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May 28, 1922 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-05-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

1 iri1Y r1VA1.H1V LJq-iL..I

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Z UN]

112

.:....-

I t the||a e r
t rot otherWis
hed theiei.
4klgua., a sOsa

aerd Stret.

o words, i'signed. the signa-
, but as an evidence f faith,
;d in Tke Daily at tle discre-
te The Daily office. Unsigned
deration. 7 manuscript will
o9s th esentiments expressed

two ,years earlier than would otherwise be possi-
ble ,the Summer school offers facilities for intel-
lectual training and moral culture sometimes su-
perior to those of the regular session.
An afternoon pr evening program of public lec-
tures, musicals, and entertainments is provided
daily throughout the eight weeks. This makes pos-
sible the combining of intellectual recreation and in-
struction with the mental stimulus to be derived
from classroom discussions and the rugged pleasure
which comes from outdoor exercise. The courses
of instruction are almost identical with those of-
fered during the regular session, and thirty-five non-
resident professors and instructors have been se-
cured to supplement the regular staff of two hun-
dred twenty-nine. The comparatively small at-
tendance makes possible closer intercourse between
faculty members and students and the development
of better class spirit even than is possible during the
school year.
Those students who 'do not feel the immediate
need of the monetary compensation to be derived
from a steady position throughout the summer
months, and who are indisposed to an extended
period of loafing should find a happy medium in at-
tending the Summer session at Michigan.

Gifts for Graduati

Grahams
BOTH STORES

.,

........BREWSTZR P. CAMPBELL
* ...... .. ..Joseph A. Bernstein
..........James B. Young
............ ..........Marion Kerr
G. P. Overton
M. B. Stahl
Paul Watzel

DETROIT UNITED LINES
TIME TABLE
Ann Arbor and Jackson
(Easterni Standard Time)
Detroit Limited. and Express Cars-6:oo
a. n., 9: a. im.,-8:oo a. in., 9:00 a. m. and
hourly to 9:o5 p. im.
JAck son Express Cars (local stops of Ann
Arbor)-=9:47 a. mn. and every two hours to
f oal Cars, East Bound-5 :55 a. m., 7:oo
a. m. and every two hours to 9:oe p. m.;
z i :oo p. i.n. To Ypsilanti only-i1 :4a p. in.,
12:25 a. M., 1:1S a. m.
To Saline, change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars, West Bound-7:go a. m., a:4o
To Jackson and Kalamazoo-Limited cars:
847, 10:4, a. m.; 12:47, 247 4:47 P. m.
To Jackson and Lansing-Limited: 8:47
P. M.

G

I

F

T

S

for

d Chairman..... ......--...L. Arnmstr.ng Kern
rda
Hershdorier E. R. Mlesa
. Atidrews
iie Xditor..............Thornton W. Sargent, Jr.
...George . Soan
- - ----..........Sidney B . C at91
,............ i... ..Gerge Reindel
o - - - - - - - -- -.- --.. . H a r r y B . G r u n d y
or..............Elizabeth Vickery
"....-...-. E- R. M*es*
Assistants
erian H. A. Donaitue Marion Koch
riscoe Dorothy G. Gelt . F. Mack
ter H. B. GundY d atlrine ang#
er Winona .Hibbard R. C. Moriarty
rk HarryDn.* oy Lilan Sche
Clrk Marion Kerr R B. Tarr
Coughlin Victor Klein Virginia Tryon
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 60
MANGER.......-----F4RONF. HILLERY
.,,,,"...t"...,f,.., ..,..sfY Albrt J. Parker
... ...«...". ....... ......John J. Hameil, Jr.
........... ....Nathan W. Robertsou'
-------------- - ."... .. , Walter . scherer
. ... ..:..........Herod C. Hnt
Assistants
ont Parks Lawrence Frvrot K c. Seick
ane. C. D. Malloh erbert Good
etis Wallace Flower Hr. L. Hale
Ic Chares R. Richards Arthur Hartwll
Richard G. BurcheIJ A. M. White
lie H. W. Cooer Glen Jepsen ;
ore W., K. Kidder Howard Hayden
raulich D. L. Pirce Blumenthal
eetd Bagerman 1ugene Dunne
ckwpood S. L. Bauer : ohn C. Haskins
antrou C.L. Putnam . D. Roesser
:onlin A. . Morton' J. S. Coipton
James Bernard
SUNDAY, MAY 28, 1922
ight Editor-LEO J. HERSHDORMR
Assistant-Harry C. Clark
3HIGAN'S FACTORY CAMPUS
design of the proposed new engineering
I laboratory building, as represented by a'
e cut in Friday's Daily, is a sample of
are to expect from the new building pro-
perhaps may as well bid good-bye to all
for the campus beautiful, and settle down
e to accept whatever comes. For thei
y appears to be 'approaching rapidly the
I utility will completely crowd out beauty
istruction and layout of her campus.
s the program already made in that. direc-
e present Engineering building was not
for be uty certainly, and what attractive-
ne it inay possess is entirely secondary.
his is as it should be. Perhaps also it is
have the Chemistry building of near-f ac-
n, and constructed 'of hideous yellow
lovely contrast to the red which was long
n for campus building purposes. It may
right that the Natural Science building
designed on the general style of an iron
d that, at a distance from which the beauty
is not discernible, the new General Li-
uld resemble a Ford plant. Perhaps.
these present structures are lacking in
or such aesthetic qualities as might be ex-
impress the visitor or student with a
grace, hartiony, - and majesty if you
ainly the proposed Engineering building,
at least, is little short of an atrocity. Are
f the new buildings to be designed along
tes? If so, why? Is all this the result of
to follow an established campus plan, or
ly due to a lack of co-operation and unity
the part of those concerned with the pro-
niversity expansion? All these are ques-
ch pop naturally into a Michigan mind,
ving such a prospectus as that printed in
of Friday.
be that the architect's drawings of the
engineering shops and laboratories fail to
iilding justice; perhaps the completed
will be no worse than some of the others
s. But if by any chance our new campus
nade up of such structures as"past out-
present plans might indicate to one who
the inside, - then heaven help Michi-

CHECK OUT GRACEFULLY
Now that the end of the semester draws nigh,
and students are thinking of the cheapest way to
get home, and merchants are tacking the "no checks
after etc." signs up in their windows, the tendency
shows strongly in the breasts of not a few to de-
part from the fair clime of Ann Arbor some bright
June afternoon, quietly but nevertheless perman-
ently, leaving behind a string of creditors to won-
der whether their debtors will ever return.
Some great sage has said that it is "collegiate"
to be broke, which epigram will no doubt receive
,hearty approval upon the campus. But nevertheless,
a collegian must remember that he is after all a re-
sponsible individual, and that ,when he contracts
,debts he is expected to pay them. The government
,nakes no allowances for one's Alma Mater, and
neither can those individuals who are owed money
y students be expected to.
In view of these facts, sad though they may be,
it might be well if members of the student body
during the next week gather together their various
bills and outstanding debts, and if there is not
enough money left in the allowance to cover them,
send the whole bunch home to Dad. That might
make it easier to check out gracefully when the time
comes.
TOO MUCH "HOOKEY"t
A suggestion made by a doctor at thetconvention
of the American Medical Association at St. Louis
would change the schedules in public schools so as
to bring the vacation period during the winter
months, running school continuously through the
summer time. This, it is urged, would reduce the
number of, cases of pneumonia, influenza and kin-
dred diseases which are so prevalent in winter.
It must be admitted that the proposition of keep-
ing children in the outdoors during the winter
months, that they might build up robust healthy
bodies is a good one. But the objectionable fea-
ture of the plan is that it would have school con-
tinue through the sunier months, when young
people find it almost impossible to study. It would
be hopelessly difficult to keep boys penned up in
school, with the sun beating warmly down, and the
call to go fishin' and play baseball universally felt
among youngsters.
Thus, while any plan which would decrease the
number of respiratory diseases among children de-
serves much consideration, the difficulties involved
in keeping children in school during summer
months, and actually educating them, would be so
great as' to make the plan of doubtful value.
Don't forget that only a short time ago Michigan
blamed Wisconsin for the poor spirit of her base-
ball rooters, and it's up to us tomorrow to show the
Badgers that kind' of sportsmanship we've been
harping about.-
Don't razz! Cheer!
Elie Telescope
Courage
A breath of June is in the sky,
And May begins to skid;
Arid still it takes a nervy guy
To wear the first straw lid.
- Ima Pest.

GRADUATION

1922

7
14
21
28

1
8
22
29

T
2
9$
1$
23
s0

MAY
10
17
24

T
4
11
18
25

F
5
12
19
26

1922
6
13
20
27

That are worthy
of the occassion

BRING YOUR PANAMA AND STRAW
HATS IN NOW TO BE CLEANED.
Prices for cleaning Panamas $1.25 up.
Prices for cleaning 'stiff
straws................75 up.
We do only high class work.
FACTORY HAT STORE
617 PACKARD STREET
Telephone 1792
OTHERS SAY:
TAKE THE TIME
(Ohio State Lantern)
It is seldom that one walks across
the campus without meeting some stu-
dent dressed in clothes thatlook as
though their wearer had, to use the
army terminology, slept in them "full
pack" the night before. Trousers
with baggy knees, three-days-old col-
lars, misshapen hats, unpolished
shoes-such are of common occur-
ence.
Slovenliness of dress bespeaks a
mental,.slovenliness and lack of self-
-respect. It brands the bearr with
habitual carelessness and lack of thor-
oughness. The person who does not
dress,'neatywill have a hard time
impressing others with whatever tal-
ent he may happen, to possess. He
cannot go far in college life, for his
companions will refuse to entrust
tasks to him when he does not have
enough interest in himself to look
presentable.
It takes only, a*few'minutes to
'press the wrinkles form a pair of
trousers. Shoes can be polished eas-
ily without the aid of a bootblack. A
hat can be blocked at small cost. A
flat pocketbook is no excuse for an
unkempt appearance. The time which
is spent in careful dressing will be
well 'repaid> by the added regard of
one's acquaintances.'
Of course over-dancing and fastid-
'iousness is almost as bad ss care-
lessness. The person who is almost
afraid to sit down for fear of destroy-
ing a crease makes himself appear
ridiculous. The happy medium is
'careful dressing that neatness in ap-
pearance may be preserved. It takes
little time and effort and brings in
big returns.
YOUR HOME TOWN
(Purdue Exporinent)
In looking over the catalogue of the
University, which gives a complete
roll of the students and their home
addresses, we notice the preponder-
ance of the names of small obscure
towns given as the homes of students.
Perhaps our own "roomie" who we al-
ways thought hailed from Indianap-
olis or some such city, turns up with
the unprepossessing address of "Po-I
dunkville," or some other 'small me-
tropolis.
Why all this "false modesty" about
the community or 'village where we
were reared? Why be ashamed of
our "old home town?" the folks back
home, and in fact the entire commun-
ity, are proud to know that they are
represented at such an institution as
Purdue and we should not disappoint
them by disowning the place. Of
course we are not in sympathy with
the man who 'is continually singing
songs of priase about the "town
where I came from" to the detriment
of all other good songs, but at that
he does have a pardonable pride.
So the next time your neighbor in-
quires where your home is, do not
answer, in a nonchalant way, that itI
is "near Fort Wayne or South Bend,"
fbut sing out the name of your little
burg as though he should know where
it is. The chances are that he hasn't
and look it up. Put your town on the
map at Purdue as well as Purdue on

CARL F. BAY

Arcade Jeweler

We Invite Your Irspection

U

Have Your GARMENT

Regularly ENERGI
IT PROTECTS THE LIFE OF

Swissilized Garments S

Phon*
2508

Clean Longer
Compay
-6he )oe of Snergine"
209 S. FOURTH AVE,

Cleaner
Dyers

I

,

Canoe

/

Lunches

Try them once-
you will want them

-Slim:
Jim:

Lucky Guy
I wish I knew where Bill was.
You mean you Wish you know

again.

CALL

where

[ER SESSION
commodate an anticipated
nore than three thousand
chool begins its twenty-
uesday, June twenty-sixth.
ih1e fornu merns1uder.

he is.
Slim: I know where he is - upstairs sleeping
off a headache.
The Profs Say
It would be almost impossible for some students
to have brain fever.
Remember
We are anxious that you submit your novel nov-
elettes for the short story contest. Wednesday of
this week will be the last day that they will be ac-
cepted, so get yours in before it is too late.
One to Think Over
Why do co-eds walk four abreast down the diag

"

Harry

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