100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 20, 1921 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-10-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE WEATHER
CLOUDY AND COOLER
.TODAY

Y

5k igan

Iatl

ASSOCIATEI
PRESS
DAY ANANIGHT M
SERTICE

i'

I

vi

'I

VOL. XXXIL No. 22. ANN ARBOR MICHIGAN. THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20, 1921 PRICE FIVE C

OFFICIAL

ENRO LLMENT

IS

11,22

STRIKE HANGS IN
MEETINGS DECIDE

TWO GREAT CONFERENCES
UNIONS CONVENE IN
CHIC4Go

OF

LAWs, DENTS, AND
PHARMICS ELECT
All the law classes and the fresh-
man dents elected their officers yes-
terday. 0. J. Watts was elected presi-
dent of the senior law class, with
L. A. Parker vice-president, Edward C.
P. Davis secretary, and C. A. Spiess
treasurer. Junior laws elected the
following: President, C. C. Watson;
vice-president, C. Y. Morris; secre-
tary, H. E. Hayes; treasurer, F. F.
Wynn. Freshman laws selected:
President, Francisco enberthy; vice-
president, Gladys Wells; secretary,
Oscar Brown; and treasurer, S. R.
Bidwell.
The freshman dents elected W. C.
Cartier president, H. 0. Shwarz
vice-president, H. M. Vielmetti secre-
tary, and 0. M. Graves treasurer.

PRES*MEN OPEN
ANNUAL ME[ETING
TODAYAT UNION
PRESENCE OF ARTHUR.BRISBANE,
FAMOUS EDITORIAL WRITER,
PROMISED
PLAN VARIED PROGRAM
FOR NEWS DELEGATES
Dean Effinger, Coach Yost, Robert
Frost Are Among Speakers at
Informal Dinner

RAILROAD HEADS SEE
POSSIBLE SETTLEMENT
Shop Crafts and Maintenance of Ways
Men Opposing Walk-out is
Claim
(By Associated Press)
Chicago, Oct. 19.-Preparation for
the various moves through. which it
is hoped the second rail strike will be
averted was completed today, and to-
morrow the peace effort will be in full
swing. Tonight heads of the Unions
and of the carriers were silently alert
with-figuratively speaking-one eye
on the conference tomorrow between
the "big five" rail union leaders and
the railroad labor board, and the oth-
er on meetings of officials of eleven
anions which have not yet joined the
conductors, engineers, firemen and
switchmen. Both sides were agreed
that out of these conferences would
come the final decision as to whether
g general walkout of rail employees
Would materialize,
On the conference with the labor
board rested the possibility of the "big
Ave" being persuaded to cancel their
orders for a walkout, while in the
meeting of the eleven unions, which
actually started today, wam to be de-
cided whether these organizations
holding the balance of manpower
through numbering three-fourths of
the nearly two million rail workers in
their membership, would join the "big
five" if they walk~ed out Oct. 30 as

planned.
While this
upon as the
peace moves,
professed to
settlement of

conference was looked
most important of the
railroad officials tonight
see signs of a peaceful
the difficulties in the at-

titude of B. M. Jewell, head of the 476,-
000 members of the six railway shop
crafts organization, and of J. C.
Smock, vice-president of the main-
tenace of ways union, which numbers
300,000 men,
F1EW SENIORS REPORT FOR
MICHIGANENSIAN SITTINGS
Lees than 200 seniors have had their
Michiganensian portraits taken to
date, according to figures received
this week from the Spedding, Rent-
schler, Randall, and Dey studios. This
leaves more than thousand to obtain
sittings within the next month, ac-
cording to a Michiganensian staff
member, and seniors should bear in
mind that Nov. 18 is the last date
upon which photographs for publica-
tion in the senior section will be ac-
cepted.
7rakies And Sect io
'ederal .estrai
(By Delbert Clark)
"There ain't agpin' to be no Strike."
At least, so say the men most directly
pgfected, the union members themsel-
ye. "Of ourse, the thing is right
where we want it, and we're agoin' to
hold out, but the government ain't
agoiU' to let it come. They'll settle
It before it starts." This from the
section hand, with his red and white
A. F. L. badge.
The attitude of the union men is
one of confidence as to the outcome.
"If the roads had cut their rates like
they promised the last time they cut
our wages no one would think of
striking. But they didn't do it. The
only way to settle the thing once for
all, is to make them reduce their
freight and passenger rates, so that
business can pick up. Then prices
will be lower, and we can live on our
wages. We'll get what we want.
They'll have to give it to us."
The engineer looked down from his
lofty perch and said, 'Of course we'll
carry the mails and the xmilk. Thero'l

The senior pharmics elected the All arrangements for the opening
following: President, H. F. Von Ew- sessions of the annual meeting of the
egen; vice-president, G. C. Tasker; University Press club of Michigan to-
secretary, Monice Allen; treasurer, day are completed and an exceeding-
Francis Lutes. The junior officers ly interesting program arranged. Ad-
are: President, T. C. Daniels; vice- vance acceptances by editors all over
.president, J. G. Searle; secretary, the state of invitations to attend would
Helen Anderson; treasurer, H. A. indicate that the attendance will be
Whitney. la ger than for any previous meeting.
Mr. E. J. Ottaway, of the Port Hu-
on Times-Herald, and president of
the University Press club, arrived in
the city last evening. Positive assur-
ance has been received that Mr. Ar-
thur Brisbane, the most noted and
highest paid editorial writer in the
country, will attend the Friday eve-
ning session.
Proclaimed "Master Pianist" of In. Delegates Register at Union
tenational Reputation The delegates arrive here this
by Critics morning and will be met at the sta-
tion by a reception committee from
the Students Press club. They will be
PROGRAM INCLUDES CHOPIN, ' escorted to the Michigan Union, where
BEETHOVEN, BACH SELECTIONS they will register and be assigned to
rooms which have been listed for
Harold Bauer will give the first their use.
concert in the Choral Union series at After luncheon each section will be
8 o'clock tonight in Hill auditorium, given an opportunity to discuss its
He is a pianist of international repu- own affairs until 3:30 o'clock, at which
He s apiaistof ntenatona reu-time the first general session of the'
tation, in fact he is called the "mas- University Press club will be heldtat
ter pianist", a term unanimously the Union. The address of welcome
conceded him by critics throughout will be delivered by President E. J.
the country. Ann Arbor patrons have Ottaway. Mr. Lee A White, editorial
always been enthusiastic when he secretary of the Detroit News, will
has played here in past years and speak on "Training for Journalism".
ticket sales this year show more than An address on the subject, "What the
usual interest. University 'Attempts to Teach the
His complete program is as fol- Prospective Journalist", will be de-
lows: livered by Prof. F. N. Scott, of the
Partita in B fat..............Bach rhetoric department. A general dis-
Prelude, Allemande, Sarabande cussion will follow in which the
Minuet, Gigue question, "Is the Educational Pro-
(Arranged from the harpsichord by gram Adequate?", will be taken up
Harold Bauer) under the leadership of the following
Sonata Appassionate ......Beethoven newspaper men: Stuart H. Perry of
Alegro assal, Andante con varia- Adrian, president of the Michigan
zione, Finale allegro Dailies' association (dailies of the
(a) Scenes from Childhood.....' larger cities); Frank R. Moses, of
...... . ................Schumann Marshall, president of the Michigan
From Foreign Lands, Funny Story. League of Home Dailies; J. E. Ballard,
Catch Me If You Can, Childish En- president of the Michigan Press as-
treaty, Perfectly Satisfied, Great sociation; Miss Emma E. Bower,
Event, Dreaming (Traumerei), At nresident of the Woman's Press asso-
the Fireside, The Rocking Horse, ciation of Michigan; Harry M. Nimmo,
Almost Too Serious, Frightening! Detroit, for the metropolitan week-
Falling Asleep, The Poet Speaks, lies; Roy Marshall of Detroit, editor
(b) Ballade in A flat........Chopin of "Concrete", for the business and
(a) Etude In D flat ........... Liszt technical publications of the state.
(b) Fountains .................Ravel Dinner at Union
(c.) Waltz etude ........Saint-Saens At 6 o'clock an informal dinnef'
.~......will be served at the Union. Follow-
)n H ands eclare Ing this there will be informal talks
by Robert Frost, the poet,_ Coach
rt certain In Strike Yost, Dean J. R. Effinger, of the lit-
erary college, Prof. C. H. VanTyne, of
the history department, and Prof.
probably be a car for mail and one for Evans Holbrook, of the Law school.
milk, and then another one for the All delegates will be guests of the
trainmen, but there won't be any pas- University Musical society at the
sengers carrl.ed. But we won't have Choral Union concert by Harold
to come to that. They'll settle it be- Bauer, pianist, at 8 o'clock in Hill
fore the 30th." auditorium. Reservations of seats
The brakeman, hardly looking up have been made and an invitation ex-
from his work, remarked: "There's tended to the delegates to attend.
been a lot of misleading figures print- After the concert an informal smok-
ed to hurt our case. They publish a er and entertainment will be held at
story about an engineer what made the Union.
$240 in two weeks. But they didn't
say that he worked 16 hours a day to SAN FRANCISCO MINT MAKING
earn it. He did a month's work in two 260,000 SILVER DOLLARS DAILY
weeks."
Every railroad man will cite you the (By Associated Press)
example of Henry Ford's management San Francisco, Oct. 19.-Approxi-
of his new line. In the picturesque mately 260,000ssilver dollars are be-
diction of one of them: "Ford took a ing made daily at the San Francisco

SPARGO POSTPONES
'LOCAL ENGAGEMENT
John Spargo, called the "sane so-
cialist", has been called to Washing-
ton on important business and will
be unable to fulfill his lecture en-
gagement at Ann Arbor on Oct. 28,
according to a telegram received by
Prof. Thomas E. Trueblood, of the
oratory department. However, he
will fill an engagement here for
Thursday night, Nov. 11. -
According to a statement by Pro-
fessor Trueblood, Mr. Spargo's duties
in Washington areInaconnection with
the impending railroad strike, where
he has been called in conference with
railroad and union officials. His lec-
ture in Ann Arbor will be, "The
Struggle Between Bolshevism and
Democracy in Russia".
EX-SOLDIES PLAN
$155000_CMPAIGN
Money Will Be Used for Completing
Upper Reading Room of
Union
WILL DEDICATE WORK TO
MICHIGAN'S WORLD WAR DEAD
At a combined meeting of the Vet-
erans of Foreign Wars, Gun and
Blade club, and American Legion, a
representative committee was ap-
pointed to devise a means of raising
the $15,000 necessary to complete the
decoration and furnishing of the up-
per reading room of the Michigan
Union. The reading room ,when com-
pleted, will be dedicated to Michigan
men who died in the World war.
N. K. Chamberlin, '22E, heads the
committee, with the following assist-
ants: Wilfred Hocking, '24L, . P.
Lawton, '24, Harry Archer, '23, Carl
Smith, '24L, Byron Field, grad, Har-
old Furlong, '24M, Joseph Morey, '22,
F. A. Sergeant, '22.
PEP MEETING ON ECK
FOR TOMORROW NIGT
James Schermerhorn, Jr., '18 Prof.
R. K. Imnel, Coach Yost, R. Jerome
Dunne, '24L, and Frank Steketee, '22,
will be the principal speakers at the
0. S. U. pep meeting to be held at 7
o'clock tomorrow night at Hill audi-
torium. Schermerhorn will speak1
"or the alumni, Professor Immel for
the faculty and Coach Yost for thej
team. Francisco Penberthy, '22, cap-
tain of the cross country team, will,
say a few words in behalf of the
.ross country men.
The meeting is in charge of Willis
K. Blakesley, '22L, and he will be
vzsisted by Al Cuthbert, who will take,
charge of the cheering. The meeting
will have a double significance as
'oth the football team and the cross1
country squad will compete Satur-
day.
Just preceding the meeting, a huge
street parade, led by the Varsity
hand, will be held. All students are
asked to join in this demonstration,
which means a welcome to the old
alumni and friends of the University
who are in Ann Arbor for the game.
POSTER ARTTST S TO
MEET AGAIN TODAY

Because of the small attendance at
the meeting yesterday 'afternoon in.
the Union, when E. Mortimer Shuter,
director of Mimes dramatics, outlined
the plot of the 1921 Union opera,
"Make It For Two," to tryouts for the
opera poster competition, a meeting
will be held at 4:45 o'clock this aft-
ernoon in room 308, Union. The plot
of the opera will be outlined in a short
synopsis. No designs for the poster
will be accepted from men who do not
attend either one of the two meetings.
Chimes Football Number Sells Fast
Chimes, All-campus opinon month-
ly, successfully conducted its first
campus sale for the year Tuesday, the
football number being almost sold
out.

rollment of Oct. 15, 1921, with that of
Literary college:
Undergraduates .............4,649

the same date last year:

1920

4,544

1921 (gain or loss
4.
(incl. Edu.

Extra mural (estim)........
Public health nursing.......
Engineering & architecture ..
Medical school ...............
Nurses' training school......
Law school ...................
Pharmacy ..................
Homoeopathic Medical school..
Nurses' Traiping ...........'
Dental college.............
Education (in L. S. & A. here-
tofore) .....................
Graduate school ..............
Deduct for double registration.
Total on campus incl. ex. mural'
Summer ses. (total 2194) estim.
Later registration estim.......
Estimated grand total........
(Actual grand total).......
Total on campus excluding
extra mural and nurses ....

500
4=

500
4=

5,153
2,086
444
159
346
93
47
38
442
252
9,066
88
8,978
1,200
600
10,778
10,623

5,048
1,935
547
173
375
78
63
40'
396

--b
+10
+ 2
+ 2
- 1
-- 4E

148
399

+

.9,202
120
9,322
1,300
600
11,222

+

0,05 STUDENTS ON CAMPUS NOW;
600 MORE EXPECTED IN FEBRUARY,
ACCORDING TO REGISTRARHAH11.
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND ARCHITECTURE DROPS FROM 2,08
IN 1920 TO 1935 THIS YEAR; MEDICAL
SCHOOL GAINS 103
SUMMER SESSION ESTIMATE COMES TO 1300:
LIBERARY COLLEGE SHOWS INCREASE OF 4
Graduate School Jumps to a Figure More Than Half-of Last Year's Count
Dental College Falls from 442 to 396; New College
of Education Shows Total of 148

8,277

8,606

According to official final returns from Registrar Arthur G. Hall, t
enrollment of the University of Michigan is 11,222.
There are 8,605 students on the campus, 217 student nurses, 500 ext
mural students, an estimation of 600 February registrations, and 1,3
summer school students - making the grand total of 11,222. The distrib
tion of this grand total is shown by the following table comparing the e

Weather Man Predicts Humor Will
Rain Tomorrow-Reason? Gargoy

Forecast for tomorrow: Skies blue,
smiling faces, cheerful countenances,
breezes of laughter from north and
south blowing all day. Reigning
planet - Humor.
The above report reached Ann Ar-
'-or late last night simultaneously
with the announcement that on Fri-
day, Oct. 21, the Gargoyle, Michigan's
humor magazine, would appear on
the campus for distribution to the
student body.
Report Passed by "Life"
In addition to the above informa-
tion, the report, which had been 0.
K.ed by Life, Judge and Puck before
being released, said:
"Snappy cover on October Gar-
goyle, entitled, The Opening Num-
ber. Good for after-dinner toast to
Volstead.
"Artistic reproduction of S. A. T.
C.'s wonderful victory in the bloody
battle of Ann Arbor, worthy of a page
in any history book, drawn by staff
artist of intercollegiate renown.
" 'Held's Belles', lifelike drawings of
beautiful girls of many nations, will
act. as guides to other departments
of magazine. (Boy, page Ziegfeld l}
Also gives new interpretation of a
broad-minded urofessor, offering in-
struction a la twentieth century meth-
ods.
"Shooting of Dan McBrew"
"Campus genius outserves Robert
Service in poem entitled 'The Shoot-
ing of Dan McBrew.' For the family
to read around the kitchen table, a
separate department is devoted to
healthwealth, finance, a corner where
poets hide their brain children, Bright
Sayings of the Children, and rules for
My Best Joke contest for the benefit
of freshmen inclined along literary
paths.
"Setting Up Exercises", not set
down by Dr. May, but guaranteed to
cure all of the evil - of study. Read

these and take next train home. Nc
to be read by Ypsi liabituees.
"As soon as possible, after supply
ing campus, send 10,000 copies C
Gargoyle to Rex Zeus, to keep th
Mount Olympians and their cherub
in good humor. Would suggest a
slogan - 'Read the Gargoyle, an
We'll beat Ohio.'"
'25 GLEE CLUB TO
ORGANIZE TONIGH'J
Frank L. Thomas, director of th
Varsity Glee and Mandolin club ai
nounced yesterday that a Freshmai
-Glee club will be organized again thi
year and Thomas E. Dewey, '23, ha
been selected as director. Tryout
for the club will begin immediately.
The tryout periods for this wee
were announced as follows: Thursda
and Friday nights from 7 to 8 o'cloc
and Saturday morning from 9 to 12 i
room 221 of the School of Music.
FRESHMAN LITS NOMINATE
AT UNIVERSITY HALL TODA
Dean Effinger Will Speak; Gower, 'M
to Have Charge of Meieting
and Elections
All freshman lits will meet at
o'clock today in University Hall fc
a general assembly and for the pui
pose of nominating officers for th
fear. Dean John R. Effinger of th
literary college will speak, afte
which W. W. Gower, '22, general chai:
man of the upperclass advisers, wi
take charge of the meeting and th
nominations will be made. Gymne
sium classes at this hour will be dii
missed in order that the freshme
may attend the meeting.

scrap line that has been in the hands
of the receiver since Spot was a pup,
cut his freight rates 50percent, and
increased wages. And he ain't doin'
it for charity, neither. But he cut out
a lot of swivel-chair artists whQ were
drawn a lot of pay and not loin
anything."

1
t

mint under recent instructions to
speed up production according . to
Superintendent M. J. Kelly.
Acording to Mr. Kelly, the coin-
ing of silver dollars is being increased
in order that the government might
save interest on short term treasury
notes.

i

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan