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May 13, 1922 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-05-13

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Y FAIR AND
t TODAY

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PRESS
DA! AND NIGHT
SERVICE

p~1

162

ANN ARBOR, MICHIG ANSATURDAY, MAY 13 1922

PRICE FIVE

I I

LLINI ED:GE
D AS CLASH
MEN PITTED AGAINST
STRONGEST TEAMS
IN COUNTRY
RELAY WINNERS
LS FOR VISITOI S

Zengineers Will
Scrub Pavement,
EnterTriangles

Four

it Strong
50-Second
Entered

in 440
Men

With

Men have long fought and strived
in various ways to attain the goal of.
their desires, and today a group of
men chosen to enter Triangles, junior
engineering honorary society, will
make their way into that society by
the simple expedient of thoroughly
scrubbing the pavement of the Engi-
neering arch, beginning at 4 o'clock
this afternoon. This is not the only
attraction offered to those adventure-
some souls who would join this so-
ciety, and the further attractions of
the day will be announced in due
time.
A formal initiation will follow in
the Union and a banquet will be serv-
ed at 6:30 o'clock, when one of the
members of the Engineering faculty
will speak.
Team Leaves for Columbus to Engage
in Fifth Conference Game
of Season
MEN IN FINE CONDITION
TO UPHOLD WINNING RECORD

French Resent Being Accused
Wrecking Work of
Conference

of

I

COMMUNISM BALKS,
EFFORTS AT GENOA;
TRUCE CONSIDERED-
LLOYD GEORGE, ITALIAN LEAD-
ERS FAVOR NON-AGGRES-
SIVE PACT
SOVIET GOVERNMENT IN
CONFLICT WITH EUROPE

Parched Tongues
Vain ly Beg Mtercy
In Fiery Ordeal
Slowly, painfully with faltering foot-
steps the little caravan of scantily-
clad, semi-delirious mortals"'struggle
on. And while the sun blazes down
from the firmament adding to their
almost-unbearable agony, their parch-
ed and swollen tongues vainly try to
beg for pity, for a respite from this
terrible ordeal. But that swollen, and
now strangely silent organ they once
called a tongue has ceased to func-
tion, and no sounds issue from those
bloodless lips save an occasional pit-
eous moan.
But in such a crucible are souls re-
born. If any there be who shall sur-
vive this ordeal then shall they be re-
warded a hundredfold. For at the end'
of the journey stands that mute and
matchless /monarch of the ages, the
Sphinx, and her age-old secrets will
have imparted to 10 young neophytes
ere today's sun sinks .;to slumber.

Week-EndEvents
SATURDAY
9:00 A.-L
Golf..-........Purdue vs. Michigan
10:00 A. M.
Spring games...........Ferry field
2:30P.M.
Track meet.......Illinois vs. Michigan
BURTON HREFUTES-RUMORS"
IN PORT HURONSPEtCH

FRESHMEN AND SOPHOMORES FIGHi
TO DRAW IN ANNUAL TUG-OF-WA
BATTLE TODAY FOR FINAL O

ith chances for a victory'few, but
a strong determination to put up
od fight, Michigan's track team-
forth to give battle to the cinder
from' Illinois this afternoon. Il-
s can rightfully boast this year
ne of. the strongest track squads
Le country. She ,has many veter-
of past seasons who can always
epended upon as consistent point
iers.
r the 100 and 220 yard dashes the
i have Ayres, who is capable o
sting the tape in 10 flat in the
rard dash, whenever called upon.
nst him Michigan will run Cap-
Simmons, Burke, Goldwater and
s, the Wolverine dash squad. The
r dashmen who will run for Il-
s are not known in the Michi-
camp.
Sweet a- Consistent Runner,
.e of the best races of the day
be the 440 yard run. Illinois is
eially strong in this 'event. They
four men who averaged 50 sec-
for the quarter mile in the
e Relays this year. Their most
stent runner in this event is
t, who took first at Wisconsin
week in 50 -fiat. Michigan's'hopes
rest with Siemons, Joyner and
is.
the half-mile run, Douglas, Price
Everett of the Wolverine squad
have a chance to display the best
is in them when they run against
s of the Sucker squad. He has
cleaning up , everywhere this
winning the half-mile . event at
:ndoor Conference meet and mak-
L:56 or 1:57 regularly.
Milers Face Hard Contest
chigan's tilers will have a Job
heir hands to tame the crew that
puckers will bring to camp. This
will fall to Bowen, Hattendorf,
t and Cochran of the Wolver-
It will be recalled that the vis-
have a quartet who broke the
d's four mile record in the Drake
ys recently.
(Continued on Page Four)
LERY COEE D DA9ILY,
SERTION OF VaN TYN

(By Associated Press)'
Genoa, May 12. - So gravely at va-
riance are Russia's communism and
the order of things throughout the
rest of Europe, that a general imme-
diate agreement with Russia appears
tonight impossible. This conviction is'
deeply disappointing to those who ex-
pected quick and big results at Gen-
oa, but the sentiment is tempered by
the belief that the creation of one or
more commissions to pursue an ex-
haustive study of the Russian prob-
lem will prove efficacious in helping
to reconstruct Russia.
Premier Lloyd George and the Ital-
ian leaders are convinced that the'
signing of an European truce as a
preliminary to a general non-aggres-
sive pact will gd a long way toward
tranquilizing Europe.
The French resent the accusation
that they tried to wreck the confer-
ence; they assert that the situation
justified thir views that the Russian
problem has not been sufficiently stud-
ied, and that something nore should
have been done to approximate the
views of the Russians with the rep-
resentatives of non-communists states
before hoping to reach a general
agreement at Genoa.
CONSTITUTION CHANGE
UP TO UNION MEMBERS

Probable Lineup -
IMijigan Ohio State
Uteritz, ss Shaw, cf
Wimbles, 2nd Martz, c
Knode, 1st Fesler, ss-
Shackleford, rf b3lauman, if
Kipke, Cf Lyden, 1st
Klein, if Volk, 3rd
Paper, 3rd Slaman, rf
Vick, c Matusoff, 2nd
Dixon, p 'Cotter, p
Michigan's Varsity baseball team
left at 5:30 o'clock last evening on
the Ann Arbor railroad for Columbus
where they will play their fifth Con-
ference game of the season this aft-
ernoon against Ohio State university.
The. party was composed of Coach
Ray Fisher, and 14 members of the
the squad. They will arrive in the Ohio
city this morning and will have head-
quarters at the New Southern hotel.
The men making the trip are all in
fine condition and anxious to come
through another Big Ten game with-
out spoiling their record of vfctories.
The Wolverines have won their last
eight consecutive games four of which
were against Conference teams and
the men think that this game although
perhaps a hard one will not result in
defeat.
With Dixon in the box, the 0. S. U.
hitters will have considerable difficul-
ty in negotiating hits and if the Var-
sity is able to solve the delivery of the
Buckeye, hurler they should run up a
nice 'score this afternoon.)
Ohio State, while always putting a
strong team in the field, have had
quite a bit of trouble coming out on
the top end of the score and have
only one victory to their credit thus
far. This was against Purdue but the
Boilermakers came back in the sec-
ond game against Ohiq State and gave
them a 7-3 beating. '
(Continued on Page Four)
Ned RoomsGFor
restiva l Guests

MEN

WILL MEET TUESDAY
ACT ON PROPOSED
ALTERATIONS

TO

ROVE STATEMEN T,
HILLERY READY
TO REFUTE

HE

have the testimony of an eye wit-
that Vernon F. Hillery, '23, com-
d The Daily to run the state-
in Thursday's Daily attributed to
declared Prof. C. H. Van Tyne in
iterview yesterday.
i the interview which I gave a
y reporter I said "Ask Hillery, ,he
vs all about it.' This statement
changed so as to read, 'ask the
ent council, they know all about
id I know the change was made at
ry's instigation.
fter having my words changed
'ask Hiller,',' to 'ask the Student
cil,' he (H llery) had the gall to
sh a letter in Friday morning's
r calling me to account for my
ge against the Student council,'
,h he knew I had not made."
ien informed last night of the
ment from Professor Van Tyne,
ry said:
am at any time ready to refute
essor Van Tyne's statement be-
the proper authorities should
deem it necessary."
ST GIRL FOUND;-
STUDENT CLEARED'
port from Detroit, states that
Mellon, who disappeared from
Lcme there Saturday evening, has
found. This absolves from all
e the University student who was
st .suspected of knowing of the

Little responsee has been given to
the repeated calls sent out to tht
rooming house owners of Ann Arbor
by the Michigan Union, regarding the
listing of available rooms during the
May Festival week-end, according to,
Philip J. Schneider, '24, chairman of
the rooming committee of the Union.
With the Festival time less than a
week off, it has become absolutely
imperative that more than 100 rooms
be secured to take care of the visitors
during the overflow. As a guarantee
to the landlady, and to avoid pre-
vious difficulties regarding rooms, no
rooms will be reserved for out-of-
town guests prior to their arrival.
The Union will be the only place
which will act as such a bureau and
it is highly advisable that all persons
having available rooms turn in a list
of these rooms to the Union together
with prices, as soon as possible, ac-,
cording to Schneider.1
GIRLS' GLEE CLUB ELECTS
OFFICERS FOR COMING YEAR
The University Girls' -Glee club heldi
their last meeting for this year on1
Tuesday afternoon. The following of-
ficers were elected for the year 1922-'
23: Elizabeth Hoyt, '23, president;
Dorothy Lane, '24, vice-president; Mu-
riel Zimmerman, '23, secretary; Ma-3
rie Heyer, '23, treasurer; Dorothy'
Westphal, '24, librarian; Nona Doher-1
tv. '23.aiftor.

1
1
J
1
,<
f
7

Constitutional changes of an impor-j
tant nature, according to Union of-
ficials are involved' in the proposed
alterations to the Union constitution
which will be voted upon by a meet-
ing of all menbers next Tuesday
night in the assemblynhall of the
Union.
Every member of the Union is urg-
ed to attend the meeting in order that
the action taken may be fully repre-
sentative. The changes proposed have
to do with the payment of dues for
the regular term, the Summer session
and faculty dues, the designation of
the duration of annual membership,'
appointment of the financial secre-
tary ex-officio, the personnel of the
board of governors, and the power
to fill vacancies in the latter body,
fixing-the date of Union elections,
and miscellaneous minor changes.
GIVE "CLOISTER" BEFORE
APPRECIATIVE1AUD0INCE,
MIMES ACHIEVES SUCCESS IN
FIRST AMERICAN PRE.
SENTATION
(By Paul Watzel)
Before a. small but appreciative au-
dience the first public performance of
"The Cloister" in this country was
given last night in the Mimes theater.
The play, which is the work of
Emile Verhaeren, is not one that is
wide in its appeal, being limited both
by its subject matter and its form.
However, Zits symbolism, its fine rhe-
torical form,, its inspirational quali-
ties, mark it as a production of more
than 4he usual quality.
It is seldom that amateurs choose
such plays for presentation. It is
more seldom that they succeed.
Mimes, first in sponsoring the produc-
tion, and then in presenting the play
in excellent fashion, deserves much
praise.
To the emotional acting of Carl W.
Guske, '22, as Dom Balthazar, and to
the portrayals of deliberate and cool
calculations by Thomas I. Under-
wood, '23L, as Father Thomas, is
largely due the success of the eve-
ning. Their work was far better than
audiences are accustomed to see on
the amateur stage.
Lauren B. Stokesberry, '24 S. of. M.,
acting the part of Dom Mark, the pure
and innocent youth, and Elman B.
Pettijohn, as the Prior, although in
lesser roles, showed much ability.
The remainder of the cast showed de-
liberate choosing' and careful train-
i'--

VAN TYNE CHARGE6
"I Knew Nothing of the Hazing and
Took no Part in it," He
Declares
SUGGESTS POSSIBLE CAUSE
FOR PRESENT SITUATION
Exception to implications drawn
from a statement issued Thursday by
Prof. Claude C. Van Tyne, professor
of history, were taken yesterday by
Vernon Hillery, president-elect of the
Student council.
The statement inferred that Hillery
was responsible for recent hazing
episodes in which Professor Van
Tyne's son was the victim.
Hillery treated the matter com-
paratively lightly so far as the profes-
sor is concerned, interpretitig the
statement'as the impulsive remark of
a man who is naturally sympathizing
with his son, and in so ,going seeks.
to place the blame upon one rather
than a group of individuals.
Makes Posidon Clear
Hillery, however, in protection of
his own interests in the matter sought
to make clear his own position.
"The statement made by Professor
Van Tyne seems to infer ,that I not
only knew of the having to which his
son was subjected, but also that I took'
part in it," he said.
"As a matter of fact, I knew noth-
ing of the hazing and took absolute-
ly no part in it. As president-elect
of the Student council, my conscience
would not permit ie to do such a
thing.
Respect for Authority
"If Professor Van Tyne is search-'
ing for the reasons that brought about
the punishment inflicted upon his son
because of his son's failure to abide
by the traditions of the University, he
might take cognizance of the fact that
this University is composed of a stu-
dent body of red blooded young men
who have justkenough respect for
authority to take it into their own
hands when that authority which they
have delegated to a smaller group is
overridden. I might suggest that had
Josselyn Van Tyne continued wearing
his pot as he promised to do as the
result of the Underclass Conduct com-
mittee's ruling, the entire . matter
would not have developed into such a
serious state as it is at present.
(Continued on Page Three)
ATTEND CHURCH ON
MOTHER'S DAY IS
SLOGAN OF S. C. A.

DENOUNCES
AS AN

Before more than 150 Michigan
alumni Thursday at Port Huron,
President Marion L. Burton answered
those who, he said, had maligned his
purposes and even his character in
his handling of University affairs. He
indignantly denounced the rumor that
the administration is using the mill
tax for the new building prbgram in-
stead of for general upkeep. He call-
ed the report an abs'urd fabrication,
asserting that in an institution like the
University, such lack of business in-
tegrity would be impossible.
He referred to the recent outbreaks
of hazing on the campus, and said
that due exercise of a saving sense
of humor would prevent alumni from
overestimating the seriousness of the
matter. However, he declared that
"the University never has and never
will tolerate any violence."
Charges made aginst him Wednes-
day by Dr. T. G. Yeomans, at the an-
nual meeting of the Michigan State1
Homoeopathic Medical society here,'
were flatly denied. The President
stated that he had proof of his in-
nocence of the charge of double-deal-
ing in- the Medical school merger.
This proof has recently been pub-
lished.
In the evening the President was
the principal speaker before the con-
vention of the Michigan Parent-
Teacher association,
DATES FOR ENINERS'
EXAMS ARE ANNONCED
PERIOD TO BEGIN ON SATURDAY,
JUNE 3, INSTEAD OF
JUNE 5
The final examination period in the
college of engineering and architec-
ture will start Saturday, June 3, this
year, 'as in the literary college, in-
stead of June 5, as announced in the
University catalogue.
Examination times will in general
be determined by the hour of the first
class in a -course in the regular
weekly schedule, "the times being
identical, except for certain subjects,'
with those of lit examinations. The
schedule follows:
Monday at 8, second 'Monday morn-
ing; at :9, Thursday morning; at 10,
Friday morning; at 11, first Monday
mornixjg; - at 1, second - Saturday
morning; at 2, Friday afternoon; at 3,
second Tuesday afternoon; . at 4,
Thursday afternoon.
Tuesday at 8, first Saturday morn-
ng; at 9, first Monday afternoon; at,
10, first Tuesday , morning; at 11,
first Saturday afternoon; at 1, first
Wednesday morning; at 2, secotd
Tuesday morning; at 3, second SMtur-
(Continued on Page Eight) I
ATTORNEY GENERAL
TO SPEAK SUNDAY
"The Business of Government," will
be the topic of the address by Hon.
Merlin Wiley, '04L, attorney general"
of Michigan, at 3 o'clock tomorrow
afternoon at the Union Sunday meet-
ing.
As a member of the legislature, thej
Michigan securities commission, and
through his work as attorney general
since 1920 the speaker has gained a
knowledge which should well supple-
nment his talk at the Union, accordingl
to his Ann Arbor acquaintances.
The talk will involve the explana-
tion of problems of state government.
The speaker will also develop his;
topic with special regard to giving all
possible information to those who in-
tend to enter the field of government

3 MILL TAX REPORT
"ABSURD FABRI-
CATION"

EACH SIDE .WINS ONE P(
ROPE BREAKS IN THIR)
PULL
CLLASSES STRUGGLE F
PLACE AT AUDITOR
'24 Men Use Fire Hose to Dis
Yearlings After Hour's Unsu
cessfnl Attempt
Sophomores and freshmen foug
a tie score of one to one yest
afternoon in the annual tug-o
across the Huron river. Tie S
mores after taking their place o
east bank of the river, capture
rope from the yearlings withi
minutes after the whistle had I
the fray.
The classmen then changed b
In the second pull the first year
gained advantage over the s
mores, and in less than one mi
time had dislodged their oppo
and had the rope within their pc
si.og. For the third pull the s
mores kept the west bank for
battle ground.
Attempt Strategy
In a'final attempt to win the
sive point, the freshmen anh
their end of the rope to a large s
securely planted in the ground
sophomores tied their end to a t
Within a fqw seconds after the V
tle had been blown for the third
each class began to cheer ove
victory, but it was a victory for r
er class, as the rope broke in the
ter.
Following the finish of the
pull each class set out to mar
Hill, auditorium. The sophom
when they had arrived, found
yearlings drawn up in ranks o
steps of the auditorium, the :
where the victors of the games
supposed to have their, plc
taken.
Drive O ponents Away
. The sophomores, also claiining
victory, spent nearly an hour In
tempting to dislodge the freshm
Finally the second year men
nected a fire hose to a nearby
drant, and temporarily drove1
opponents from the coveted i
However, in accordance with th
cision of the Student council,
sophomores were given the plac
which to have their tpictures t
¢ut with the agreement that their
fion of the rope was to be left 0
the picture.
Theodore P. Bank, '23, chairma
the Spring games, proposed
hereafter in the tug-of-war 'the
testants be roped off so as to p
of no unfair conduct in the g
He also urged that both classes
the greatest sportsmanship pos
in the games to be held at 10 o'
this morning on Ferry field,.
The sophomores will meet at
o'clock in front of Waterman gy
slum, and the freshmen will me
front of the Library at the s
time.
The rope-tying contest will
three points, and each of the I
obstacle races will count one pi:
today's games, according to the
nouncement of authorities in ch
URSESENIORS To' WE
R AES AT SPRING. BA
Sators 1-ve been strongly u
by the Student council to wear
canes to Ferry field this mornin
the insignia of their class.
"Cane day was set aside Jus
start things right, and it was exj
ed that seniors would continue to
ry their canes any time there
that they wished," said an office
the,. student council yesterday,
commenting on the failure of r
seniors to. take advantage of
privilege offered them through
cane tradition. "We did not mes
set Cane day as the only time
which they should wear canes,"

added.
It is understood that the counc
making efforts to have reserved
tions set aside for members of
senior class at all baseball games
mittance to the reserved portio
the stands to be gained only by t
wearing caps and gowns or car
canes.
SUMME FORMAL ATTIRE
APPEARS AT '22E S
Summer formal attire was in
ence at the annual senior engi
Step last night in the Union main
ing room. Dancing continued fro

Tommorrow is Mother's Day; the
Student Christian association is mak-
ing an attempt to have every student
observe it by attending church, and
letters have been sent to all fraterni-
ties and sororities -asking that a spe-
cial effort be made to attend services
tomorrow. The -movement is in charge
of C. B. Van Antwerp, '22.
-The King's Daughters are attempt-
ing to secure lilacs to be placed in
each room of the University hospital
Sunday. Those wishing to contri-
bute may phone 1633-M, 2261-W, or
1331-R.
ALLEG AN HIGH IS
DEBATE WINNER
Allegan high, opposed by Durand
high, won the Michigan High School
Debating league championship in UnI-
versity hall last night, 4 to 1. The
question debated was, Resolved, that.
the principle of the closed shop in
American industry should receive the

:her, in commenting on
night, stated that he
ng man designated as
visited him here and

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