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May 23, 1922 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-05-23

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AA vA6 H WAHRASSOCIATED
THE EATHR miPRESS
FAIR AND WARNER ID~ AY AND IGHT WIRE
TODAY "SERVICE
VOL. XXXII. No. 170 ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, MAY 23, 1922 PRICE FIVE CENTS

CATIN BLAMES
THICK6 FOG- FOR
EGYPT CALAMTY
COMMANDING OFFICER OF SEINE
MAKES REPORT TO MIN-
ISTRY
NEARLY 100 PERSONS
LOST BY COLLISION
Two American Missionaries on Way
To India Are Among Those
Missing
(By Associated Press)
Brest, May 22.-The thickest fog in
years around the Finisterre-Eusant
light alone was responsible for the
catastrophe to the British steamship
Egypt, according to Captain Bebarzic,
commanding officer of the freight
steamer Seine, in his report to the min-
istry of merchant marine.
The Seine rammed the Egypt Sat-
urday night and nearly 100 perosns
lost their lives in the disaster. Among
them were two Americans, Mrs. M. L.
Sibley; and Miss V. M. Boyer, mission-
aries on their way to India.
"The fog was so thick," says the re-
port, "that the captain on the bridge
was unable to see the bow of his ship.
On Saturday at 4:20 p. m. the fog be-
=came so thick I gave orders to slow
down to 50 revolutions a minute, thus
:making an average speed of six knots.
When at 7 o'clock, I heard a fog horn
quite close, and immediately a huge
bulk appeared at right angles crossing
our bow, I gave orders to reverse
the engines, but too late-a terrible
crash occurred, my ship striking the
,other amidships."
The disaster occurred a few miles
from Green Rocks, where the Drum-
Smeond Castle was wrecked in June,
1896, with a loss of 247 lives.
LINDSAY TO APEAR ON
POET SERIES OF TA S
WILL GIVE INTERPRETIVE READ-
INGS FROM OWN WORKS
TOMORROW
Vachel Lindsay, modern American
strolling minstrel poet, will give in-
terpretive readings from his works at
8 o'clock tomorrow evening in Hill
auditorium in the fifth and last num-
ber of the poet series of poet talks
conducted under the auspices of the
American Association of University
Women, and Whimsies.
Mr. Lindsay, whose poetry is, in
many instances, half song, half poet-
ry, chants them in a manner peculiar-
ly his own. Once having heard his
highly original declamations, it is said
k that it is impossible for anyone to
forget the tunes and tempo. Without
this variation of manner and melody
much of the verse is mere rumbling
and repetitive.
Among his best known works is
"The Congo," a lyric chant in- several
parts. This is probably one of his
best known works, though "The Chi-
nese Nightingale,'' from his latest vol-
ume of verse, is rapidly becoming pop-
ular for its unusual beauty of thought
and happy choice of words to express
the melody.
His "General Booth Enters into
Heaven," with its accompaniment of
brass instruments and tambourines,
blends noise, novelty and an old ecs-
tasy, with its theme the glorification,
not of the Salvation Army alone, but
of a spirit greater and far beyond it.

Daily Pictorial '
Edition Out Fri.
Athletic teams and individuals in
action, campus honor society initia-
tions, and annual University events
such as the Spring and Fall games,
Swing-out, and Cap Night, will be
among the subjects of photographs in
the Daily Pictorial Edition for 1922,
which will be on sale Friday and Sat-
urday on State street and at Ferry
field.
Sixteen pages of special tinted gloss-
surfaced paper, with photographs in
dark brown, will make up the edi-
tion. Not the ordinary coarse-screen
newspaper plates, but the best maga-
zine cuts, will be used i printing the
photographs, so that each of the pic-
tures in the edition may be worth
keeping.
Though The Daily has in past years
issued several similar editions, this
year's will be far the largest and
most elaborate ever attempted.
PROF, OI EL
OFINDIANS'VIEWS
Describes Red Skins' Acts of Valor
Necessary to Become a
Chief
WILL SPEAK THIS AFTERNOON
ON ORIGIN OF THE STATE
That the early American Indian was
essentially democractic in his ideals
and institutions, that valor was the
ideal to a great extent for which he
lived, that his life was governed main-
ly by superstitions, fears, and visions,
and that he had his own definite ideals
of life and sentiments akin to our own
were some of the statements made by
Prof. Robert H. Lowie, of the Univer-
sity of California, in his address yes-
terday afternoon on "The Plains In-
dian's View of Life," given in Natural
Science auditorium.
Four Acts of Valor
Professor Lowie, in speaking of the
plains or prairie Indian, said that his
main acts of valor were four. First,
to strike or touch the body of an en-
emy while fighting or as soon as he had
killed; second, to =wrest from an en-
emy his weapon while in battle; third,
to steal a horse from a well guarded
place in the midst of the enemy's
camp; fourth, to lead successfully an
army into battle. If he did all four of
these he became a chief, and then in-
herited the right to tell of his deeds
of heroism.
"There was one other thing," said
Professor Lowie, "for which a man re-
ceived the greatest credit, thought it
seems to have been done seldom, and
that was to rescue a wounded or help-
less comrad from the field of battle, es-
pecially when deserted by his fellow-
soldiers."
Are Generous
"Another ideal of these Indians was.
that of generosity, and individual mer-
it, though this did not compare with
that of valor," he said.
He spoke of the great extent to
which superstition governed their
lives, telling of their great belief in.
visions for which many often maimed
themselves. He also also told of their
ancient custom of uniting for ceremon-
ial worship, in which the priest of-
ficiated.
Professor Lowie is an author, lec-
turer, and an authority on primitive
people in America. He will speak at
4:15 o'clock this afternoon in Natural
Science auditorium on "The Origin
of the State."
PLAY PRODUCTION CLASS TO
GIVE LAST PLAY THURSDAY
Prof. R. D. Hollister's play produc-
tion class will give its last play Thurs-

day night at 8:10 o'clock, when it will
give Browning's "Blot on the 'Scut-
cheon" in University Hall. The time
has been set so that those who wish to
attend the Senior sing earlier in the
evening may be permitted to do so and
yet attend the play. Professor Hollist-
er announces that the doors will be
closed throughout the scenes in order
that the success of the play may not
be marred by the disturbance of peo-
.ple coming in.
SOPHOMORE ENGINEERS WILL
HOLD "POW WOW" AT RIVER
Sophomores will hold a picnic at 5
o'clock this evening which has been
named the "Pow Wow. The affair,
which will be held at Barton dam and
is free to all members of the class,
will consist of a frankfurter lunch,
with games following. A feature of
the program will be a "canoe joust."
Swimming at the dam is reported to
be good and everyone is asked to bring
bathing suits with them.
Trucks will be ready promptly at
5 o'clock at the Engineering arch to

TILLEY TO DELIVER VulcanTĀ°initiate
pADRIIcuT rru oPMmbrsi

MICHIGAN BASEBALL TEAM DEFEATS
IOWA NINE IN HARD ELEVEN INNING,
CONTEST BY SCORE OF 111 TO 9

URnI 1II IiiU1JLLUII~
Plans for Affair Complete; Thompson,
Prominent Grad., to Speak
for Alumni
PRGGRALS RESEMBLING FROSH
POTS TO BE SOLD AT FIRE
Prof. Morris P. Tilley, of the Eng-
lish department, will be the faculty
speaker at Cap Night next Friday
night, it was announced yesterday by
the committee in charge. This com-
pletes the list of the speakers that
have been chosen for the affair, the
alumni speaker, who has accepted, be-
ing the Hon. Robert F. Thompson,
'921, judge of the New York Supreme
court, and the representative of the
students, George O. Brophy, Jr., '22L.
Interested in Activities
In asking Professor Tilley for the
Cap Night celebration the committee
believes that it has obtained. a man
whose interest in student affairs and
activities will give him an opportu-
nity of saying something well worth
while to the mixed assemblage that1
night. He has worked with the stu-
dents as a member of the Board in
Control of Student Publications and
in other capacities and is able to speak1
not only from the standpoint of a
faculty member but from that of a
student as well.
Other plans are being carried out
by the committee to have everything
in readiness for the occasion, and to!
make this year's Cap Night one of
the most successful ever held. Free
movie shows have been scheduled
through the courtesy of the manage-
ments and provisions for the taking
care of the traffic jam, that has re-
sulted in past years after the cere-
mony is over, are being worked on.
"Sleepy Hollow," the scene of so many
traditional pot burnings, is being
given a thorough going over and will
soon be in condition to receive an-
other class of would-be sophomores.
Souvenir Programs to Be Sold
A feature of the evening will be the
souvenir programs, the exact size and
color of the freshman pot, which will
be sold by boy scouts for 10 cents at
the fire. These programs will con-
tain all of the songs of Cap Night that
have become a part of that ceremony,
and also a unique history of the af-
fair. The proceeds will go to the
Veterans' Memorial fund for complet-
ing the Union reading room.
NORTHWESTERN TENNIS
TEAM IS EASY VICTIM~

Vulcans, senior engineering honor-
ary society, held its initiation yester-
day afternoon and took in 10 mem-
bers of the junior engineering class.
The anvil rang from the blows of the
initiates as they pounded their way
into the mysteries of the organiza-
tion. The following men were honor-
ed: B. F. Burke, L. B. Curran, W. E.
Cotton, R. E. Everett, F. A. Horn, L.
W. Kirkpatrick, T. J. Lynch, R. G. Rea-
son, J. W. Ross and R. H. Rowland.
At 6:30 o'clock following the initia-
tion a banquet was served at the Un-
ion for the members of the society,
both new and old. C. S. Finkbeiner,
'22E, acted as toastmaster, and Dan
Kearney, '22E, gave the speech wel-
coming the new members. To this T.
J. Lynch responded, speaking for the
initiates. Professor Riggs, of the civil
engineering department, spoke for the
faculty.
JUNE 2 DECLARED
HOLIDAY FOR IT

I

Action Taken by Officials to
Extra Day for Study Before
Examinations

Give

ENGINEERING SCHOOL WILL
PROBABMY HOLD ALL CLASSES
Students in the College of Litera-
ture, Science,. and the Arts, have been
granted a full holiday on Friday, June
2, which falls on the day preceding
the opening of final examinations. The
action was taken by officials of the
literary college, with the approval of
the President and the Dean's Advis-
ory committee, in order to provide a
day free from class work before the
opening of the examination period.
None of the other colleges have
made a simliar move for a holiday.
'There are two other schools, the En-
gineering and the Pharmacy college,
that are acting on a schedule that
would permit the giving of this extra
day to study," said Dr. F. E. Rob-
bins, assistant to the President. "The
faculty of the Engineering school has
decided that the time could not be
spared from classes, while the College
of Pharmacy has not yet reported
whether it will hold classes or not
on that day."
MICHIGAN'S CRACK GOLF
TEAM DEFEATS ILLINOIS

6oo 'Ensians Yet
T oBe Called For
All 1922 Michiganensians must be
called for between 1 and 4:30 o'clock
this afternoon in the east basement o
the Library. More than 600 of the
yearbooks still remain because hold-
ers of receipts have failed to come for
their books. It is imperative that they
be distributed today, according to Rob-
ert F. Wieneke, '22, business manager.
Those who have lost their receipts'
are requested to call at the office of'
the business manager in the Press
building, and obtain a duplicate. Ev-
eryone is required to present his re--1
ceipt, or the equivalent, and some
means of identification, preferably a
treasurer's receipt. Those obtaining
books for others must bring a letter
of authorization from the person con-
cerned.
HIGH SCHOOL EITOS
MEET HERETHIS WEEK
MEETING BEING SPONSORED BY
SIGMA DELTA CHI
MEMBERS
It is expected that close to 75 men1
who are editing high school papers
and acting as faculty advisers will at-
tend the high school editors' confer-'
ence to be held here May 25 to 27.
The convention, which is the first of'
its kind ever to be held in this state
is being sponsored by Sigma Delta Chi,
national professional journalistic fra-
ternity, and if this conference is mark-'
ed by the success with which it is'
anticipated, it will probably become an
annual event.
The purpose of the conference is an'
interchange of ideas among the editors,
a discussion of special problems in
the editing of papers, and the stimu-
lation of further co-operation, 13 sec-
ondary schools are to be represented.
Lee A White, of the Detroit News,
T. Hawley Tapping, national secre-
tary of Sigma Delta Chi, and C. S.
Boothby, vice-president of the Jahn
and Oliver Engraving company will
be the principal speakers at the con-
ference.
Thenvisitors will be in Ann Arbor
during the Cap Night festivities which
they will attend, and they will also
have the opportunity of seeing the
baseball game with Chicago, May 27,
the interscholastic track meet, and of
being guests at the interscholastic
banquet, May 27.
3 SERIOUSLY INJURED
IN 4 AUTO CCIDNTS
TWO STUDENTS NARROWLY ES-
CAPE INJURY WHEN FORD
RUNS INTO DITCH
Several auto accidents occurred int
and near Ann Arbor Sunday afternoon,
resulting in serious injuries to three
people and the wrecking to four cars.a
Andrew King, a resident of Wayne,
was seriously injured when the Essex
touring car which he was driving turn-
ed turtle on Washtenaw avenue, be-
tween Ann Arbor and Ypsilanti. He
was rushed to the University hospital
where a broken skull resulting from
the accident, was treated. Late yes-
terday afternoon his condition, though
serious, was reported hopeful.
A Dodge car driven by Joseph Zylka,
of Hamtramck, and containing five
other passengers, overturned on Wash-
tenaw avenue just west of the County
Farm and two women occupants of
the car sustained fractured limbs..
They were taken to Hamtramck.

Two unidentified students narrowly
escaped injury when a Ford which
they were driving ran into the ditch
on Washtenaw avenue near the city
limits. The car was partially de-
molished.
A car driven by Guy Walters, of Ann
Arbor, was badly damaged when it
crashed into an interurban at the cor-
ner of Liberty and Main streets Sunday
afternoon. The driver, who escaped
serious injury, said that his brakes
failed to work when he attempted to
stop the car.
Senior Engineers' Canes Arrive
Canes for the senior engineers have
arrived and will be distributed this
morning at the Engineering society

LIVERANCE STARTS GAME BUT IS
FORCED TO RETIRE IN
FIRST
WIMBLES; SHACKLEFORD
LEAD VARSITY HITTING
Wolverines Tie Score in Ninth Frame
By Counting Four Runs, In.
eluding Homer
(Special to The Daily)
Iowa City, Ia., May 22.-Michigan
defeated Iowa here today in the
eleventh inning when Shackleford
singled through the infield with Wim-
bles on third base. Shackleford was
the hitting star of the game as his
home run in the ninth tied the score
Wimbles was also hitting the ball
hard, getting four hits in six trips
to the plate.
Iowa batted first and fell on Liver-
ance for four runs, twostriples and a
double aiding in the scoring. Shultz
then relieved him and held Iowa to
five runs until relieved by Dixon in
the tenth.
The Michigan team scored two runs
in the second but went scoreless from
then until the seventh, when five hits
and a base on balls netted them three
runs.
..Michigan Ties It Up in Ninth
Frohwein, Iowa pitcher, began to
weaken in the ninth and after the first
wo men hit safely, he was relieved
by Becker. Knode tripled and Shac-
kleford made his home run before
Michigan was retired with four runs
chalked up to their credit.
Wimbles, first up in the eleventh
doubled, was sacrificed to third and
scored on Shackleford's single. The
game almost became a prize fight in
the ninthtwhendthe Michigan players
objected to a decision of the umpire
claiming that the Iowa third baseman
had held the runner. It would have
been the tying run if he had been
safe.
Vick Robbed of Hit
Vick was robbed of a sure hit when
his hot line drive hit Hicks' glove,
shot up in the air and. was caught by
(Continued on Page Eight)
PI DELTA EPSILON
TO INITIATE TODAY
Pi Delta Epsilon, national honorary
journalistic society, will initiate nine
men at their annual initiation to be
held at 4 o'clock this afternoon at the
Union.
Following the initiation an initiation
banquet will be tendered the new
members at 6:15 o'clockrin the Union.
Prof. Morris P. Tilley will be the prin-
cipal speaker, and other speeches of
welcome will be addressed to the new
members by the active members.
VARSITY GLEE CLUBS MAKE
PLANS FOR COMING SEASON
Extensive Trip is Hoped for By New
Officers Elected Last
Night
Plans were formulated last evening
at the Varsity Glee and Mandolin club
meeting for the coming season. After
the financial report of the year's work,
and remarks about the future by
Robert Campbell treasurer of the Un-
iversity. Dale Kirk, '23M, retiring
manager, spoke of the remarkable pro-
gress made during theyear.
An invitation to participate in an
intercollegiate Glee club contest to be
held next year in Chicago is being
considered. The winners of this event
are to compete with Eastern intercol-
legiate contest. Careful consideration
is being given to an extensive trip for
the club next year, possibly to the
Pacific.
The new officers of the club are:
President, W. G. Bettens; secretary,
W. G. Hartle; leader, Tom De*ey;
Manager James C. Stevens, '23, an-
nounced the following assistant man-
ngers for netx year: William Foster,
'23, John Russell, '24, Chester Matby,
'24.

THE DAILY
There will be a meeting of the en-
tire editorial staff and tryouts at 5
o'clock this afternoon.
The Daily announces the appoint-
ment of X. W. Cooper, W. K. Kidder,
D; L. Pierce, C. L. Hagerman, S. L.
Bauer. C. L. Putnam, A. S. Morton,
James Bernard, K. C. Seick, Herbert
Good, H. L. Hale, Arthur Hartwell, A.
M. White, Glen Jepsen, Howard Hay-
den, J. Blumenthal, Eugene Dunne,
John C. Haskins, W. D. Roesser and J.

LOSES ALL SIX MATCHES
VARSITY IN STRAIGHT
SETS

TOI WINS

4TH CONSECUTIVE
WITH SCORE OF
12 TO 11'

MATCHI

Northwestern's tennis team looked
woefully weak before the attack of
Michigan's racquet aggregation at
Ferry field yesterday afternoon, los-
ing all of the six matches played to
the Wolverines in straight sets.
Captain Merkel of Michigan took
things rather easy with - Newey of
Northwestern, winning his match by
the score of 6-2, 6-3. The Wolverine
proved too steady and consistent for
his opponent.
In the second match George Rein-
del, Jr., playing number two for Mich-
igan, drove his way to a 6-2, 6-0 vic-
tory over Schmidt of Northwestern.
Reindel's deep cross-court drive was
working well and his net playing
proved quite effective.
Rorich of Michigan trampled over
Brown of Northwestern by the scores
of 6-2, 6-1 in an easy match on court
number three. Rorich was lobbing ef-
fectively and encountered little diffi-
culty with the Purple and Gold rac-
queters.
Sanchez showed up in the best form
he has displayed this season and eas-
ily won from Thomson in straight
sets, the scores being 6-2, 6-3.
Merkel and Reindel defeated Newey
and Schmidt in the first of the dou-
bles matches by the scores of 6-2, 6-1.
The Wolverine doubles combination
was too much for the Northwestern
duet.
In the second doubles match Zemon
and Kline paired up for Michigan.
Thompson and Brown were no match
for them and lost in straight sets by
6-1., 6-3 scores.
PART OF NEW UNDERCLASS
CONDUCT COMnMITTEE CHOSEN
The underclass conduct committee
that will serve next year has been
chosen in part and will hold its first
meeting at 7:30 o'clock tonight at the
Union. The two committees, consist-
ing of '24 and '25 men, will meet to-
gether at this time in order that the
members of the new committee may
receive some information as to their

TICKETS ON SALE FOR '22E
BANQUET TO BE HELD JUNE

Michigan's crack golf team won
their fourth consecutive match yes-
terday by defeating Illinois 12 to 11,
The winner was not decided until the
last match came in with six points
for Michigan. Both teams played
fine golf throughout the day and al-
most perfect golf featured the 'best
ball foursome in the afternoon.
Rolfe, former Western junior cham-
pion, playing first man on the Illi-
nois team, and Frederickson, also of
Illinois, both had 73's in the morning
matches, the latter shooting a 34 on
the first nine. Captain Winters of
Michigan played fine golf during the
morning and although he missed some
comparatively easy putts, scored a
76. Smith had a hard time getting
started and was five down to Fred-
rickson on the first nine. He hit his
stride on the second nine and won
it by one hole but this was not enough
margin to give him the match and Il-
linois took two points and Michigan
one. Steketee, paired with Novotny,
was way off and although his opponent
shot a poor 80, Illinois won two points
on the match. The morning matches
ended with the score 7 to 4 in Illi-
nois' favor.
In the best ball ,foursomes in the
afternoon Michigan should have come
through with a clean slate. Winters
and Steketee had a fine best ball of
34 on the first nine, while Rolfe and
Captain Novotny shot a 37.
In the other match Loeb and Smith,
with a 71, won both nines, adding six
points to Michigan's score and decid-
ing the winner of the whole match.
MEMBERS OF WHIMSIES STAFF
ATTEND BANQUET AT UNION
Whimsies' first anual banquet was
held last night at the Union. Attend-
ance included this year's staff of the,
magazine, Prof. R. W. Cowden and
Mrs. Cowden, Mr. and Mrs. Robert
Frost, and the newly-appointed mem-
bers of the staff for next year: Charles
Andrews, Velma Carter, and Dorothy

ll

Tickets are now on sale at the Un-
ion and Engineering building for the
senior engineers annual banquet to be
held this year on June 1 at the Un-
ion. They sell for $2.00 and may be
obtained by any graduating engineer
on calling for them.
This year President Marion L. Bur-
ton, Dean Mortimer E. Cooley of the
engineering college, and other prom-
inent faculty men will address the
soon to be alumni at their banquet.
Thomas H. Spain, '22E, chairman of
the committee promised that smokes
and music that are unexcelled will be
offered. "Al" Cuthbert, '22E, will act
as toastmaster.
Michigan Alumnus Dies
0. H. Sutherland, a graduate of the
University, died at his home in Owos-
so on Sunday. He was a member of
the class of '17 and belonged to the

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