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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 20, 1921 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-10-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY
OF MICHIGAN
Pu ished every morning except Monday during the Univer-
sity year by the Board in Control of Student Publications.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use for
republication of all news dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
credited in this paper and the local news published therein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
class matter.
Suscription by carrier or mail, $3.50.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press building, Maynard Street.
Phones: Business, 960; Editorial, 24=4.
Communications not to exceed 300 words, if signed, the sig-
nature not necessarily to appear in print, but as an evidence of
faith, and notices of events will be published in The Daily at the
discretion of the Editor, if 'left at or mailed to The Daily office.
Unsigned communications will receive no consideration. No man-
uscript will be returned unless the writer incloses postage.
The Daily does not necessarily endorse the sentiments ex-
pressed in the communications.
"What's Going On" notices will not be received after 6 o'clock
on the evening preceding insertion.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
MANAGING EDITOR...........BREWSTER P. CAMPBELL
Assistant Managing Editor................Hugh W. Hitchcock
City Editor ...... .......--- .....E. P. Lovejoy, Jr.
Night Editors-
M. B. Stahl G. P. Overton
R. E. Adams Iughston McBain
Paul Watzel Edward Lambrecht
F. H. McPike
Editorials..T. J. Whinery, L. A. Kern, S. T. Beach, E. R. Meiss
Supplement Editors ....... ......T. S. Sargent, T. H. Adams
Sporting Editor ................................George Reindel
Women's Editor...........................Elizabeth Vickery
Humor Editor ............................. .... E R. Meiss
Assistants
Harry B. Grundy John Dawson Ben H. Lee, Jr.
Wallace F. Elliott Sidney B. Coates Julian Mack
M. A. Klaver Lowell S. Kerr Howard Donahue
Dorothy Whipple H. E. Howlett Arxrold Fleig
Marion Koch Katherine Montgomery
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
BUSINESS MANAGER ............. VERNON F. HILLERY
Advertising..........................F. M. Heath, A. J. Parker
Publication ............................."Nathan W. Robertson
Accounts................................ John J. Hamels, Jr.
Circulation.....................-..-........Herold C. Hunt
Assistants.
Burr L. Robbins Richard Cutting H. Willis Heidbreder
W. Cooley James Prentiss W. Kenneth Galbraith
L. Beaumont Parks Maurice Moule J. A. Dryer
Walter Scherer Martin Goldring Richard Heidemann
Edw. Murane Tyler Stevens T. H. Wolfe

a day passes but what the dean of the Medical
school receives one or more letters from towns
without doctors. In an effort to find a possible so-
lution of this problem Dr. Cabot was asked for his
views upon the subject.
"Yes," he said, "it is true that the mortality is
now greater in the country than in the cities. The
average age of doctors in rural districts in the
middle west is over 55! This is so because the
young graduate is not going to the country to prac-
tice because he cannot do it and keep his self-re-
spect.
"Fifty years ago, or even twenty-five years ago,
when I started the practice of medicine, a young
man could go out with a few tools and an assort-
ment of pills and make a fairly successful prac-
titioner.
"But now all that is changed.
"The young doctor is taught now that he must
not guess. Before he can tell a patient he has ty-
phoid, he must first test the blood or demonstrate
the typhoid bacilli. He must have positive proof
that the patient suffers from typhoid fever before
he diagnosises it as such. In order to do this he is
taught the use of the most modern methods and the
latest scientific discoveries. Consequently, he must
have a work-shop, or laboratory, in which to carry
out his investigations.
"When a young doctor goes to the country he has
no means of access to such a laboratory. It is ob-
vious that a young graduate cannot fit up a labora-
tory for which he must buy X-ray machines, chemi-
cals, and apparatus running into the thousands of
dollars, besides paying a staff of assistants to run
it. Yet without such a laboratory he cannot prac-
tice the brand of modern medicine which he has.
been taught.
"So the only solution would seem to be in what
(for lack of a better term), we may call a com-
munity work-shop or laboratory, where a doctor
may have the materials and instruments to properly
work out the diagnosis and treatment of his pa-
tient's symptoms.
"Suppose a young doctor sets a leg. He cannot
take the patient to a large town for an X-ray, so
must do the best he can, working blindly. If the
patient is not satisfied with the result he can sue
the young doctor and recover. Why? Because
the doctor did not use an X-ray !
"In Iowa, where the community hospital idea
has been developing for some twenty year it has
proved very successful, and if our rural population
is not to be left without medical attention, the plan
must be extended."
The problem of medical attention for our rural
districts is a serious one, then. It is not that the
young doctor does not like the country, for many of
them do. It is because of the rapid strides of mod-
ern medicine, which the young doctor is taught, he
dare not (nor can he, without losing his self-re-
spect) practice his profession in the rural districts
where lie must fall back upon the hit or miss
methods used by his grandfather.
And whether we like it or not, we must face the
fact that the only real solution of the problem is
the building of community hospitals or laboratories
where the rural doctor may have the materials and
instruments to properly work out the diagnosis and
treatment of his patient's symptoms.
TIhe Teleope
Cowpuncher Punched No More
Upon his colt, with disconcern,
Sat mean Cowpuncher Joe;
"And now',, quoth he, "just watch and see
How this young horse can go."
Then did he thrust a spurred heel
Into the beastie's side,
The other foot caught in his mane
And that began the ride.
The bronc did pitch both high and wild,
Which leaves not much to tell;
Except the fact the cinch did bust
And Joe woke up in Hell.
-Okaniogan Red.

THE MATINEE MUSICALE CLUB
presents
CHARLES WAKEFIELD CADMAN,
Piano
PRINCESS TSIANINA,
Mezzo-Soprano
ALL-AMERICAN CONCERT PROGRAM
Thursday, Oct. 20, 8:30 P. M.
At Michigan Union
Single Admission - $1.00
Tickets on Sale at Graham's and Wahr's
Bookstores. The Matinee Musicale Club
is indebted to Mr. Graham for the use of
this space.

DETROIT UNITED LINES
Ann Arbor and Jackson
TIME TABLE
(Eastern Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars-6.o a.
M., 7:05 a. in., 8:10 a. m. and hourly to 9:10
P. Mn.
Jackson Express Cars (local stops of Ann
Arbor), 9:48 a. m. and every two hours to
9:48 P. in.
Local Cars East Bound-5:55 a.m., 7:0o a.
m. and every two hours to 9 :00 p. i.. :oo
p. im. To Ypsilanti only-i1:40 P. In., 12.25
a. m., 1i a. n.
To Saline, change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars West Bound-7:5o a. m., 2:40 p.
M.
To Jackson and Kalamazoo-Limited cars:
8:48, to:48 a. tn., 12:48, 2:48, 4:48.
To Jackson and Lansing-Limited: 8:48
p. m.

Dr. George E. Mickle
OSTEOPATHIC PHYSICIAN
Office honrs daily by appoint-
nient Telephone 256
Rm. 12, Over Arcade Theatre
711 N. University Ave.
- 111111111111111111111111 cliii 11111111111111111

SLEEP ANYWHERE, BUT
EAT AT REX'S
THE CLUB LUNCH
712 Arbor Street
Near State and Packard Streets

4

Thnename speaks for it's self
WUERTH .ARCADE

1921

OCTOBER

2
9
16
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30

3
10
17
24
31

4
11
18
25

5
12
19
26

6
13
20
27

7
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1921
8
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NOTICE TO MEN
We do all kinds of high-class Hal
work at pre-war prices. Hats turned
Inside o011, with all new trimmiings,
are as good as new.
FACTORY HAT STORE
611 AehKARDp l STET
Teleplione 1792

_

If
if
if

you
or
you
or

are hungry,
are thirsty,

.I

I

Persons wishing to secure information concerning news for
Any issue of The Daily should see the night editor, who has full
charge of all news to be printed that night.
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20, 1921
Night Editor-HUGHSTON McBAIN
THE PRESS CLUB CONVENTION
Michigan is prepared to welcome today newspa-
per men representing eight different organizations
coming from every corner of the state, besides a
few outsiders who are of national reputation and
importance. Student committees have been work-
ing overtime in order to secure adequate rooming
accommodations for the visitors, and everything is
in readiness to start the University Press club con
vention off with a bang. The impending sessions
will be of mutual benefit to the state newspaper
men as well as to the many students interested in
journalism and enrolled in that department.
In the past the newspaper men of Michigan have
not been very well informed as to the type of in-
struction in journalism administered by the Uni-
versity. Nearly all of them have been deeply ab-
sorbed in their work, and, perhaps, many of them
prejudiced as to the practicality of attempting to
turn out newspaper men through the medium of the
class room. But as it is realized by those teaching
journalism at the University that the way to round
out the instruction is to secure the co-operation of
the editors throughout the state an attempt will be
made at the present convention to interest the visit-
ing delegates in the work carried on, and to demon-
strate the exact nature of the instruction. By se-
curing their understanding and support a better
feeling will result which will lead to increased effi-
ciency in the department of journalism.
Through the convention the student of journal-
ism may profit by hearing discussions and speeches
by practical newspaper men. In the classroom he is
given an over-dose of theory. Consequently, it
is to his advantage to supplement his theoretical
knowledge by coming into contact with men who
are familiar with the intense business-like atmos-
phere which must be predominant in a newspaper
office.
Another important side of the convention is the
opportunity offered for the state journalists to meet
on common ground and to share each other's view-
points. Country editors as well as men on the met-
ropolitan dailies will be assembled together, and it
is likely that profitable discussions will result.
Indications are that the convention this year will
be bigger and better than ever before. The program
is more varied and extensive and is graced with the
name of at least one or two practicing journalists
known the country over. Its complete success,
which now seems certain, carries with it many-
fold benefits to students, to newspaper men of the
state, and to Michigan's school of journalism.
NEEDED - COMMUNITY HOSPITAL
What has become of the old-fashioned country
doctor? The middle aged man who used to be f am-
ilytconfidant, helper, counselor, and best friend
What has become of that great army of self-sacri-
ficing medical men of the old school who thought
nothing of driving twenty miles through a winter
blizzard to ease the sufferings of some poor farm-
. *r's wife late at night?
In the fall of 19I9 in the state of Massachusetts
alone there were sixty-eight towns without medi-
cal attention of any kind. The Kentucky Medical
society recently memorialized the American lMedi-
cal association with an account of the shortage of
doctors in the rural districts of that state. Hardly

STONE SETTING
SETS
Replaced in
RINGS AND PINS
ALL SIZES AND KINDS OF
STONES AND PEARLS
Real and Imitation
HALLER & FULLER
STATE ST. JEWELERS

Drop in at that friendly place.
TUTTLE'S LUNCH ROOM

you just need a friend,-

r

I

I

U 81_

I

ANN ARBOR
CHOP SUE
314 S. State St.

Y

Place Newly Decorated
QUICK SERVICE
PRICES REASONABLE
EVERYTHING GOOD

!'

ADRIAN-ANN ARBOR BUS
SCHEDULE EFFECTIVE OCT. 10, 192!
Central Standard Time

2 1

a o2
Read Dow"n

A.M.. P.M. P.M. A&PM
Daliy Daily Daily Daily
7:30 1:30 Lv... Adrian .Ar. 7:00 12.45
8:o5 2:05 ...'Tecumseh ... 6:25 12:10
8:25 2:25 ..... Clinton...... 6:05 11 :50
9:15 3:1s Saline ...... 5:15 11:oo
9:45 3 :45 Ar. Ann Arbor Lv. 4:45 10.30
A.M. . P.M. P.M. A&PM
Read UP
SUNIAYS AND HOLIDAYS
P.M P.M.
3:30 Lv Adrian ..Ar :o0
4:05 ...Tecumnseh .... 82
4:25 ...Clinton ... 8:05
5:5 ...Saline .... 7:15
5:45 Ar. Ann Arbor Lv. 6:45
P.M. P.M.
AT THE CORNER OF
STATE & PACKARD
STREETS
Blue Front
Cigar Store
WE HAVE EVERY-
THING YOU'LL
NEED AFTER
THE GAME.

November Records NOW ON SALE
COLUMBIA
A-3453-SALLY, WON'T YOU COME BACK? Intro. "Bring Back My
Blushing Rose," from "Ziegfeld Follies of 1921." Medley
Fox Trot-Incidental Singing by Mr. Lewis.
Ted Lewis and His Orchestra
SECOND HAND ROSE. Intro. "I Know," from "Ziegfeld
Follies of 1921." Medley Fox Trot.
Ted Lewis and His Orchestra
A-3467-SWEET LADY, from "Tangerine." Intro. "Vamping Rose."
(Crumit and Zoob.)-(Violinsky and Schuster.) Medley
Fox Trot. Columbia Dance Orchestra
SOUTH SEA ISLES. Intro. "She's Just a Baby," from "Geo.
White's Scandals of 1921." Medley Fox Trot.,
The Happy Six
A-3459-I AIN'T NOBODY'S DARLING. (King.) Song Fox Trot.
Paul iBese Trio and Frank Crumit
FRANKIE AND JOHNNY. (Leighton Bros.) Song Fox Trot,
Paul iBese Trio and Frank Crumit
A-8458-MOLLY 0.~ (Hickman and Black.) Fox Trot.
Art Hickman's Orchestra
GOODBYE PRETTY BUTTERFLIES. (Cooke and Olman.)
Fox Trot. Art Hickman's Orchestra
A-8457-I'M LOOKING FOR A BLUEBIRD (TO CHASE MY BLUES
AWAY). (Rich.) Comedienne.
Paul Biese's Orchestra. Ace. Marion Harris
SWEET COOKIE. (Le Clere.) Comedienne.
Paul Biese's Orchestra. Ace. Marion Harris
A-3461-IN THE OLD TOWN HALL, from "Ziegfeld Follies."
(Pease, Nelson and Johnson.) Comedians. Orchestra Ace.
Van and Schenck
WHAT'S-A GONNA BE NEXT, from "Ziegfeld Follies."
(Yellen, Van and Schenck.) Comedians. Orchestra Ace.
Van and Schenck
A-3465-TUCK ME TO SLEEP IN MY OLD KENTUCKY HOME.
(Meyer.) Tenor #nd Baritone Duet. Orchestra Ace.
Edwin Dale and George Reardon
MY SUNNY TENNESSEE. (Kalmar, Harry Ruby and Her-
man Ruby.) Male Quartette. Orchestra Ace.
Broadway Quartette
A-3463-WHO'LL BE THE NEXT ONE (TO CRY OVER YOUI)
(Black.) Tenor Solo. Orchestra Acc. Charles Harrison
IF YOU ONLY KNEW. (Von Tilzer.) Tenor Solo. Orchestra
Ace. Edwin Dale
A-3460-SLEEPY HEAD. (Brown and Hill.) Tenor and Baritone
Duet. Orchestra Ace. Edwin Dale and George Reardon
FARE THEE WELL, LOVE, FARE THE WELL. (Keith.)
Male Quartette. Orch. Acc. Columbia Stellar Quartette
A-3450-I AIN'T GIVIN' NOTHIN' AWAY. (Zoeller.) Male Quartette.
Southern Negro Quartette
SWEET MAMMA (PAPA'S GETTING MAD.) (Little, Frost
and Rose.) Male Quartette. Southern Negro Quartette
A-3464---WANG WANG BLUES. (Mueller, Johnson and Busse.) Fox
Trot. Ted Lewis and His Band
HOME AGAIN BLUES. (Berlin and Akst.) Fox Trot.
Ted Lewis and His Band
A-3468-IN A BOAT. Intro. "Peaches." (Lange, Liggy and Klap-
holz-Conrad.) Medley Fox Trot. The Happy -Sx
EMALINE. Intro. "Remember the Rose." (McHugh.)-- (Si-
mons.) Medley Fox Trot. Yerkes Jazarimba Orchestra
A-3451-I'LL KEEP ON LOVING YOU. (Rose.) Accordion Solo.
Guido Deiro
CROONING. (Caesar.) Accordion Solo. Guido Deiro
ALLMENDINGER MUSIC SHOP
122 EAST LIBERTY STREET

Stories We Don't Believe:
The laziest man in the world: he gets up at 5
o'clock in the morning so he'll have more time to2
loaf.

Quoth Eppie Taff:
Here lie the bones
Of Rolland Becker,
He rolled off the top
Of his double-decker.
-Erma
. . A Good Reason
Ethel-Didn't Mabel have anyone to take he
the dance? 1
Gladys-Why, she had Jack.
Gertie-Yes, but he didn't.
-Cicer
Spontaneous Disappearance
Mary had a little goat
He drank some kerosene,
And then he ate a sulfur match -
Since then he's not benzine.
-Teddy Bear.
Famous Closing Lines
"Watered stock," muttered the farm-hand
he led the cattle away from the pump.

a.
L.
x to
o.

-

we

alamaanal

When You buy, 3uy Quality"
Those
.-rough Irish Plaid backs are here

WAGNER
For Men

& COMPANY
Since 1848

as

STATE

STREET

AT

LIBERTY

ERM.

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