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October 16, 1921 - Image 16

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-10-16

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6

CHIGAN DAILY MAGAZINE S

Jiooks Al
"THE LAY ANTHONY"
(By C. D. E.)
In these days when it is considered
the progressive thing to hand out
criticism steaming hot, before th
press has been oiled up for the nex
run, it gives my sourly perverse spirit
great pleasure to recommend a book
written way back in the jurassi
period of 1919, revised from 191
(early Cambrian period).
The tome is Joseph Hergesheimer'
"Lay Anthony" (Knopf). I mention
it because therein the author ha
created a priceless woman, beautiful
intplligently skeptical, desirable.3
weep copiously to think that I coul
not have been the hero instead of the
befuddled Apollonian fellow who was
But she wanted the body of a swash
buckler not that of a bookkeeper.
The girl is a scientist's daughter an
she knows love for the mortal thing
that it is. No foolish illusions abou
life turn her mind. "All this stuff it
the novels about the sacredness of lov
and constancy is just-stuff," says she
"Love is a natural force."
And yet, and yet-I quote-she is
finally "crying softly in his (the block
head's arms. He must lead her toa
chair, he told himself, release her a
once. Yet she remained with her warn
body pressed against him, the circl
of her arms about his neck, her teari
wet upon his cheek. He stepped back
but she would have fallen if he ha
not continued to support her. Hit
brain whirled under the assault, th
surrender of her dynamic youth. Thei
mouths met; were bruised in kissing.
Has she lost her good sense. No
at all. The chemic, biological urge I

the younger realistic novelties in the in fiction. "Three Soldiers" is bound
army life on the battle fields of France to provoke discussion for it is to the
and the barracks rooms in the United war much what Main Street is to the
States. Much has already been writ- small town. 'It will antagonize some
not clouded over. She knows that it remains .yet unwritten. One of the frankness. The dispassionate reader
is the same with "men and potato first of the younger generation to will find it a very good novel.
bugs." She want this man's, this fool's write a war novel is John Das Passos,
love, because she can't help herself, and.he goes to his task with the typical THE SHORT STORY CONTEST
He leaves her for a doll-faced, doll- viewpoint of the modern revolte. The (By G. D. E.)
e brained girl who believes that there result is "Three Soldiers (Doran) Owing to the fact that the Michigan
t is one great love, that there can be which, even after an extensive pre- Chimes is holding a short story con-
t only one great love, that her man must publication pruning, is realism to the test, and that two such contests within
cbe pure. nth degree, a more or less limited field would
I was simply tickled to death when Das Passos has stored up a great detract somewhat from each other, it
4 the heroine (doll-face) was embalmed fund of observations and reflections, has been thought advisable to effect
after a session of pneumonia, and and he gives them in his novel, with a less conflicting arrangement.
s when the thick-headed hero, grieving, small regard for anything or anybody. Therefore I wish to announce that
wandered into the tenderloin and re- He apparently has no use for war in stories submitted to the Chimes may
s ceived a pistol bullet through the giz- general or for officers, the Y. M. C. A., also be entered in the contest under
, zard. or the clergy in particular. His three the management of the Literary De-
I But I might have spared myself my leading characters are a rather queer parment of the Michigan Daily's Sun-
emotions, my indignation. Was there assortment-an Italian, a country boy day Magazine. Acceptance and publi-
ever a wonderful woman as this scien- from Indiana, and John Andrews, an cation of a story by the Chimes does
Stist's daughter? Was ever a woman so artist. They swear most consistently not bar acceptance by the Michigan
- cool, so warm, so intelligent, so de- and show a distaste for neither French Daily.
lightful, so beautiful? I fear not. Yet wine nor women. Divergent as are It is therefore requested that those
dliving phrase their makeups, they have one point in who wishing to enter both contests
g visualizeher with her coppery hair, common, a fierce inward rebellion send a carbon copy of the manuscript
t isulizenh, lovely face, a majestic against authority. They struggle to the Library Editor, The Sunday
intelligent, lely fe, a majy-i against the "Machine" of war and are Magazine, Michigan Daily. A stamped,
doubt on her lips, her young body-. all finally crushed, self addressed, return envelope should
E SOf course none of them is a typical be enclosed.
THREE SOLDIERS doughboy but that is not so important A number of inquiries have come to
s (By . D. S.) as the background to which they react me concerning the proposed volume of
It is only recently, that war litera- This background is true as far as it short stories of local interest. Some
a ture, after being practically taboo for goes, but it extends little past the sor- of them follow:
t three years, has begun to reappear in did side of war. No doubt this side How long is the contest to be open?
the book stores. And it will undoub- was in predominaner; Still there was I don't know. Six weeks, six months,
e tedly continue to come back. Now that another side, which Das Passos ne- indefinitely. In brief, until we receive
s the prejudice against this sort of book glects. He is so bitter toward the ten good stories or until we give up in
, is wearing off and the men who partie- "machine" of war that he overempha- despair.
d ipated in the struggle have had suffici- sizes the ugly part of it. Can freshmen enter the contest?
s ent time to gain a larger perspective However, it is a rather large job he Really, nothing would , cause ma
e and a more mature viewpoint, both has tackled and the merit of the result greater glee than to have the freshmen
r reader and writer will be willing to far exceeds its shortcomings. The pic- take everything.
" turn to the war and consider it ra- ture is largely true and it is a decided Will stories from girls be welcomed?
t tionally. relief from the glamorous tales of If anything would cause me greater
s There are great opportunities for high-idealed heroism so often retailed (Continued on Page 7)

The New Books--
A mark of the well-educated per-
son is familiarity with what is new
in books.
Below we list a few of the Best recent Books:
The Mirrors of Washington...................$2.50
The Glass of Fashion................2.50
Wells' Outline of History-New. One vol. ed....... 5.00
Sinclair-Mr. Waddington of Wyck ............/ 2.00
John Dos Passos-Three Soldiers................2.00
Samuel Hopkins Adams-Success................2.00
Hutchinson-If Winter Comes................
Jeffery Farnal-Martin Conisby's ................ 2.00
Vengeance.......... .........2.00
Rose Macaulay-Dangerous Ages ............... 2.00
Hall Caine-The Master of Man..............:. 1.75
LIT ' University
Book Stores
STATE STREET MAIN STREET
Phone 926 Phone 9EE E
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL

Don't Care-
The girls can wear their knickers-
My room-mate can grow side-burns-
The profs can give bluebooks on Mon-
day-
And Mildred don't have to write.
There is one thing that I insist on.
That is the privilege of eating Sunday
dinner at
Flowers Restaurant
32 STEPS FROM STATE ST.

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