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October 16, 1921 - Image 17

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-10-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

BOOKS AND AUTHORS Eugene O'Neilt-
"Still The Greatest Moth'er In (Continued from Page 6)
The World ", Is Red Cross Motto mirt than to have freshmen sweep An Appreciation
the decks it would be to have all the (Continued from Page 4)
(By Hamilton Cochran) the Washtenaw chapter is performing ten successful stories written by girls.
gTo havfehmenpowerful dramas, O'Neill goes deep
On a poster in the office of the is for ex-service men both at the ave freshmen girls win everything Into psychology of man's mind, show-
Washtenaw chapter of the American University and in the town. In co- would well nigh kill me with joy. ing holo y of a mind, show-
Red Cross are the words: "Still the operation with the Veterans Bureau Who is the publisher? This is a ing always upon the individual, will
Greatest Mother in the World." With at Chicago, the local Red Cross makes secret, but it has been asked of me s( serve finally to drive him mad. "The
this motto, the Red Cross is carrying personal inquiries and secures action frequently that I wish to say that the tale of man's eternaf and meaningless
out in numberless ways its post-war in the cases of ex-service men who firm is not a tremendous one national- pursuit of the gold in life thft his
activities in every section of the have claims against the government ly, though well enough known in cer- soul refuses to know as dross, the play
country, involving unpaid compensation, allot- tam fields. Guess again, is excellently, planned and admirably
During the war the name of the ments, and insurance. Many disabled Conditions for the Chimes contest executed," says George Jean Naian
Red Cross was on every lip. The at- men now attending the University are are that all stories be submitted by in speaking of "Gouu," The play is in-
tention of the world was focussed on sent here through the Federal Board November 15. Prizes of $15, $10, $5 will teresting, too, in that it is simply the
its splendid care of the wounded at for Vocational Education. It some- be awarded for first, second, and third fore part of the story which is sug-
the battle front. Nor did the Red times happens that the government places respectively, these to be judged gested in one of O'Neill's earlier one-
Cross cease its labors at the cessation checks coming to these men are de- by Prof. J. R. Brumm, Prof. H. P.,Scott, act plays, "Where the Cross Is Made."
of hostilities. With admirable en- layed for various reasons. In such a and Edward Everett. The stories may The author has revised the act which
ergy it co-operated with the various contingency the local Red Cross act- range in length from 1,000 to 3,000 formed the one-act piece and has writ-
war-torn governments of Europe in vances them noney from a special words. ten three acts preceding it in which he
reconstruction work, besides safe- loan fund. tells the story of the characters.
guarding the welfare of the families Because ' there are approximately South Carolina and Its Stately It is impossible in any limited space
whose men were in service. 75,000 men receiving vocational train- Mansions to do full justice to the work of O'Neill.
It was pointed out shortly after the ing in educational institutions of the There is possibly no state in the A lengthy article might easily be de-
armistice that if the home section of country, the Federal Board depends Union that possesses so many stately voted 4t a review of the work Of the
the Red Cross had been so successful largely on the Red Cross chapters in mansions as South Carolina. Few man who is surely the most promising
in aiding the families of soldiers that these places to inform the men of their people not familiar with the South figure in American drama today. But
it might in peace time extend its work rights to further training and to assist realize this or appreciate the historic with the limits of space, a poignant
to the entire community. Especially them, in filling applications and traditions which add so much to their factor in attempting to give some little
was there need for helping families affidavits, charm. The J. B. Lippincott Com- appreciation of Eugene O'Neill, it may
in places where no social agencies If a disabled former soldier is at pany will publish this month a book only be said in conclusion that if the
existed to cope with community prob- a hospital or vocational training dealing exclusively with this subject. foregoing will lead any of those in-
lems. At present more than 700 chap- school, the Red Cross takes care of his This is entitled, "Historic Houses of terested in the dr 'na to become ac-
(ers have enlarged their home service family until his return. Every sort South Carolina," and is written by quainted with his works, the effort
work to include civilian families who of personal service is offered him Mrs. Harriette Kershaw Leiding. will not have prove, vain.
are visited regularly by trained social that he may feel encouraged and pur-
workers. sue his work with a mind free from
The duties of the Red Cross social worry.
worker, usually a woman, are many It is particalarly noticeable that the
and varied. Individual families re- number of patients suffering from
ceive her personal attention, for she tuberculosis and mental diseases is in-
is intimately acquainted? with their creasing rapidly from month to month,
problems. To know what facilities are and' it is probable that this condition
and state, and how to obtain service will continue for some time to come.
from these agencies is another task of Therefore the national headquarters of
the worker. The local Red Cross chap- the Red Cross has taken measures to
ter also endeavors to interest the com- increase its corps of workers as new
munity in groups heeding assistance. institutions open and new patients OR HANDS
In this way community resources are come in. Several ex-service men suf-
build up to such an extent that the fering from mental diseases are at
help of the Red Cross is no longer present in the University hospital, and The most satisfactory remedy is
needed, the local chapter is looking after their
One of the greatest services that welfare.,Hazeloin Cream
IT IS PLE' ANT TO USE,
Chinese Garden ISNOT STICKY, CAN BE
USED DAY OR NIGHT AND
944- CHICKEN DINNER -- 90c MAKES THEHANDS SOFT
AND WHITE
Sunday, October 15
THEY ALL COME BACK 30c for a generous bottle
GET THE HABIT
CALKINS-FLFTCHER DRUG CO.
Regular Dinner Every Day -11 to 2 ,24 SOUTH STATE ST. 711 PACKARD ST.
55c - Try it. E. & S. UNIVERSITY AYES.
American Management
106 South Main Street
(Up Stairs)

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