100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 17, 1922 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-05-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I

LY FAIR

' -

Lw rtrnx rnt

DAY ANDNI) GHTN
SERlVICE

No.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN WEDNESDAY, MAY 17, 1922

PRICE FIV (

t

_______________.__._._. . _.....f .. W.-,..Sfl ,.... n. e . * w.

IN S OPEN
STiVAL BY
4M TONIGHT
WPHONY HERE TO
9THI ANNUAL

MLEE IS SOLOIST
FIRST OF CONCERTS
y, Originator of Idea, to Miss
Musical Week for First
Time-,
Arbor's twenty-ninth annual
estival, requiring the work of
horal Union of 300 voices, the
'o Symphony orchestra of 70
s under Frederick Stock, and 10
ally known soloists, will open at
>4 tonight in Hill auditorium
,n orchestra program at which
Chamlee, tenor with the Metro-
i Opera company, will be solo-
Stanley Sends Regards
festival will be the first at
Dr. A. A. Stanley, former head
School of Music and originator
festival, has not had an active
He is with the festival ,in
it, however, as a letter just re-
from Germany shows. He wish-
festival success, and seems
lastic over the programs, with
he has kept close -touch.
o Chamlee, tonight's solist, is
erican who has made exception-
apid progress with the Metro-
i Opera company. His success1
en due to a voice of unusual
neity and power, which he uses
kill. He is also said to have
nt diction, as well as talent as

Druids To Reveal
S'Ancient Secrets'
Fifteen men, whose merit 'has been
demonstrated, will gather around the
Druid rock at 4:45 o'clock this after-
noon preparatory to the learning of
the secrets of the ancient and mystic
order of the Druids, senior literary
honor society.
The awenydds, once having given
themselves over to the master of the
ceremonies, will withdraw with their
tutors and forget the outside world
while they are being instructed in the
manners and customs of the ancient
men. In submitting to the tutelage of
these men ofl the forests, the neo-
phytes must prove to the inner circle
as they have proved to the outer world
that they are worthy of the honor to
be conferred upon them.
Following the ceremonies the awe-
nydds will be the guests of their ben-
efactors at a banquet, after which the
innermost mysteries will be revealed
and they will be qualified to wear the
robe o the order.
°PKI BETA KAPPA
Committee on Election Announces
Names of Those.
Honored
McLAUGHLIN OF CHICAGO WILL
ADDRESS BANQUET NAY 24
Sixty-five students awe to receive su-
preme. recognition in scholastic fields
when Phi Beta Kappa, international
honorary scholastic society, hoids its
initiation banquet Wednesday, May
24, at the Union.
Prof. Andrew C. McLaughlin, head
of the history department at Chicago
university, is to give the address of
the evening, choosing as his subject
"The Prevailiig Pessimism."
The seniors Who were elected to the
honorary society by the committee in
charge -are announced as follows: Es-
taban R. Abad, Alma B. Ackley, Mar-
garet E. Adams, -Amos C. Anderson,
Eva Anderson, Dorothy G. Avery,
Stewart T. Beach, Forman G. Brown,
Stella Brunt, Henry C. Calvi, Elinor
L. Chamberlain, Helen M. Chambers,
Ernest A. Chapelle, Sadie M. Cnos-
sen, Sidney B. Coates, Leonene A.
Dahlstrom, Eloise Fitch, Clifford H.
Folz, Violet H. Foster, Norma A. Ful-
ler, Edna A. Groff, Harry A. Hart,
Rosamunde A. Hopkins, William H.
Husband, Gertrude H. Hellenthal, Jen-
nie. S. Johnson, Florence S. Kelley,
Fred B. Kniffen, Sigmund Kunstader,
Frank H. Lee, John B. Leghly, Ben
W. Lewis, Charles W. Lewis, Rita I.
Iove, Carol G. McDonald, Wesley
Marston, Wendell S. Miller, Ruth M.
Mills, Natalie Morgan, Madge 1. New-
lin, Esther D. Nyland, Gerald P. Over-
ton, Evangeline Parker, Esther E.
Pearce, Rose B. Phelps, Mary F. Ran-
dall, Thekla E. Roese, Jacob Rogvoy,
Robert Rothman, Sidney Sarasohn,
Donald Scott, Harold W. Scott, Wil-
liam G. Sharpe, Jr., Florence A. Shir-
ey, Doris M. Sprague, Jean A. Th6m-
as, Alice L. Tugar, John W. Vander-
wilt, Mary B. Wagner, Egbert H.
Walker, Hilda E. Wester, Albert .
Wier, Clarabelle L. Wiggins, Lela M.
Witter, Ellen P. Wodero.
The following oflcers were elected
for next year: President, Prof. Charles
H. Cooley, of the sociology depart-
ment; secretary-treasurer, Eber M.
Carroll, of the history department.
Bfiiulle tin
Pittsburg, Pa.. May 16.--Michigan
tennis team won its second tennis
match on its Eastern trip today when

Carnegie Tech went down to defeat
five to one.

WIDE MARGINS MAKE ALL
SIONS PRA&' ICALLY
UNANIMOUS

DECI-

UNION MEETING
PASSES MA JOIITY
OF AMENDMENTS

VOTERS REFUSE DEAN,
POSITIONS ON BOARDS

Definite Stand Taken Against
ing Right of Ex-Officio
Membership-

Grant.

program will be as

"Academic Festival,"
0 .................Brahms
go Symphony Orchestra
erick Stock, Conductot .
'Amore - Una Furtiva
na ...............Donizetti
Mr. Chamlee
)rchestra, Opus 19. Dohnanyi
go Symphony Orchestra
h, fuyez douce image!
................. Massenet
Mr. Chamlee
Intermissionx
'Tam O'Shanter" .. Chadwick
Mr. Chamlee
Lucevan Le Stelle..Puccini
Mr. Chamlee
c Poem, No. 2, "Tasso,
2to e Trionfo".......Liszt
go Symphony Orchestra
ECHNIC ARTICLES
HUMAN INTEREST
CHAM, 105E, CONTRIBUTES
LE ON "HUMANISM OF
ENGINEERING"
rticles of human interest-
aanism of Engineering," by
Tinkham, '05E, and tributes
a H. Butts, retiring assist-
of the Engineering college,
late Cornelius J. Donovan,
,k the May issue of the'
s an exception to the ordi=
of technical magazines, and
e of far broader appeal than
ly be attributed to Michi-
nical publication.
gineers were born human"
isible statemAent with which
am commences his dis-
le emphasizes throughout
sity of recognition on the
e engineer that to be of the
he must be a success as a
rell as an engineer, and to
should "acquire a liberal
> of ,the sciences and arts."
ht-provoking contribution is
nay well be perused by any
>ecializing in any field.
aainder of the issue is com-
articles of the usual sort.'
uirveying," by Prof. Thomas
1 of the surveying depart-
a touch of imaginative in-
d 'points to practical devel-
E the project in the future,
difficulties can be over-
ohn A. Brooks, Jr., assistant
of military science and tac-
asses the ordinance depart-
ts relation to modern war-
ending that preparation is an
nsurance against war.
en Heinrich, '16E, urges the,
establishment of a mer-1

All of the proposed changes in the
Union constitution with the exception
of. the sections providing for the ad-
ditions to the personnel of the board
of governors and the board of direct-
ors were passed by a wide margin at
the meeting of Union members last
night in the assembly hall of the
Union. A total of 677 votes were
polle'd; 600 members at a meeting
constitute a quorum, with a two-
thirds vote necessary for passing a
measure. '
The change designating the dura-
tion of annual membership passed by
a vote of 577 yes, 32 no. The provi-
sion fixing faculty dues., at $7.50 per
year, passed by a vote of 522 yes, 72
no. The end of the membership year
was fixed at Aug. 31, by a vote of 542
yes, 44 no. The provision for Sum-
mer school dues for students who are
not annual members passed by a vote
of 636 yes, 59 no . The provision for
the appointment of the financial sec-
retary of the Union by the University
Senate council, passed by a vote of
464 yes, 113 no. The provision desig-
nating the president of the Union
as the presiding officer at all meetings
of iembers of the Union,' and of the
board of directors and a member ex-
officio of all committees, and provid-
ing for the officiating of vice-presi-
dents in the absence of the president,
was passed 'by a vote of 576 yes, 26
no. "Campus Election Day" was set
as the date of election for the presi-
dent and vice-presidents, by a vote of
513 yes, 35 no. The shifting of sec-
tion three to section four, a mechani-
cal change, was passed by a vote of
480 yes, 82 no.
The proposals which were rejected
by the meeting were the provision for
the adding -of the Dean of Students to
membership ex-officio in the board of
directors which was lost by a vote of
649 no, 28 yes, and the provision for
appointing a Regent, the president of
the- Union, the financial secretary,'
three members of the Union, and the
Dean of htudents ex-officio, as mem-
bers of the board of governors, lost
by a vote of 639 no, 28 yes.
SENIORS TO SING
TOMORROW NIGHT
Seniors will have their first sing
when they congregate at 7 o'clock to-
morrownight on the steps of the Li-
brary. The sings are to be in the na-
ture of a combined program consist-
ing of a concert by the Varsity band
and the singing of Michigan songs by
the seniors. The opeiing will be :by
the band, a few songs by the seniors
will follow, then Tang and Tavares
will give a few numbers, and selec-
tions by the band will close the eve-
ning.

Journalists TO
Take Nine Cubs
Sigma Delta Chi, national profes-
sional journalistic fraternity will take
nine into' its ranks when the annual
spring initiation is held at 5. o'clock
this afternoon at the Union.
.Following the formalities necessary
to reveal the secrets of the newspa-
permens' organization to the neophy-
tes, there will be a banquet served in
the real journalistic style. Rumor
has it that the newly initiated men
will be introduced to the journalistic
bill-of-fare.,
Speeches in the form of a welcome
from a time-tried and trusty editor
and a response from one of the cubs
elected to the organization will be
given. The "night editor" will manage
the ceremonies and call for toasts.
The speaker of the evening will be
T. Iawley Tapping, '16L, national
secretary of the fraternity who will
tell what theorganiation is doing
throughout the country.
MICHIGAN FACES
Baseball Team Will Try to Blot Out
Recent Defeat at
S 0 *S.U+
CONTEST WITH AGGIES TO BE.
ONLY ONE FOR THIS SEASON
Disappointed, but not disheartened
over the loss of their game to Ohio
State last Saturday Michigan's Var-
sity baseball team hopes to start their
comeback this afternoon when they
meet the Aggies at 4:05 o'clock on
Ferry field.
This will be the- only game of the
year between the two teams, as the
first of the two games scheduled was
cancelled because of rain. The East
Lansing aggregation always gives the
Wolverines a fast contest, and this
afternoon should prove no exception.
Coach Fisher has changed his batting
order for this afternoon's game and
upon this afternoon's results will de-
termine its permanency.
Mike Paper has been shifted to the
lead-off position, and will be follow-
ed by Wimbles; Uteritz has been
changed from first to third in the
batting order and Bob Knode will hold
forth in the clean-up position. Follow-
ing Knode in order are Shackleford
Vick, Kipke, Poby and the pitcher. Er-
nie Vick has been showing a great
improvement in his stick work and
the coach has therefore moved him up
farther in the line-up. With Uteritz
and Bob Knode batting together fol-
lowed by Shackleford, Fisher will
have a trio of sluggers which every
pitcher in the Big Ten will have trou-
ble retiring.
(Continued on Page Five)
13 Juniors Taken
11ly Mortarboard
Mortarboard, national honorary so-
ciety for senior women, has elected
the following junior women to mem-
bership for the coming year: Frances
Ames, Dorothy Brown, Beatribe Cham-
pion, Grace Fry, Luella Galliver, Lu-
vern Hays, Lucy Huber, Marion Koch,
Margaret Kraus, Katherine Kuhlman,
Laura Mills, Elsa Oissen, aid Mar-
garet Whyte.'
A decision made at a recent meet-
ing of the organization calls for only
'one initiation to be held in the spring
instead of both fall and spring cere-
monies. This is in accord with the na-
tional ruling of the society, to which
Michigan was made an exception until
this year.,
The annual initiation service for the
new members will be held soon.

MARIO CHAMLEE, TENOR SOLO-
ist, .who appears ir the opening
concert of the May Festival.
POWER 9DIVIDED IN
DIS5CIPLINE BODY,
Cases May Be Disposed of By Faculty
'Representatives or By Com-
mittee As a Unit
PLAN WILL BE GIVEN FINAL
CONSIDERATION BY REGENTS
Jurisdiction in te newly created
University committee on discipline
will be vested in two sources within
the committee, according to the plan
accepted at the meeting of the Uni-
versity Senate Monday night, and
which will be given final consider-
ation at the next Board of Regents+
meeting on May 26.
Committee May Act. As Whole
The two sources of disciplinary
authority rest with the faculty mem-
bers of the committee representing
the school or department of which the1
student concerned is a member. This
committee may as policy refer the case
to the committee on discipline acting
as a' whole. The faculties of the
schools and colleges will have juris-
diction only in cases which involve
their own students, and in cases
where students of only one school
or college are involved.
The committee on discipline, acting
as a unit, will have juridiction over
cases involving students from more
than one school or collegeof the Un-
iversity, and in all cases "which are
ref erred to it by the faculties of the
various schools and colleges acting
through their proper authorities."
Under the section designating the
composition of the committee, provis-
ion has been made for the calling
into consultation of members of the
Student council, the Student advisory
committee and the Judiciary council
of the Women's league.
No Connection With Dean
It was explained yesterday by Uni-
versity authorities that the new com-
mittee if it becomes operative through
the approval of the Board of Regents,
will have no connection with the of-
fice of the Dean of Students. The
latter will not be a member of the
committee, his capacity being that of
advisor and friend of the student and
in no sense a disciplinary officer.
The plan which was accepted unan-
imously by the Senate is not entirely
new. Some'sort of body simlar to the
one proposed has long been consider-
ed by the University, according to
President Marion L. Burton.
Clever Comedies
Terminate Year
Ifor Players Club
Presenting a well-balanced program
of cleverly acted comedies, the Players
club closed their season at Sarah
Caswell Angell hall last evening. As
an added feature, Mildred Chase, '22 S.
of M., sang a pleasing group of songs,
accompanied by Louise Graham, M-2.
"Cooks and Cardinals," which open-
ed the evening's entertainment, was
an amusing sketch, directed by Ellen
Wondero, '22. An unusual situation

RECORD CROWD WATCHES 1,50
TAKE PART IN ANNUAL
CEREMONIES
BURTON GIVES ADDRESS
ON GRADUATE'S DUTIE;
Emphasis Laid on Trustworthines:
Truth and Democratic
Spirit ,
Appearing in caps and gowns fc
the first time this year seniors of th
classes of '22 yesterday observe
Swing-out, one of the oldest custom
on the campus and one that marks tn
beginning of their departure into th
wide, wide world.
Weather Ideal
More than 1,500 soon-to-be grad
ates took part in the ceremonies an
completed the Swing, which, favore
by perfect weather and one of tit
largest crowds of spectators ever a
sembled for the occasion, was a hug
success. The realization that grad
ation is almost here, whex- anoth
class will leave its Alma Mater an
many friendships will be put to tei
was brought about forcibly by the it
itial appearance of the many caps an
gowns about the campus.
Assemblingon the various walks i
front of the Library the classes swun
into line promptly at 4:15 o'clock an
as the Varsity band started playin
commenced the march to Hill and
torium, led by Walter B. Rea, pres
dent of the senior literary class, an
Angus G. Goetz, president of the St
dent council. Here they impressivel
filed in in their graduation robes an
seated themselves, taking up near]
half of the ground floor. The othe
seats in the massive auditorium weI
completely filled by members of ti
other classes and towns people.
Speech Short
President Marion L. Burton gave t
formal Swing-out address before ti
huge crowd, speaking' on "The Ide
Graduate." His speech was short an
intimate, being aimed directly at tin
seniors, outlining for them the:
course as loyal Michigan men afte
graduation and giving them pontei
when they are men of the world. l
his introduction he brought out ti
importance and significance of Swin
out and urged the men to all be pre:
ent at the rehearsals for Commence
ment, which are coming soon.
As to the qualities of an ideal gra
uate the President said, "You will fir
be expected to be intelligent." H
then outlined the seriousness of thi
saying that many graduate's brai
were in his diploma. The next qnal
ty he gave' as trustworthiness. E
laid much stress on this, saying, 1
the seniors, "Your education has ni
been complete unless you have al
sorbed a deep' appreciation for =th
quality." And lastly he told-th set
fors to be true.
The President's speech was full
definitions, all bringing home what a
ideal graduate and alumnus of Ui
University of Michigan is and shou
be.-
"Always a Representative"
"The ideal alumnus," the Preside:
continued, "must never forget thati
is day in and day out a representati-
of the University of Michigan a
must tell the absolute truth about ti
University of Michigan. People a
going to judge us by what he does. I
must be a public spirited individua
for America is in a critical period ait
democracy depends upon what t
does." Then, speaking from a broad
standpoint, he said, "The ideal gra
uate of the time just ahead will t
the one who can think in terms of t
world.
Rev. L. A. Barrett, of the Presbyt
rian church of Ann Arbor, &elveri
the benediction. Mildred L. Cha
S. of M. member of the graduati
class, sang a 'solo. Walter B. R
president of the class, presided.
"M" Formed in March
Following the exercises -the senio
filed out of the auditorium and col
menced their swing across the cai
pus, forming an "M" in' the course
(Continued on Page Ten)

I _ . __.._

SENIORS SWINGUT NCAPS RA
,GOWNS,-MARKINC' THE FIRST STEI
TOWARDl THE COMING GRADUATI

Phi Sigma Holds Annual Election
At its final meeting of the year last
night, Phi Sigma, national honorary
biological fraternity, elected officers
for the coming year. John H. Muys-
kens, instructor in French, was elect-
ed president; L. Coleman Ludlum,
'23M, was made vice-president, and
Lewis E. Wehmeyer, Grad, was chos-
en secretary-treasurer.'

. ..

+

Slving Out

i
f
I
I

ROOMS FOR YISITO
'lsitors to the city who
s oure rooms for the M
tival period, should apply
'Union main desk from
o'clock today. This is tl
place where rooms for thi
are listed.

ORS
wish
ay FE

brought about by a F;
temTntinzo' nvr~ade, the

,

:A

°1'

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan