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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 24, 1922 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-05-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

[EWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY
OF MICHIGAN
morning except Monday during the Wniversitl
in Control o StudentPublications.
R OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Press inexclusivrely entitles to the usne If
iews dissatches creaitedt. it or not sth*rwl
er and the c ml news Publisuh therea.
.ostoe at Aa Arbor, Micasls, s0e4"C"

qw Saafi.

to exceed;
rpear in pri

words, if signed, the signa-
but a an evilence of faith,
in The Daily at te discre-
The Daily office. Unsigned
ation. N. manuscript will
ostage.
rse tke sentments exprese

EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
R............BRFWSTER P. CAMPBELL
.............. ...Joseph A. Bernstein
.. . .James B. Young

G. P. Overton
M. B. 'Stahul
Paul Watzel '

tt

Chairman.................L. Armstreng Kern
hdorfer E. R. MRiss
idrews
V3ditor.............Thornton W. Sargent, Jr.
.. .George EL. Sloan
. Sidney B. Coates
....George Reindel
..... 4... . .lizabeth Vickery,
............. ......
Assistants
an H. A. Donahue Marion Koch
>e Dorothy G. Geltz J. U. Mack
H. B. Grundy Kathrine Montgomery'
Winona A. Hibbard R. C. Moriarty
Harry D. Hoey Lillian Scher
t Marion Kerr R. B. Tarr
hlin Victor Klein Virginia Tryon
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
AGE.R......----------VERNON F. HILLERY
............Albert J. Parker
.........e.................. . o h .H am el, Jr.
...........Nathan W'. Robertsoni
.... .Walter K. Scheret
. . ....... .........Herold C. Hunt

rewards for merit, like charity, should be dispensed
at home before they are sent abroad.
MOTHERS-IN-LAW
Those students of sociological problems who are
extremely optimistic about the present state of so-
ciety, and who maintain that the collapse of domes-
tic relations now is due entirely to the fact that we
are passing through a period of transition, must
have received a serious set-back at a statement made
Monday by Prof. Robert H. Lowie of the Univer-
sity of California while speaking in the Natural
Science auditorium on the Plains Indian.
Professor Lowie averred that even among the
Indians the relation of the young newlywed to his
mother-in-law was such that, while he could jest
with, or play practical jokes upon any other mem-
ber of the family with impunity, still, when it came
to applying the same treatment to "mother-in-law",
a line had to be drawn. More striking will this ap-
pear when the anxious public is informed that the
relationship just described holds true even in a
state of society wherein thenoblest form of mar-
riage is that in which the wife has been obtained by
purchase.
Accordingly, the press agents of this braggard
era may declare that there's a grand day coming by
and by when the present transitional misfortunes,
in the matrimonial world will have crystallized into
perfect and university domestic happiness. But both
history and science unite to acclaim that at least the
phase of matrimony which deals with the young
husband's relation to his wife's mother has a foun-
dation in the quirks of human nature itself. It is
at least as old as the Indians, and bids fair to re-
main as hazardous in the future as it has in the
past.
RUNNING TO THE FIRE
When the fire trucks are heard speeding to the
scene of a fire, children little and big are irresisti-
bly drawn to follow in their train. Undaunted by
distance or dust, a gay army quickly musters and
advances at the double qtLick, hazarding perilous
street crossings and laughing at the maledictions of
irate property owners whose lots they overrun.
The motor corps, in scarcely less confusion, rap-
idly fall in and 'speed by various routes to the scene
of the blaze. Not to be restrained by low visibility
along dust-filled streets, heedless of excited pedes-
trians that run athwart their lurching course, they
brave death mutually at every cross-street. The fire
must be witnessed at all .costs!
Such is the lure of the fire-alarm and the trucks'
howling sirens. It matters not that four out of five
such exciting chases prove to be either false .alarms
or trivial smudges. The great danger of accident
must be disregarded on the chance of being early to
see a corking good fire.
Suppose it should prove to be a corking good
fire ! Additioral apparatus must be summoned -
only to find the streets congested for blocks around
the place.

II.

G ifts

II

DETROIT UNITED LINES
TIME TABLE'
Ann Arbor and Jackson
(Eastern Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars--6 :oo
a. M., 7:oo a. m., 8:oo a. m., 9:oo a. m. and
hourly to 9 :o5 p. m.;
Jackson Express Cars (local stops of Ann'
Arbor)-g :47 a. m. and every two hours to
9:47 P. in.
LocalaCars, East Bounds :55 a. In., 7:00
a. m. and every two hours to g :oo p. mn.;
ri :oo p. m. To Yp silanti only-x r :40 p. Mn,
12:25 a. in., I': s5 a. mn.
To Saline, change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars, west Bound-7:5o a. m., 2:4o
p. in.
To Jackson and Kalamazoo-Limited cars:
8:47, 10:47, a. in.; 12:47, 2:47, 4:47 p. m.
To Jackson and Lansing--Limited: 8:47
p. in.
1922 MAY 1922
K f . T W T F Si
1 2 3 1 5.
S 7 8 9 10 11 12 13
14 15 16 17 l3 19 20
21 22 23 24 2: 26 27
28 29 30 31
BRING YOUR PANAMA AN) STRAW
MATS IN NOW TO BE CLEANED.
Prices for cleaning Panamas $1.25 up,
Prices for cleaning stiff
straws ...75 up.
We do only high class xork.
FACTORY HAT STORE
617 PACKARD STREET
TeleDhone 1792
ADRIAN-ANN AR40i 3UJ
SCHEDULE EFFECTCIVE UCT. to, ' x
Read Down Central Standard Time
A.M. P.M . P.M. A&PM
Daily Daily Daily Daily
7:3o01:3o Lv... Adrian ...Ar. 7.00 12:45
8:os 2:05 .... Tecusmsek.... 6:2 g12:1
8:2s 2:Z~5......C t~...6:05 11.5k
9:43 -::45 Ar: Ain Arbor Lv 4:45 10:3c
A.M. P.M. PM. A&]k14
Read Up
SUNDAYS AND HOLIDAYS
P. MP.M.
3:30 Lv.. Adrian . Ar, 9:00
4:05 ..Tecumseh..... 8:25
4:25 ...Cliniton . 80
5"-.5 Saline ... 7:15
P.M P.M

TUTTLE S
A Place to bring your friends
Try Our SPECIAL STRAWBERRY SHORT CAKE
Nowhere is the food better
Nowhere is the servibe more prompt
TUTTLE'S LUNCH ROOM
Maynard ;Street

f or

G'raduation

Graham's
BOTH STORES

I..

I

is Made for
Painting Floors
Apaint may be good, but still not

Assistants
LawrenceVavrot
C. J). Malloch
Wallace Flower
Charles R. Richards
Richard G. Burchell
I3. W. Cooper
W. K. Kidder
D. L. Pierce
C. L. Hagerman
S.I,. Bauer
C. I,. Putnamn
A. S. Morton
James Bernard

X. C. Seick
Berbert Good
14. L. Hale
th artwell
A. M. white
Glen Jepsen
Howard Hayden
J. Blumenthl
Eugene Dunne
John C. Haskins
W. D. Roesser
J. S. Compton

WEDNESDAY, MAY 24, 1922
Night Editor-R. C. MORIARTY
Assistant-R. E. Adams
HOW A LOSS CAN WIN
>ite our chagrin at Michigan's recent hum-
>y Illinois, in a game on the field at Urbana,
y well take pleasure and encouragement from
nt statement in the Daily Illini regarding the
sterday's was a glorious game, 'with clean
g, few errors and little quibbling over deci-
Games with Michigan in the past too often,
>roved to be oratorical contests in which
s and bleachers took an active participation.
day, the game moved smoothly and appar-
vith excellent spirit. The victory was all the
for having been taken fairly and squarely in
es of all. Illinois steps a notch above Michi-
ith satisfaction in a game nobly won and
usly lost.'.'
Illini further compliments Michigan when it
CA: "The band, by omitting to play 'The Yel-
ad Blue' in honor of the Wolverines, kept
ctators from hearing one of the finest college
n the United States."
ois deserves thanks and praise for her fair-
ad good sportsmanship. Very apparently she
dly coming to possess a characteristic which
past she has sometimes been accused of lack-
that of being a good winner. Michigan may,
>nder and take lessons.
FOR MICHIGAN WOMEN{
of the rewards open 'to the independent
. of the University is the opportunity of liv-
Martha Cook dormitory during their senior
The privilege, for it is a privilege, is granted
or women who are chosen on their records,
a number of junior women taken to form a
s for the organization of the dormitory the
ling year.
each year a number of Michigan women are
this privilege in order to make room for.
and seniors coming from other schools,
who have not spent their first two years of
at the University. At present more than
-five of the one hundred and eighteen girls
lormitory are from other campuses - twenty
t of the total.
policy of granting such an enviable privilege
ien from other schools may be very cour-
nd kind, but when it comes to be enforced
xpense of Michigan women, many of whom
:ked forward to living in the dormitory for
ears, it seems somewhat unfair. To deny,
from other schools the benefits of living in
: the University can offer may seem narrow
ish, but the fact remains that women who
ent their first two years of college elsewhere
and cannot be, with few exceptions, true
n women, and in most cases at least, Michi-
i always be second in their thoughts. The

11

good enough for floors. You
may have found that out yourself.
However, when you use a paint
made especially for painting floors,
you're sure tobe delighted with the
result.
Lowe Brothers Hard Drying
Floor Paint is made for painting
floors. Contains extra tough var-
nish that stands up under the severe
treatment all floors get
It's called Hard Drying because
it's just that. Dries hard quickly
and stays hard. Easy to apply;
easy to keep clean. Wears and
wears.
Come in and see the sample
panels and ask forliterature.,

In the basement of the Union there stands a sug-
gestion box. Unless it is given more usage the box
can serve only as a dust-gatherer. Why not lend the
Union.the aid of your constructive ideas through
this means?
When are the Engineering and Pharmacy col-
leges going to follow the example of the literary
school? Getting pretty late.
~ Iie eleope
Rather Paradoxical
They sat upon the parlor lounge,
The world seemed quite all right ;
But things were even brighter still,
When he turned out the light,
Great Opportunity
Besides the big prize, we have decided to present
to the writer of the second best short story a carton
of slightly used toothpicks. Dori't overlook the
chance -to win this valuable offer. The following are
some further rules that have been adopted:
The title must be placed at the top of the first
page.
All stories must be written in English.
In the R. F.D.
Dear Unk:
What is the best thing to feed chickens when the
temperature gets higher than one hundred and.
five ? Luke.
Dear Luke:
Under such conditions you had better.give them
nothing but cracked ice in order to keep their eggs
from being hard boiled.
Not at the Gym, However
The students that have been on probation are now
taking the dumbell exercises that the dean has re-
gently prescribed.
Sad But True,
Your fortune never will be found
If you sit down and shirk,
For opportunity goes around
Disguised as plain hard work.
Jnl Pgw Afore Days
It sure is tough luck for a Freshman to lose his
pot at this time of the year.
One to Think Over
Do onions breed more contempt than familiarity?

I.
ii
,s
ii
S:
,.

Wednesday Thursday'
Miss ,du Pont
--- IN--
"oldnGallows"
"ROBINSON CRUSOE"
Chapter 4

OSWALD A. HERZ
112 West Washington Street

Ml

:.:
E

Ya* is n:##. C . SC# #M//Y YYY#fl.................

TWO

MINUTE TA

ky 2). .1. A. P. for,
The Ann Arbor Savnl.

HE ranch owners out west have a prac-
tice of branding their cattle. Every,
critter that comes into their possession
is marked in such a way that no matter where
it goes it can always be identifier. And none
of the cattle ever escape - all bear some kind
of a brand.
An inspector in -the Chicago stock yards re--
cently made the claim that he knew more cat-
tle brands than any other human being. In
fact, he said that he could take you into the
yards when they were filled with cattle that he
had never seen before and by looking at their
marks, tell you where nearly every carload had
been born and raised. It was all very easy,
he said, when you became familiar with the
brands.
People are not branded with branding irons
but, nevertheless, most of them can be identi-
fied by the brands'they wear. But people ap-
ply their own brands. It is not so with cattle.
If a steer belongs to the XN ranch it must

wear the XN brand. But of course people are
not marked that way. They are branded as
"workers" or "slackers" and as "honest" or
"dishonest" and so on. The brand that each
individual wears dependls, not upon his habi-
tation, but upon his own characteristics andJ
these in turn depend upon the habi which hP
has formed. When a person's habits and cus-
toms have been with him snfficiently long to
inscribe their mark the person has been as thp
oughly branded as though a red hot iron had
been applied. And when a person passes be-
fore an experienced "inspector" he, like the
Texan steer, can also be identified and placed
where he belongs. And this in spite of the fact
that the "inspector" has never seen-the person
before.

Is it any wonder then that people
more careful about the habits of in
they form? Or is it hard to under
the gospel of thrift has always been
to the yonuger generations

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