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May 28, 1922 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-05-28

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'AIR; PRKCB-
CHANGE

I

it i~an &t

ASSOCI.
ANRE~f
DAY ANDRE
'" SERTI

No. 175

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, MAY 28, 1922

PRICE

_ _ ___.__- - _ _ . m . .
i

AWARlDED
CEMEDAL
R fECORD

VEN ANNUALLY FOR
AS SCHOLAR AND
ATHLETE
101 DS HONORS
E MAJOR SPORTS

nber of Family to
ic Distinction in
University

Gainl

ATHLETIC REVIEW
ON SALE MONDAY
Giving a complete survey of all
lines of athletic activity covered dur-
ing the past year on the campus, in-
tramural, interclass, and the informal
teams as well as Varsity teams, the
Michigan Athletic Review, the first
atempt of its kind, will appear on
sale for the first time tomorrow at
the Michigan - Wisconsin baseball
game.
The booklet is combined pictorial
review and annual of the athletic sea-
son containing 48 pages in which are
94 pictures of various teams, team
captains, coaches, athletic directors,
yell masters and all other officials.
The book is finished in yellow cover
the Ferry field gates.
In anticipation of the future of
Michigan's othletics is the page given
over to the new Fery field house
which is soon to be built. It contains
a large picture of the structure with
a detailed description giving specifi-
cations and the main features of
which it will boast. Pictures of
Coach Yost the various Varsity teams
and captains, the "M" club, Athletic
association, and other organizations
and men connected in some way with
Michigans athletics make up a part
of the book.
EDITORSA9THLETE'S
RHECEIVE AWARDS

obert J. Dunne, '24L, has been
rded the Conference medal, an
or which is annually bestowed on
man in' each of the Western Con-
ace schools for his combined ex-
nce as a scholar and an athlete.
winning recognition as an athlete1
ke" is the third member of his
.ly who has achieved distinction)
his branch of activity. His broth-
Edward, who graduated in '09,
e his name as an athlete in base-
and played during his last year
rst baseman on the Varsity team.
brother Maurice, who graduated
i the Law school in '17, played
e years as end on the Varsity foot-
team and also played on the base-
team.
)uke" in getting the Conference
al has been awarded this honor
after making an excellent record
thietics. He was this year's cap-
of the Varsity football team, and
ed on the team for four years,
eby receiving four "M's." He has
ed on the Varsity basketball team
years, thus .winning two more
." He has also won three "M's"
'ack for his service in that branch
thletics. In addition to his work
the University, "Duke" attended
last Olympic games in the penath-
ad" Wieman won the Conference
al last year, and Carl Johnson
it the year before last.
BEL CGALLS MEETING ON
DORMITORIES CORPORATION
ul Goebel, '23E, 'chairman of the
rgraduate committee of the Dor-
ries corporation, which has been
nized for the purpose of erecting
's dormitories in Ann Arbor, has
d a meeting of all students who
re to solicit subscriptions for the
rtaking during the , summerl
ths, to be held at 7 o'clock Wed--
.ay night in the upper reading
i of the Union.
ie Dormitories corporation is cap-
ed at $1,000,000 and its promoters
ct to sell the greater part of the
k to Michigan alumni. The plan
o employ University students as
smen for the stock during vaca-

MICHI6AN' DiAMOND MEN ONE 5TEHEBBB6TNPNAT9T
BLNNSWEAK MAROON TE

MICHIGAN'S NEW PROPOSED FIELD HOUSE, WHICH WILL BE ONE
OF THE BEST ATHLETIC STRUCTURES OF ITS KIND IN THE
COUNTRY WHEN COMPLETED.
NEW FIELD HOUSE TRACK MEET ENDS
TO COMPARE WIT H WITH TWO SCHOOLS
BEST IN COUNTRYTIED FOR FIRS'T
FERRY FIELD BUILDING WILL DETROIT NORTHWESTERN, EAST-
PROVIDE FOR ALL TYPES ERN, GET 21 POINTS EACH;
OF SPORTS NORTHERN THIRD
ACTIVITY ROOM WILL BARNUM WITH THREE
CONTAIN 12,500 SEATS FIRSTS IS HIGH MAN
Comletiono StructureMayEnable --
omleio of trure ay E Fast Time Made by High School Run-
Michigan to Hold Big Ten ners in Annual Field
Indoor Meet Classic
With the completion of the new Detroit Northwestern and Detroit
proposed field house, for which con- Eastern high schools track teams tied
tracts have recently been let, Michi- Efst placehin thes22ndkannualtUe-
gnfor first place in the 22nd annual Un-
plants in the country. The preset iversity of Michigan interscholastic
track meet held on Ferry field yester-
facilities together with the new fieldd
hous wil oferfaciitis fr eeryday afternoon with a total of 21 points
house will offer, facilities for every aic.DtotNrhr a hr
type of outdoor and indoor sport rec- withe.9 eoits
ognized in the Conference, and will with 19 points.

Journalists
Join

Concludle \ Conference;
with Track Men at
Banquet

1 -
YOST AND BRUMIII PRESENT
WINNERS WITH TROPHIES
Addresses by W. J. Ottaway, of Port
Huron, President Marion L. Burton,
Robert Frost, ex-Ambassador William
G. Sharpe, Lee .A White of Detroit,
E. G. Burrows of the journalism de-
partmnent, and Brewster P. Campbell,
retiring managing editor of The Mich-
igan Daily, comprised the program of
the Michigan Interscholastic Press
association's meeting yesterday morn-.
ing. Officers of the association .who
had been elected the day before were
announced, as were the faculty ad-
visers.
James G.* Frey, '22, who acted as
chairman of the meeting, first intro-
duced William J. Ottaway, president
of the Press club, who greeted 'the
delegates to the convention briefly.
President Burton was next intro-
duced, and also extended a 'warm
welcome to the editors. He described
the University's aims for a greater
Michigan, and wished the association-
all success at the conference. Robert
Frost addressed the onvention next.
Upon invitation, -he read one of his
poems, "The Code."
W. G. Sharp Speaks
William Graves Sharp, former a"i-
bassador to France, and a United
.(Continlied on Page Ten)

A LITTLE CO-OPERATION
PLEASE
Although a section was reserved for seniors in
the grandstand at Saturday's baseball game on
Ferry field, individual- faculty members of the
Board in Control of Athletics have taken a stand
as opposed to the Student Council's action in re-
serving seats for the fourth-year men, and have
issued an unofficial statement that no block will be
permitted for seniors at tomorrow's contest. The
reason given is that such a move "has always been
against the policy of the Board". But the council
still has a plan.
The Student council firmly believes that, as the
representative student governing body of the Uni-
versity, it has the right to say whether the under-
classes shall give way for seniors, and is con-
vinced that the student body is united in its will-
ingness to give precedence to them. The council
therefore will set off a block of seats for seniors,
wearing caps and gowns or carrying canes, at to-
morrow's contest. The section will not be reserved;
it will merely be marked, and Student councilmren
will be on hand to request the underclasses not to
occupy that block of seats. No one will be for-
bidden to take places in the senior section; but all
others except seniors will.be asked not to.
The council believes that, since the seniors want
a section of their own, they should have it, and that.
the rest of the campus will be more than willing
to co-operate in leaving place for them until five
minutes before the game starts.

offer ample room for indoor practices.
With an eight-lap to the mile
track' ta 75 yard straightway, several
basketball courts, and provisions for'
indoor football and baseball practic-
es, the building will be sufficient to
handle all indoor Varsity and fresh-
man athletics. It will romove these
sports from Waterman gymnasium,
which will be freer to accommodate
gymnastic classes and intramural ac-
tivities.
Holds 12,500 Seats
The main activity room of the build-
ing will be 300 by 160 feet with space
entirely clear of obstructions to a
height of 63 feet. The size of this
room will correspond exactly to the
dimensions of a football field. Seats for
12,500 will be provided.
There will be locker and shower
facilities for 4,200 in the building. Of-
fices of the Athlietic association, tick-
et offices, store rooms and drying
rooms are included in the plans. The
building in which the main room and
the showers and minor rooms are lo-
cated will be 342 by 160 feet.
With the completion of the building
it is possible that Michigan could hold
the, Big Ten indoor meet at Ann Ar-
bor. Heretofore, only Northwestern
has had adequate facilities for the ac,
commodation of the big track event.
Will Aid Athletics
The field house will aidsgreatly in,
the development of athletics here, ac-
cording to Coach Fielding H. Yost. He
pointed out that the building would
provide ample room for the five
months of athletics that must be con-
ducted indoors, and give conditions1
that are similar to those outdoors In,
good weather.
Football practice can be held at
night, and it will be possible to avoid
the handicap of ghost balls and light
flares when the darkness falls. Signal
drills can easily be run off in the eve-
ning and in inclement weather.
The field house will provide ample
room for basketball exhibitions. With
a seating capacity five times greater
than that at Waterma gymasium,
there will be no future difficulty in
handling the crowd.
Track WillBenefit
Coaches Steve Farrell and Ray Fish-
er are the two mentors most pleased
with the new building. In the I111-
nois Relays and Indoor Conference
meets, the Varsity track teams have
always been hanlicapped by going di-
rectly from the boards to the dirt.
With this handicap removed there is
every reason to believe that the in-
door teams will make better show-
ings at the meets.
Baseball also suffered from the in-
ability to leave the boards of Water-
man gymnasium until a short time
before the Southern trip each year. In
the new field house it will be possi-
ble to almost duplicate outdor condi-
tions, and by the time of the South-
ern invasion, Varsity nines will be in

The meet was featured by excep-
tionally close competition especially
among the teams from the Detroit'
schools. Including Hamtramck and'
Highland Park among the Detroit dis-
trict, these schools scored a majority
of the- points in the meet.
Allegan placed fourth with 16 points
and was pressed hard by Parkers-
burg, W. Va., who had a- total of 15,
points. Following Parkersburg was
Highland Park with 14 and Saginaw
Eastern with 11 1-5. Other schools
failed to score 10 points iu the Meet.
Barnum Stars
The outstanding star of the meetr
was Barnum of Parkersburg, W. Va.
This athlete counted three firsts for
a total of 15 poihts making him the
high point man of the meet. Hester
of Detroit Northern, and Pritchard
of Allegan, were men who helped
greatly in raising the score f their
team.
Perhaps the most thrilling event of
the meet was the relay race won by
Detroit Northern. The time of the
winning quartet was 1:33 1-5 which
ties the scholastic record for the Ferry
field track.
The final standing of the schools;
who placed men- in the meet is as fol-
-lows: Detroit Northern 21, Detroit
Eastern 21, Detroit Northern 19, Al-
legan 16 1-5, Parkersburg, W. Va. 15,
'Highland Park 14, Saginaw Eastern?
11 1-5, Lansing 6, Detroit Cass Tech
6, Muskegon 5 1-5, Mount Clemens 5,
Detroit Central 4 1-5, Ann Arbor 4,
Grand Rapids Central 3, Owosso 3,
Clearfield, Pa. 2, Hamtramck 2, Battle
Creek 2, Saginaw Arthur Hill 2, Terre
HIaute Garfield 1 1-5, Toledo Scott 1,
Sturgis 1. Other scheels efitated
failed to place.
SUM [ARY
Summary of the events is as fol-
lows:
Javelin throw - First, Barnum,
Parkersburg, W. Va., second, Brumm,
Muskegon; third, Chatman, Detroit
Northwestern; fourth, Skogland, De-
)troit Northwestern. Distance, 144
feet, 8 inches.
Broad jump-First, Pritchard, Alle-
gan; second,- Meyers, Detroit Cass
Tech; third, Marigold, Detroit East-
ern; fourth, Mowrey, Highland Park
Distance, 21 feet, 3 1-2 inches.
Relay-First, Detroit Northern, Bar-
low, Caplan, Turpin, Hester; second,
Detroit Northwestern; third, Lansing;
ifourth, Toledo Scott. Time, 1:38 1-5.
(Continued on Page Five)
ichligan iggles Win Meet
East Lansing, May 27.--The Mich-
igan Aggles were easy winners in
the annual state Intercollegiate track
and field meet at M. A. C. this after-
noon, leading the field of -eight col-

SENIOR LIT NOTICE
Programs and announcements
' will be distributed from the
booth in University hall fromh2
1 to 4 o'clock Monday afternoon.
j J. M. STEDMAN,
Chairman Program Committee.
SERVICE MEN TO
Will Observe Memorial Day With Full
Servicea on Ferry
Field
HUTCHINS OR COOLET TO BE
SPEAKER AT EXERCISES
Service men of the University and
Ann Arbor will celebrate Memorial
day in a combined parade and mem-
orial service on Ferry field, according
to announcement made yesterday.
The participants from the Univer-
sity will fall in at 9 o'clock Tuesday
tmorning at Hill auditorium,, whence
they 'will proceed to the soldiers' mon-
ument downtown, and will be joined
there by the down town contingent.
The entire parade will then proceed
to Ferry field, where a short ceremony
will be held, including a flag raising
and a volley by the R. 0. T. C., as
well as a. short speech by either Pres-
ident-emeritus Harry B. Hutchins or
Dean Mortimer E. Cooley.
As planned, the parade will prob-
ably be one of the largest ever held
here on a similar occasion. In addi-
tion to the University and down
town service- men, the national guard
unit and the University R. 0. -T. C. will
help swell the ranks. A special de-
tachment will be formed for service
men not in uniform. Music will be
furnished by the Varstiy band and by
the R. 0. T. C. band, which will meet
between Natural Science and Chem-
istry buildings at 8:45 o'clock Tues-
day morning, with the possible addi-
tion of the Masonic band. Major Ar-
thur, of the R. O. T. C., will command
the entire detachment.
Detailed announcement will be
made later regarding the definite
meeting places of the seveal sec-
tions of service men.
CAIFORNIA- WINS IN
INTERCOLLEGIATE MEET,
Cambridge, Mans., May 1l,-Athletic
honors winged westward today when
the University of California again
won the 46th annual track and field
championship games of the intercol-
legiate association of America, by a
score of 40 1-2 points.
Competing in the Harvard stadium
against 30 colleges, including their
greatest rival, Stanford university,
well balanced combination from Berk-
/eley rolled up a total 9 1-2 points larg-
er than that scored by Princeton in
second place and 14 more than Stan-
ford, which finished third.
Cornell, nine times winnr of the
titular games, was fourth with 21 1-2
points, and the University of Pennsyl-
vania was fifth with 16 points. Fol-
lowing the Quakers came Harvard
with 14; Penn State, 11; Layfayette,
10; Yale, 8 1-2; Columbia, 2; Dart-
mouth, 7 1-2; and nine other colleges
with scattering totals.
TENNIS MEN FAIL TO
REACH TOURNEY FINALS

Chicago, May 27.-Nelson Myers of
Illinois is the Conference tennis
singles champion; and Frankenstein
and Stagg of Chicago are :doubles
champions. The Illinois player de-
feated Henry Norton of Minnesota in
the final round 5-7, 8-6, 6-2, 6-4. The
mnatch was a battle of wits, between'
two excellent back court players.
Although Michigans players flled
to reach the inals in either singles
or doubles, the showing of the Mich-
Igan teamn as a whole was by far' bet-

SHULTZ PITCHES MASTERFUL
BALL; GETS STRONG
SUPPORT
SHACKLEFORD SCORES
YEAR'S LONGEST HOMER
Fishier's Men Face Powerful Badger
Nine Monday; Final Game
With Ohio Saturday
Outplaying Chicago in every de-
partment of the game yesterday aft-
ernoon Michigan's Varsity baseball
nine advanced another notch closer
to the championship by shutting out
the Maroons 5 to 0.
Neither team scored in the first two
innings, but Michigan drew first blood
in the third when the Wolverines
scored two runs on a base on balls,
two errors and some poor baIeball on
the part of the Maroons. Roby led
off the inning with a walk. Dick
Shultz hit to Dixon, the Maroon hurl-
er, who tried to catch Roby going to
second. Dixon's throw was high and
both Roby and Shultz were safe with
nobody out. Uteritz laid down a beau-
tiful sacrifice and both Roby and
Shultz advanced a base. Wimbles hit
to Torkle, who fumbled the ball be-
tween first base and home, and while
he was recovering the sphere, Roby
and Shultz trotted across the plate
with two runs which were enough to
win the game.
Shultz Hits Well
Michigan counted again in the
fourth frame when Paper led off with
a single. Kipke followed with an
infield scratch, advancing* Mike to
second base. Roby hit to Fedor, who
fielded the play in time to force Paper
at third, Kipke advancing to second
on the out. Shultz contributed to his
own victory by hitting safely, scoring
Kipke with the third Wolverine tally.
Neither side threatened in the fifth,
but it was in this frame the Wolver-
ines hit safely three times but were
deprived of any runs by some fast
playing on the part of the Maroons.
Paper led off with a single and ad-
vanced to second when Kipke hit
safely. Roby laid down a beautiful
bunt which advanced both runners,
Paper stopping at third and Kipke go-
ing to second. Shultz then hit his
second t singleof the game, a short fly
which escaped the Chicago left field-
er. Paper stayed on third, expecting
the Maroon gardner to catch the fly,
When the ball fell a few feet in front
of the left fielder, Paper tore for home
but the throw from Schultz to Yard-
ley beat him by a fraction of a second
and he was called out.Uteritz ended
the inning a minute later by flying
out to Curtis.
Shackleford Gets Homer
In the seventh inning Fisher's meh,
scored their last two runs when Shac-
kleford hit the longest home run of
the year, driving Knode home ahead
of him. Knode was passed after one
man was out. Ernie Vick hit to
Curtis, who chose to throw out Ernie
at first base instead of trying for
Knode at second. Bob then pulled
the best steal of the day by going to
third while Dixon was winding up.
Shackleford then gave the crowd a
treat by slamming out a long drive
which went over the center fielder's
head and rolled nearly to the tennis
courts. Shack made the entire cir-
cuit and easily beat the throw home.
To Shultz goes the credit for the
victory, for he held the Maroons at
bay in every inning, while fast work
by his mates kept the Midway lads
from looking dangerous when they got
men on bases. Neither nine played a
brilliant game, but the Wolverines
lookedtbetter thangIn any contest
since the Illinois game early in the
year. One accident marred the con-
test. Fedor, Chicago short stop, was
hit below the right eye by a foul tip
from his own bat In the sixth inning
and was carried from the field unon-
scious. The injury is not as serious
as it first appeared and the Maroon

athlete will not lose the sight of his
eye.- Three. stitches were taken' in the
wound.
At 4 o'clock Monday afternoon the
Wolverines meet Wisconsin on Ferry
field. Victory over the Badgers Mon-
day and Ohio State next Satjurday will
insure Fisher's men of the Confer-
ence diamond championship. The
Badgers have one of the best nines
In the Big Ten and with Captain Pad-
dock hurling for them, they are cer-
tamn to be one of the strongest teams

ter than that of any other team.. Mer- Michigan has had
kel and Reindel both reached the Fisher has not ann
semi-final round and were eliminat- for Monday, but h
ed Saturday morning by Myers and Elliott, Liverance a

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