineers' assembl
terday morning upon, "The Mer
Mere Efficiency." Professor I
urged the freshmen to remembe
ing their college courses that
were training to become citizf
well as technical men, and that I
desire for technical training
should not lose sight of the b
educational facilities of the I
sity.
WIN FRO A ILLINOIS .
BUY A "SPECIAL" TICKET

Bulletin

Princeton, Oct. 26.--The intercolleg-
iate conference on the limitation of'
armament opened its session this aft-
ernoon with representatives present
from more than 40 colleges and uni-
versities. T. C. McEachin, Jr., chair-
man of the senior council committee
of Princeton, presided. It is expected
a continuing committee will be ap-
pointed which will in turn name a sub-
committee to draw up resolutions ex-
pressing the .sentiments of the con-
ference.
Pres. John Greer Hibben, of Prince-
ton university, in a statement before
the meeting began, said there had been
a surprising unanimity of sentiment
among colleges and universities in
favor of the object of the coming
Washington conference.

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