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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 24, 1922 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-05-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


1 1 1 1 1 E N G IN E R IN G S O C IE T Y
STO BAOT ON NAMES
WILL CHOOSE CHAIRMEN OF COX.,
MITTEES TODAY AT
POLLS

mas
g and Ouing.

e practical hat for automobiling and
tiff straw is easily broken as well as
Panama is the coolest and most com-
.t to be found, and fulfills all the re-
't and informal dress. Have your
new and save the stiff straw.
ai:-We have developed a pro'cess of
hats just like new.

x....$12

up

aing stiff straws. . .. .75 up
ONLY HIGH CLASS WORK

92

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PHONE 17

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have proved it-and now
NATURE has produced
varieties of pure Turkish

tie

s FLAVOR of the finest Turkish-

NT of the finest Turkish-

you as will the finest Turkish-
st grade and personally selected
ed in MURAD.
To enjoy 100% pure
Turkish at its VERY
BEST-to reach the
PEAK of Cigarette
Quality-you have but
to smoke MURAD-
Try MURAD to-
day and
"Judge for
Yourself-!"

Making early plans for a success-
ful year, William A. Cotton, Jr., '23E,
president of the Engineering society,
announces nominations made for
committee chairmen. Balloting will
take place in the second floor corri-
dor of the Engineering building to-
day, when a chairman will be se-
lected for each committee from those
nominated as follows:-
Publicity committee: W. A. Stearns,
'23E, R. H. Krause, '24E, J. J. Orr,
'24E. Program committee: J. W.
Rose, 23E, A. H. Marshall, '24E, E., C.
Haug, '23E. Room committee, J. A.
Beresford, '24E, W. J. Piper, '23E, H.
B. Hostetler, '23E. Social committee,
N. Brewer, '23E, C, E. Shepherd, '24E,
J. W. Hostrop, '24E, J. B. Vlack, '23E.
Membership committee, J. A. Fisher,
23E, B. F. Hausman, W. F. Moore,
'23E. '
Free Smoker in Fall
A smoker free to Engineering so-
ciety members to be held Thursday,
Sept. 28, 1922, shortly after the open-
ing of college in the fall has been an-
nounced for 7:30 o'clock at the Union.
A prominent speaker in the engineer-
ing world is to be secured who will
talk on a topic of timely interest.
The Engineering society has just
prepared for distribution among its
members a list of the more popular
Michigan songs with the idea of famil-
iarizing every engineer with the songs
of his University. The list will also
be of assistance in educating all in
the songs most sung at Camp Davis
and at the senior sings. The lists may
be obtained from the Engineering so-
ciety rooms or from the offices of the
Michigan Technic.
Will Meet Oftene'
For the coning year it is planned to
hold general meetings of the society
at least once every six weeks. At
each one of these assemblies foremost
men in the varAous engineering fields
will be secured. The meetings will,
in addition to their educational func-
tion, aid particularly the freshmen in
adjusting themselves to carppus life
and in forming acquaintances outside
of class associations. The relatively
frequent meetings have the ultimate
aim.of securing a closer cooperation
of all in the Engineering college.
THE UNIVERSITY'S
COMMON HEALTH
For ages it was almost universally
held that tuberculosis was a heritable
disease and Iconsequently no efforts
were directed towards its mitigation.
Now we know that, tuberculosis is
not directly transmissable. An ere-
ditary tendency or disposition to the
disease, doubtless due to its presen'ce
in many generations of ancestors, may
be transmitted. Where this tendency
exists, special efforts must be made
towards building up a strong consti-
tution and preventing infection. .
Tuberculosis is more or less a fain-
ily diease. For children are especi-
ally the victims of close and pro-
longed contact infection--an ideal
condition for infection (perhaps 70
per cent of all tuberculosis is con-
tracted in this manner). Because oft
the intimate and prolonged contact,
that exists in families, any member
thereof with tuberculosis may read-
ily infect the entire household.
Becoming Class ,Disease
Ignorance and poverty are among
its most noteworthy pre-disposing
causes. It is more prevalent among
the poor than the well-to-do. Hence
the prevention of tuberculosis has be-
come a sociological problem. Poverty
with all its attendant hardships, such
as poor food, bad housing, overwork
and worry, diminishes resistance to

infection; while prosperity, 'which
buys good food, rest, change of air
and scene, choice of occupation, and
diversion, increases our resistance to
the infection and avoids contact with
it.
Notwithstanding that tuberulosis is
more or less a family disease and is
rapidly becoming a., class disease, its
prevention and control should be the
serious concern of every student. Our
social interrelations are so intimate
that none are free from exposure.
"The tubercle bacillus is a social
climber and many a palace is invaded
with an infection from a nearby
alley." Remember that close associ-
ation with persons known td have
bacilli in their sputum is hazardous
and that this becomes especially dan-
gerous when the contast is prolonged
and intimate, such as working in the
same room, especially if it is small
and ill-ventilated and the less care the
tuberculous individual takes with the
expectoration the greater the danger.
Learn the Preventatveg
Every student therefore should fa-
miliarize himself with the social pre-
vention of the disease.
Education of the masses along the
line of right living, improving of house
conditions, raising the standards of
living, eliminating fatigue, improving
nutrition, supervision of milk supply,
solation and care of those infected,
are among the impbrtant social prob-
lems concerned in our campaign
against tuberculosis.
Until the battle has been brought
right down to the squalid slums, we
are all in constant danger.
VETERANS' BUREAU CONDUCTS
TRAINING SCHOOL FOR BLIND
United States Veterans' Bureau is
now maintaining a school for the train-
ing of disabled veterans who are blind
or who have seriously defective vision.
This school, known ,as the Evergreen
School for the Blind, is located near
Baltimore, Maryland. Here many ex-
service men, disabled because of blind-
ness or defective vision, are learning
trades, mastering vocations.
Prevocational training consists in
courses in reading and writing of
Braille, touch typewriting, and hand
training, such as basketry, wood work-
ing, hammock making. Vocational
training includes courses in poultry-
husbandry, massage, cigar-making,
vulcanizing, and music.. More than
500 men have so far applied to the
Bureau for training ,of this sort.
Texas-The Cactus is.out! This is
the university annual and is claimed
to bite, sting, tickle and {rick.

Yi

MICHIGAN'S F

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The high food value, the velvety s
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Lindenschn tt, Apfel Co.,
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J. F. Wuerth Co. 222-224
Wadhams & Go., Nickels

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WHO PAYS T

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now,

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ness.

It

rnfort while attending the "Cap Night Exercises" at Sleepy Hollow we are
Id Medal" folding Stools and Chairs which when folded can easily be car-
taken in auto and will help make the occasion resting and enjoyable.i
ilso a complete line of Camp Furniture consisting of Cots, Tables,
yes, Grills, Tents, Canoe Blankets, Auto Robes and Steamer Rugs.

Made of tt
of plain fo
heart with

N.,

e/ 4ji

11 ',4

,} a I . ,
' ,
". I ,
'bL
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and K nckers

and men, in Tweeds, Linen, Khaki, Whip-cords, Corduroy, etc.
Large assortment, Lowest prices.

Moccasin Pack-Shu, Ladies'
,Army and

and Men's,.Hiking, High-Top,
Dress Shoes.

r7
1 mous Pavers-asyo0 o
Cohgrporation
*rescnl'5
Wit GOD PROJ
wi th yERA GORDON and DORE DAVID
THO E OTHER AND FATIFER IN "HUMORES
SUNSHINE COMEDY
BALCONY - 25c MAIN FLOOR - 35c KIDI
rn rn A rN1T'C A VDRFc TN 4T

es Store 213 N. 4th Ave.

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