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October 15, 1921 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-10-15

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

- ----------

;P) I IALNEWSPAPE OF THE UNIVERSITY
- - OF MICHIGAN
Published every morning except Monday during the Univer-
-Sity-year-by-the Board in Control of Student Publications.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use for
republication of all news dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
credited in this paper and the local news published therein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
class matter.
Subseription by carrier or mail, $3.50.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press building, Maynard Street.
Phones: Business, 96o; Editorial, 2414.
Communications not to exceed 300 words, if signed, the sig-
nature not necessarily to appear in print, but as an evidence of
faith, and notices of events will be published in The Daily at the
discretion of the Editor, if left at or mailed to The Daily office.
Unsigned communications will receive no consideration. No man-
uscript' will be returned unless the writer incloses postage.
The Daily does not necessarily endorse the sentiments ex-
pressed in the communications,
"What's Going On" notices will not be received after 6 o'clock
on the evening preceding insertion.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
MANAGING EDITOR...........BREWSTER P. CAMPBELL
Assistant Managing Editor..................HughW. Jiitchcock
City Editor.......................-. . P. Lovejoy, Jr.
Night Editors-
M. B. Stahl G. P. Overton
R. E. Adams Hughston McBain
Paul Watzel Edward Lambrecht
F. H. McPike
Editorials. .T. J Whinery, L. A. Kern, S. T. Beach, E. R. Meiss
Supplement Editors ............... T. S. Sargent, T. H. Adams
Sporting Editor.......................... --.George Reindel
Women's Editor............................Elizabeth Vickery
Aumor Editor..................-.-E R. Meiss
Assistants
Harry B. Grundy John Dawson BenH. Lee, Jr.
Wallace F. Eliott Sidney B.sCoates Julian Mack
M. A. Klaver Lowell S. Kerr Howard Donahue
Dorothy Whipple H. E. Howlett Arn~old Fleig
Marion Koch Katherine Montgomery
BUSINESS STAFF,
Teleplione 960
BUSINESS MANAGER..............VERNON F. HILLERY
Advertising.........................F. M. Heath, A. J. Parker
Publication ................. ........... Nathan W. Robertson
Accounts................................John J. Hamels, Jr.
Circulation .. ,......... ......... .......Herold C. Hunt
Assistants
Burr L. Robbins Richard Cutting H. Willis Heidbreder
W. Cooley James Prentiss W. Kenneth Galbraith
L. BeaumontParks Maurice Moule J. A. Dryer
Walter Scherer Martin Goldring Richard Heidemann
Edw. Murane Tyler Stevens T:, H. Wolfe

to Washington next November with petitions urg-
ing the international disarmament conference to put
an end to all war in the name of the nation's young
manhood. It is hoped by those in charge that the
movement will be so unanimous that it will convince
beyond a doubt the students of Europe and the del-
egates at the conference that young Americans want
permanent peace, and it is further hoped that per-
manent peace will result from the plan. In the
former desire it should be successful but as to the
second aim it is doubtful, as a practical matter,
whether a delegation of students will have much
effect on the outcome of the international confer-
ence.
Weighty problems will have to be grappled with
by those who assemble next month at the nation's
capital. The situation in the far east must be
straightened out before the limitation of armaments
can be discussed. Nearly every one wants perman-
ent peace and, a reduction in armaments. If the
latter is accomplished the purpose of the conference
will have been fulfilled. Consequently the minds of
the leaders will be taxed too heavily with the sol-
emn tasks to perform to open their ears very widely
to petitions signed by college men and women.
If it is worth the time and expense to conduct a
pilgrimage of students to Washington merely to
show those attending European universities that the
hearts of young Americans are in the right place
regarding the common desire for a lasting peace
then the plan is passable. But if in addition it is
expected that petitions made by students will have
any marked psychological, moral, or material ef-
fect upon the delegates assembled at Washington
next month there is a question as to whether or not
the proposition is worth the candle. R
There's one thing worse than trying to hear over
an Ann Arbor phone - trying to hear a football
score through a cheer leader's megaphone.
"Now booking football teas" advertises orches-
tra in Columbia paper. That's one social- custom
we hope won't spread west.
According to report prunes have jumped from
six to forty-five cents. This will surely mean a
raise in board prices.
At least we can say our local merchants are up
to date - they aren't charging pre-war prices.
The Telescope

t
i
1

Persons 'wishing to secure information concerning news for
any issue of The Daily should see the night editor, who has full
charge of all news to be printed that night.
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1921
Night' Editor-G. P. OVERTON
HELLO, AGGIES
There can be no better reason offered for the
continuation'.of intercollegiate athletics than the
fact that they promote good will and friendly in-
terests, which serve to establish permanent bonds
of friendship and' clean sportsmanship among the
various colleges and institutions of this country. So
it is, that with a record of more than fifteen years
of football contests, all of which have been ever
characterized by all that betokens honesty, clean
playing, and a healthy spirit of rivalry, Michigan
once again welcomes M. A. C. on her annual pil-
grimage to Ann Arbor.
Trde, previous results indicate that we have come
out ahead in the great majority of games. But the
"Aggies" are known to be an outfit that never gives
up, no matter how great the odds against them,
and it is this fact above all others that has always
made the Lansing aggregation a welcome visitor
and a desirable opponent here. So, no matter what
last year's score was, or what "today's will be -'
we're certainly mighty glad to see you, M. A. C.
AMERICANIZATION BY THE MOVIES
Considerablepropaganda is being circulatedof
late through editorial columns regarding the mat-
ter of education through the medium of motion
pictures. A sane survey of the facts in hand and
the situation as it is would be highly profitable. The
most recent development is the proposal to give a
free motion picture exhibit once each week in every
picture house in the state, for the purpose of car-
rying on an intensive campaign having as its objec-
tive the education, enlightenment, and Americani-
zation of high, school pupils throughout the state.
This idea has numerous glowing features; it has
one glaring one: it won't work, unless some en-
tirely new scheme for presenting educational films is
first put into operation.,
Everyone who has ever attended the movies
knows that as a general rule when educational films
are shown, the audience yawns en masse until the
feature is flashed on the screen. It is inconceivable
that the great mass of the high school students of
the state, who sit with bored expressions through
educational films which are thrown in vwith the fea-
tures they go to see, are going to trample one an-
other under. foot in a mad attempt to secure front
seats when such films are shown free, and attend-
ance is not compulsory. In the army in certain sec-
tions the infantry received first lessons in taking
down and assembling the Browning rapid-fire guns
through the medium of the movies, but they were
marched in column of squads to the movie hall. If
we are to uplift our high school students, why not
put the movies in the schools, and assign a definite
period each day for their exhibition?
And the surest way to Americanize is by the
cheery greeting and the attitude of easy equality
toward the foreigner on our shores, instead of
passing him by with a blank stare as if he were a
Pariah, rather than a fellow-countryman of.Michael
Angelo, Louis Kossuth, Demosthenes, Paderewski,
or Paul the Apostle.
A FUTILE PILGRIMAGE
Plans are being formulated calling for a simul-
taneous pilgrimage of student delegations from
every university and college in the United States

A New Comedy in Three Spasms.
Beneath the grave old arch,
In this, our college town,
Hurrying to their eight o'clocks
Were studes of great renown.
Among this cloud of fleeting folk
A few you could determine,
For there passed Erma on her way
Pursued by fluffy Ermine.
Then arm in arm past the campus clock
"Strode our old friends Herman and Sherman,
And last but not least, with a roll in each hand
Oozed the little frosh engineer Berman.
-Ivan Hoe.
Isn't it awful to explain the plot of "Quo Vadis"
to your girl and then find out you told her about
Ben Hur? Ges Who.
No. We should say it displays your vast liter-
ary knowledge.
Quoth Eppie Taff:
Jim Drake is- through
Performing stunts,
He tried to take4
Six steps at once..
Today's asbestos alarm clock is awarded to the
individual who calls it "scalped" potatoes.
"Willie" or Won't He?
Little Willie-fell down the elevator,
There they found him ten days later;
Everybody said, "Gee whiz!
What a spoiled boy Willie is.
- A product of the morbid mind of Will-er-min.a,
"just an engineer trying to be useful".
Our Latest Song Entitled:
"Two Peaches Make a Pear."
Songs of the Inimortals
We doff our hat
To Minnie Weeks,
She doesn't have
To rouge her cheeks.
- Jay Bee.
News Items
Daily headline: NEW CHOIR AIMS FOR zoo
VOICES. It's lucky there weren't any missiles
near us at certain times in the past, or we should
have aimed for a number of voices ourself.
BulI,
Ills may come and ills may go,
As the weary years roll on;
But as long as grades are given out,
The student will spurt his "con".
- Erman.
Famous Closing Lines
"Could be a dam site worse," said the engineer
inspecting the Boston flood-gates.
ERM.

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DETROIT UNITED LINES
Ann Arbor and Jackson
TIME TABLE
(astern Standard Time)
etroit Limited and Express Cars-6.o5 a.
7:o5 a. m., 8:io a. m. and hourly to 9:10
.ckson Express Cars (local stops of Ann
or), 9:48 a. m. and every two hours to
p. M.
ocal Cars East Bound-5:55 a.m., 7:oo a.
and every two hours: to g:oo p. M., xII:oo
m. To Ypsilanti only-::4o p. m., 12.25
o Saline, change at Ypsilanti.
Socal Cars West Bound-70 ta.M i., 2:40 p.
Co Jackson and Kalamazoo-Limited cars :
8, 10:48 a. tn., 12:48, 2:48, 4:48.
o Jackson and Lansing--Limited: 8:48

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OCTOBER

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9
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31

4
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12
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1921
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1

I

Ann Arbor's

Chocolate

Center

The Place to Go after a
Down-Town Movie
Fancy and Plain Ice Cream

Candy of All Kinds

NOTICE TO MEN
We do all kinds of high-class Hat
rk at pre-war prices. Hats turned
ide out, with all new trimmings,
e as good as new.
FACTORY HAT STORE
617 PACKARD STREET
Telephone 1792

PURITY

CLEANLINESS

Crest Chocolate Shop
302 SOUTH MAIN

AUTO LIVERY
416 S. MAIN ST.
PHONE 583-J
With or Without Driver

PHONE 474-W

A complete line of textbooks and supplies

11 _

for all colleges at both stores

B

THA FWS.Good0oofee"
fiHE outstanding feature of .a dinner is often
the coffee served. On 'this seemingly unim-
portant beverage hinges the success or failure
of any meal.
We blend coffee at our store to suit your indi-
vidual taste - 'just so much' mocha and 'just so
much' Java properly roasted, is the secret of how
your coffee should be blended.
WE KNOW THAT SECRET !!
The only store in Ann Arbor where the green
coffee bean is blended, roasted, granulated, pul-
verized and refined to meet your own require-
ments.
WEINMANN GEISENDORFER Co
CORNER FIFTH AVENUE AND WASHINGTON STREET'
THE STORE WHERE QUALITY COMES FIRST

GRAHAM
Bioth ends of the diagonal ii'alk

THREE PHONES

1500

ONE NUIBER

"When You Buy, Buy Quality"

-N
3'

There are

Toques andToques
We habe them both. 75c, $1.00
WAGNER & COMPANY
For Men Since 1848
STATE STREET A T LIBERTY

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