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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 23, 1922 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-05-23

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.0

PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY
OF MICHIGAN
Published every morning except Monday during the Wniversity
year by the Board in Control of Student Publications.
* MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Asoaciated Prose iexclusively etitld to theuer
republication i ofwanew ithe cr ededtoIt or ntactsro l*
credited Ia this paper and the Jecal mew. published t1Rnra ..
Antered at the pottoEi a Aa Arbor, Mk gn S. as s
els matter.
Subscription by carrier or mail, $.e.
Offse: Ann Arbr Press Builing. Maynar Street.
SPhones: Business, 96; Editrial, -4.
Communications not to exceed 3e0 words, if signed, the signa-
ture not necessarily to appear in prnt but as an evidence of faith,
and notices of events will be publishe in Teh Daily at the discre-
tion of the Editor, if left at or mailed to The Daily office. Unsigned
communications will receive no consideration. No manuscript will
be returned unless the writer incloses postage.
The Daily does not necessarily endorse the sentiments expressed
in the communications.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
MANAGING EDITOR..........BREWSTER P. CAMPBELL
News Editor ............................Joseph A. Bernstein
City Editor-..............................James B. Young
Night Editors--e
R. E. Adams G. P. Overton
J n P. Dawsen M. B. Stahl
Edward Lambrecht Paul Watzel
Frank McPike
Editorial Board Chairman.................L. Armstrong Kern
Editorial Board-
Leo Hershdorfer E. R. Miss
C. T. Andrews
Sunday Magazine Editor ................Thornton W. Sargent, Jr.
Exchange Editor........................... George E Sloan
Music Editor.............................Sidney B. Coates
Sporting Edito................... "......... George Reindel
Women's Editor...........................Elizabeth Vickery
Humor Editor ..................................E. R. Meiss
Assistants
Maurice Berman H, A. Donahue Marion Koch
Jack D. Briscoe Dorothy G. Geltz J. E. Mack
W. B. Butler I. B. Grundy Kathrine Montgomery
R. N. Byers Winona A. Hibbard R. C. Moriarty
A. D. Clark Harry D. Hoey Lillian Scher
Harry C. Clark Marion Kerr R. B. Tarr
Evelyn J. Coughlin Victor Klein Virginia Tryon
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
BUSINESS MANAGER..............VERNON F. HILLERY
Advertising......................................Albert J. Parker
Advertising..............................John J. Hamel, Jr.
Publication............................Nathan W. Robertson
Accounts................................Walter K. Scherer
Circulation......................................Herold C. Hunt
Assistants
W. Cooley T. H. Wolfe E. D. Armantrout
L. Beaumont Parks Paul Blum Edward Conlin
Edw. Murane Stanley Monroe Lawrence Favrot
James Prentiss William Graulich C. D. Maoch
Martin Goldring I). C. Maltby Wallace Flower
David Park Harvey Reed Charles R. Richards
J. A. Dryer George Rockwood Richard G. Burchell
TUESDAY, MAY 23, 1922
Night Editor-HARRY D. HOEY
Assistant-Edw. F. Lambrecht
THE OTHER HALF COMPLETED
It is gratifying to note that the authorities in the
literary college have decided to conclude classes in
that college one day earlier in order that students
may have time in which to review their courses for
the opening examinations. This new change makes
possible an adequate, less hurried, and more syste-
matic, preparation for the final bluebooks, whereas
by the earlier arrangements, under which the ex-
amination program has been moved forward and
the schedule of classes left unchanged, the lack of
proper time in which to make ready for the final
examinations would undoubtedly have been more
or less seriously detrimental in the cast o a large
number of students.
"COMING CARSON"
For an American to achieve distinction in a un-
versity of his own country is an accomplishment
worthy of praise. How much greater, then, it is
for an American student to gain highest honors, not
only in scholarship but also in other, affairs, in an
English university. Such has been the case of Ralph
M. Carson, '17, of Michigan, whose achievements
at Oxford are recounted in a recent issue of the
London Evening Standard.,
The editorial comment is as follows: "Outside
the domain of sport the outstanding personality of

Oxford university today is Mr, Ralph M. Carson,
the president of the Union and chairman of the
committee of the British American club, which has
just secured the Earl of Balfour as its president.
The Isis' in its current number predicts for Mr.
Carson, the Rhodes scholar of Michigan, U. S. A.,
a career like that of President Roosevelt."

whole scheme, the most important, and the most
practicable.
Although this plan would perhaps furnish more
material for our teams, that is not its prime reason
for being promulgated. Under the prevalent sys-
tem, in which a man is required to take gymnasium
work during his freshman year, only too often does
disinterest in physical exercise take place in the fo-
lowing years. Health often takes a relapse, and
hygenic living, so essential to success, is at a pre-
mium. The man becomes phlegmatic, stodgy, and
soft. The intrinsic value of the project should
alone recommend it to the campus.
The jecond part of the program is the proposed
summer school for coaches, and its attendant all
year round athletics. Summer baseball, aside from
the exercise it provides, will do much to instill spirit
into those who study here during July and August.
It will liven the days of those who participate, and
prove interesting diversion for the remainder of the
school.
In this day of specialization, a school for coaches
is indeed a step forward with the times. Such an
institution will supply more intelligent and abler
men to train college teams. Thus, it will indirectly
raise the standard of sports throughout 'the coun-
try by making those in charge better able to develop
the talent of the men under them. It is a progres-
sive idea, and athletics will benefit by it.
Michigan's ",Athletics for all" is a far-reaching
and intelligent plan to increase interest in sports,
and, at the same time, to raise the standards of per-
fection in this field. It is a movement worthy of
support by the student body of Michigan.
LOCAL INVESTORS EXPECTED
Although a large portion of the stock of the cor-
poration recently organized for building ten new
dormitories in Ann Arbor has already been bought
by the alumni, the committee ii charge feels the
need of the financial support of the business men of
Ann Arbor in this project. Consequently, an at-
tempt is to be made to sell preferred stock in the
corporation at par value one hundred dollars to the
business men of this city late this week.
From a purely financial standpoint, the real inter-
est in the project should be on the part of the busi-
ness men as they are the ones who will profit the
most. For every additional student that the Uni-
versity is able to accommodate because of the in-
creased housing facilities which the erection of the
new dormitories will bring about, the buying power
of the student body will be increased in proportion,
and the proceeds of the merchants will become
greater.
But still another reason presents itself for buying
stock in the corporation. The purchase of ten
thousand shares will carry with it one vote. When
the preferred stock is retired, the stockholders will
vote as to whether the buildings will be turned over
to the University or rented at a profit. Thus, a meas-
ure of the control of the corporation will be lodged
in the townspeople, should they buy enough stock.
This is not a charitable proposition, but a sound
business investment. As the erection of the dormi
tories will affect the business men of' Ann Arbor
so vitally, it is only natural to expect that they will
push the project along by buying preferred stock
in the Dormitory corporation late this week when
the opportunity presents itself.
The railroad which has taken the local community
as its namesake might take lessons from the French
when it comes to explaining the tardiness of trains,
Recently a French train was two hours late because
the engineer fell out of his cab and it was neces-
sary to back-track a considerable distance to locate
him.
Paying the diploma fee now, Senior, may prevent
a lot of red tape from surrounding your sheepskin
later on
ine Telescope

Oh, What a Night
I've had a terrible evening,
Many bad breaks did I pull;
I wasn't out fussing co-eds,
But merely shooting some pool.
Get Yours In
The following suggestions will be added to our
column of rules that are to govern the short story
contest. Do you know of any others that you would
like to have added?
The story must be written on some portable ma-
terial, preferably paper.
The plot must be extremely light. Otherwise the
rhetoric department will be unable to understand
the story.
We Were Told
The height of forgetfulness is a student who has
to consult the directory at meal time in order to
find the location of his boarding house.
A Satisfactory Report
The Governor: Son, I've heard that you have
been seen kissing a strange woman. Now just how
was that?
The Dependent: Oh, Dad, it was great. You
should come with me some evening.
One to Think Over
Does a girl leave her chest uncovered in winter to
prove that she has a warm heart?
UNCLE BEANIE.

1.

-in - - - -

4 ,I

Gifts for

G raduation

Grahams
BOTH STORES

i

..

DETROIT UNITED LINES :
TIME TABLE
Ann Arbor and Jackson
(Eastern Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars-6:oo
a. in., 7:0o a. in., 8:oo a. n., 9:0o a. in. and
hourly to 9:05 p. m.
Jackson Express Cars (local stops of Ann
Arbor)-9 :47 a. in. and every two hours to 1
9:47 P. in.
Local Cars, East Bound-s:5 a. m., 7:00
a. m. and every two hours to 9:00 p. m.;
ii :oo p. m. To Ypsilanti only-i i :4o p. in.,
12:25 a. M., r:15 a. m.
To Saline, change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars, West Bound-7 :5o a. M., 2:40
p. in.
To Jackson and Kalamazoo-Limited cars:
8:47, 10:47, a. m.; 12;47, 2:47 4:47 p.in.
To Jackson and Lansing-4inited: 8:47
p. M.

1922
S

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n
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9
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MAY
w
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F
12
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1922
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6
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BRING YOUR PANAMA AND STRAW
HATS IN NOW TO BE CLEANED.
Prices for cleaning Panamas $1.25 up.
Prices for cleaning stiff
straws .... .75 up.
We do only high class work.
FACTORY HAT STORE
617 PACKARD STREET
Telenhone 1792
WANTED -- Students to handle and
sell during summer vacation in the
locality where they reside; a fast sell-
ing necessity, used by all owners of
automobiles. The article sells itself.
BIG PROFITS AND NO EXPENSE.
Call at 1119 Packard Street, near
Wells, any day between 3 and 6:30
P. M.
SPRING LEAF LUBRICATOR CO.

I'

ONE THINGSSUR.
A NICE COLD",B TH-
ALWAYS COOLS
OFF SUMMER'S
SUMMERTIME can'4 stay mad
very long in the vicinity of
a nice cool bath. Turn on
the cold water. Turn off the
perspiration, take a cold shower
and cheer up a bit. Remember
what folks say about the plumb-
ing shops being the place to go
for your every plumbing need.
They are telling you the truth.
Beranek
&Martin
320 NO. MAIN ST.,
Phone 2452

IBM=
IGLE

O'Kane & Hertler
Fashion's
SH O®E SHOP
I 335 South Main Street
'Tis said that

flat heel
fords will

ox-
be

GREATER ATHLETICS FOR MICHIGAN
For many years Michigan has been trying to
broaden interest in athletics. Finally, in the pro-
posed "Athletics for all" project, we have the cul-
mination of much earnest discussion on a subject
which should vitally concern all who consider it.
The plan takes two aspects; four years of encour-
agement in athletics for each individual student, and
a summer program, including summer baseball and
a school for coaches.
Compulsory physical education for all has long
been advocated. Whether credit will be given, and
how many years of such work willl be required are,
as yet, in the main undecided. Nevertheless, it is
probable that some plan whereby the student will
choose a sport, study and engage in it for the four
years of his college life, will be advanced.
To the end of interesting men in athletics, intra-
mural sports have been more and more stressed. It
was estimated that four thousand men took part in
these events last year. One can readily see that all
these activities merge into one program; greater
athletics. The plan of a four year course in ath-
letics for all is perhaps the most salient point of the

the vogue for
summer.

I

We are pleased
say our stocks
completer

to
are

PRICES
$6.00 t0 $8.50

I

C30o
1 s

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